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  1. Sue Campbell (unknown). The Aristotelian Mean and the Vices of Gender. Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 6.
     
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  2. Sue Campbell (2014). Our Faithfulness to the Past: The Ethics and Politics of Memory. OUP Usa.
    Essays by the late feminist philosopher Sue Campbell explore the entanglement of epistemic and ethical values in our attempts to be faithful to our pasts. Her relational conception of memory is used to confront the challenges of sharing memory and reconstituting selves even in contexts fractured by moral and political differences.
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  3. Sue Campbell (2013). A Singular and Representative Life: Personal Memory and Systematic Harms. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (sup1):227-257.
    (1999). A Singular and Representative Life: Personal Memory and Systematic Harms. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 29, Supplementary Volume 25: Civilization and Oppression, pp. 227-257.
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  4. Sue Campbell (2009). Inside the Frame of the Past : Memory, Diversity, and Solidarity. In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press 211--33.
  5. Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.) (2009). Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  6. Sue Campbell (2008). Review of Jeffrey Blustein, The Moral Demands of Memory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (8).
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  7. Sue Campbell (2006). Our Faithfulness to the Past: Reconstructing Memory Value. Philosophical Psychology 19 (3):361 – 380.
    The reconstructive turn in memory theory challenges us to provide an account of successful remembering that is attentive to the ways in which we use memory, both individually and socially. I investigate conceptualizations of accuracy and integrity useful to memory theorists and argue that faithful recollection is often a complex epistemological/ethical achievement.
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  8. Sue Campbell (2005). Response to Commentators. Social Philosophy Today 21:261-266.
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  9. Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
     
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  10. Sue Campbell (2004). Models of Minds and Memory Activities. In Peggy DesAutels & Margaret Urban Walker (eds.), Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield 119.
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  11. Sue Campbell & Claudia Card (2004). Phenomenology of Oppression (1990) and Sympathy and Solidarity (2001). Paul Benson is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Dayton. His Recent Work Addresses Personal Autonomy, Free Agency, and Moral Responsibility. He is Completing a Book-Length Project That Examines Neglected Psychological, Social, and Evaluative Dimensions Of. [REVIEW] In Peggy DesAutels & Margaret Urban Walker (eds.), Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield 243.
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  12. Sue Campbell (2003). Relational Remembering: Rethinking the Memory Wars. Rowman & Littlefield.
    This book offers a feminist philosophical analysis of contemporary public skepticism about women's memories of past harm.
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  13. Sue Campbell (2002). Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Automony, Agency, and the Social Self (Review). Hypatia 17 (2):165-168.
  14. Sue Campbell (2002). Susan E. Babbitt, Artless Integrity: Moral Imagination, Agency, and Stories Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (4):241-243.
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  15. Sue Campbell (2002). Book Review: Catriona MacKenzie and Natalie Stoljar. Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency, and the Social Self. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (2):165-168.
  16. Sue Campbell (2001). A Feminist I: Reflections From Academia Christine Overall Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press, 1998, 214 Pp., $19.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 40 (02):412-.
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  17. Sue Campbell (2001). A Feminist I. Dialogue 40 (2):412-415.
  18. Susan E. Babbitt & Sue Campbell (eds.) (1999). Racism and Philosophy. Cornell University Press.
    By definitively establishing that racism has broad implications for how the entire field of philosophy is practiced -- and by whom -- this powerful and ...
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  19. Sue Campbell (1999). A Singular and Representative Life. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (Supplement):227-257.
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  20. Sue Campbell (1999). Dominant Identities and Settled Expectations. In Susan E. Babbitt & Sue Campbell (eds.), Racism and Philosophy. Cornell University Press 216--234.
  21. Sue Campbell (1999). Interpreting the Personal: Expression and the Formation of Feelings. The Personalist Forum 15 (1):185-187.
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  22. Sue Campbell (1998). Book Review: Diana Tietjens Meyers. Feminists Rethink the Self. Boulder: Westview Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 13 (3):173-176.
  23. Sue Campbell (1997). Women, "False" Memory, and Personal Identity. Hypatia 12 (2):51 - 82.
    We contest each other's memory claims all the time. I am concerned with how the contesting of memory claims and narratives may be an integral part of many abusive situations. I use the writings of Otto Weininger and the False Memory Syndrome Foundation to explore a particular strategy of discrediting women as rememberers, making them more vulnerable to sexual harm. This strategy relies on the presentation of women as unable to maintain a stable enough sense of self or identity to (...)
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  24. Sue Campbell (1994). Being Dismissed: The Politics of Emotional Expression. Hypatia 9 (3):46 - 65.
    My intent is to bring a key group of critical terms associated with the emotions-bitterness, sentimentality, and emotionality-to greater feminist attention. These terms are used to characterize emoters on the basis of how we express ourselves, and they characterize us in ways that we need no longer be taken seriously. I analyze the ways in which these terms of emotional dismissal can be put to powerful political use.
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  25. Sue Campbell (1992). Elegy and Identity. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 5:7-24.
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