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Michael Silberstein [29]Michael D. Silberstein [1]
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Profile: Michael Silberstein (Elizabethtown College)
  1. Michael Silberstein, Quantum Physics and Consciousness: The Quest for a Common Conceptual Foundation.
    Similar problems keep reappearing in both the discussion about the “hard” problem of consciousness and in fundamental issues in quantum theory. We argue that the similarities are due to common problems within the conceptual foundations of both fields. In quantum physics, the state reduction marks the “coming into being” of a new aspect of reality for which no causal explanation is available. Likewise, the self-referential nature of consciousness constitutes a “coming into being” of a new quality which goes (...)
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  2. Michael Silberstein, Explaining Consciousness: Convergence on Emergence.
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  3. Michael Silberstein & Anthony Chemero (forthcoming). Constraints on Localization and Decomposition as Explanatory Strategies in the Biological Sciences. 80 (5):958-970.
    Several articles have recently appeared arguing that there really are no viable alternatives to mechanistic explanation in the biological sciences (Kaplan and Bechtel; Kaplan and Craver). We argue that mechanistic explanation is defined by localization and decomposition. We argue further that systems neuroscience contains explanations that violate both localization and decomposition. We conclude that the mechanistic model of explanation needs to either stretch to now include explanations wherein localization or decomposition fail or acknowledge that there are counterexamples to mechanistic explanation (...)
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  4. Michael Silberstein, W. M. Stuckey & Timothy McDevitt (2013). Being, Becoming and the Undivided Universe: A Dialogue Between Relational Blockworld and the Implicate Order Concerning the Unification of Relativity and Quantum Theory. Foundations of Physics 43 (4):502-532.
    In this paper two different approaches to unification will be compared, Relational Blockworld (RBW) and Hiley’s implicate order. Both approaches are monistic in that they attempt to derive matter and spacetime geometry ‘at once’ in an interdependent and background independent fashion from something underneath both quantum theory and relativity. Hiley’s monism resides in the implicate order via Clifford algebras and is based on process as fundamental while RBW’s monism resides in spacetimematter via path integrals over graphs whereby space, time and (...)
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  5. Michael Silberstein (2012). Emergence and Reduction in Context: Philosophy of Science and/or Analytic Metaphysics. [REVIEW] Metascience 21 (3):627-642.
    Emergence and reduction in context: Philosophy of science and/or analytic metaphysics Content Type Journal Article Category Survey Review Pages 1-16 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9671-4 Authors Michael Silberstein, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, PA 17022, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  6. Michael Silberstein & Anthony Chemero (2012). Complexity and Extended Phenomenological‐Cognitive Systems. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):35-50.
    The complex systems approach to cognitive science invites a new understanding of extended cognitive systems. According to this understanding, extended cognitive systems are heterogenous, composed of brain, body, and niche, non-linearly coupled to one another. This view of cognitive systems, as non-linearly coupled brain–body–niche systems, promises conceptual and methodological advances. In this article we focus on two of these. First, the fundamental interdependence among brain, body, and niche makes it possible to explain extended cognition without invoking representations or computation. Second, (...)
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  7. Michael Silberstein (2011). Dynamics, Agency and Intentional Action. Humana.Mente 15:1-19.
  8. Michael Silberstein (2011). Metaphysics or Science: The Battle for the Soul of Philosophy of Mind. Philosophical Psychology 24 (4):561-573.
    Philosophical Psychology, Volume 24, Issue 4, Page 561-573, August 2011.
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  9. Daniel Peterson & Michael Silberstein (2010). Relativity of Simultaneity and Eternalism: In Defense of Blockworld. In Vesselin Petkov (ed.), Space, Time, and Spacetime: Physical and Philosophical Implications of Minkowski's Unification of Space and Time. Springer.
    Ever since the now infamous comments made by Hermann Minkowski in 1908 concerning the proper way to view space-time, the debate has raged as to whether or not the universe should be viewed as a four-dimensional, unified whole wherein the past, present, and future are equally real or whether the views espoused by the possibilists, historicists, and presentists regarding the unreality of the future (and, for presentists, the past) are best. Now, a century after Minkowski’s proposed blockworld first sparked debate, (...)
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  10. Anthony Chemero & Michael Silberstein (2008). After the Philosophy of Mind: Replacing Scholasticism with Science. Philosophy of Science 75 (1):1-27.
  11. Tony Chemero & Michael Silberstein (2008). After the Philosophy of Mind: Replacing Scholasticism with Science. Philosophy of Science 75 (1):1-27.
    We provide a taxonomy of the two most important debates in the philosophy of the cognitive and neural sciences. The first debate is over methodological individualism: is the object of the cognitive and neural sciences the brain, the whole animal, or the animal--environment system? The second is over explanatory style: should explanation in cognitive and neural science be reductionist-mechanistic, inter-level mechanistic, or dynamical? After setting out the debates, we discuss the ways in which they are interconnected. Finally, we make some (...)
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  12. Michael Silberstein, Michael Cifone & William Mark Stuckey (2008). Why Quantum Mechanics Favors Adynamical and Acausal Interpretations Such as Relational Blockworld Over Backwardly Causal and Time-Symmetric Rivals. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (4):736-751.
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  13. Tony Chemero & Michael Silberstein, Defending Extended Cognition.
    In this talk, we defend extended cognition against several criticisms. We argue that extended cognition does not derive from armchair theorizing and that it neither ignores the results of the neural sciences, nor minimizes the importance of the brain in the production of intelligent behavior. We also argue that explanatory success in the cognitive sciences does not depend on localist or reductionist methodologies; part of our argument for this is a defense of what might be called ‘holistic science’.
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  14. Michael Silberstein, W. M. Stuckey & Michael Cifone, An Argument for 4d Blockworld From a Geometric Interpretation of Non-Relativistic Quantum Mechanics.
    We use a new, distinctly “geometrical” interpretation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics (NRQM) to argue for the fundamentality of the 4D blockworld ontology. We argue for a geometrical interpretation whose fundamental ontology is one of spacetime relations as opposed to constructive entities whose time-dependent behavior is governed by dynamical laws. Our view rests on two formal results: Kaiser (1981 & 1990), Bohr & Ulfbeck (1995) and Anandan, (2003) showed independently that the Heisenberg commutation relations of NRQM follow from the relativity of (...)
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  15. W. M. Stuckey, Michael Silberstein & Michael Cifone, The Relational Blockworld Interpretation of Non-Relativistic Quantum Mechanics.
    We introduce a new interpretation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics (QM) called Relational Blockworld (RBW). We motivate the interpretation by outlining two results due to Kaiser, Bohr, Ulfeck, Mottelson, and Anandan, independently. First, the canonical commutation relations for position and momentum can be obtained from boost and translation operators,respectively, in a spacetime where the relativity of simultaneity holds. Second, the QM density operator can be obtained from the spacetime symmetry group of the experimental configuration exclusively. We show how QM, obtained from (...)
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  16. Michael Silberstein (2006). Emergence, Theology, and the Manifest Image. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oup Oxford. 784-800.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712279; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 784-800.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 799-800.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  17. Michael Silberstein (2006). In Defence of Ontological Emergence and Mental Causation. In Philip Clayton & Paul Sheldon Davies (eds.), The Re-Emergence of Emergence. Oxford University Press. 203.
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  18. W. M. Stuckey, Michael Silberstein & Michael Cifone, Reversing the Arrow of Explanation in the Relational Blockworld: Why Temporal Becoming, the Dynamical Brain and the External World Are All "in the Mind".
    We introduce the Relational Blockworld (RBW) as a paradigm for deflating the mysteries associated with quantum non-separability/non-locality and the measurement problem. We begin by describing how the relativity of simultaneity implies the blockworld, which has an explanatory potential subsuming both dynamical and relational explanations. It is then shown how the canonical commutation relations fundamental to non-relativistic quantum mechanics follow from the relativity of simultaneity. Therefore, quantum mechanics has at its disposal the full explanatory power of the blockworld. Quantum mechanics exploits (...)
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  19. Michael Silberstein (2004). Space, Time, and Magic. In David Baggett, Shawn E. Klein & William Irwin (eds.), Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts. Chicago: Open Court. 186--99.
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  20. Ramón Moreno Cuevas, Peter Machamer, Michael Silberstein, Yuri Balashov, Alex Rosenberg & Lynette Hunter (2002). Rescher, Nicholas (2001), Minding Matter, Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publish-Ers, USD 60 (Cloth), USD 21.95 (Pb). Fuller, Steve (2002), Thomas Kuhn: A Philosophical History for Our Times, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, USD 22.50 (Pb). [REVIEW] Synthese 133:455-456.
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  21. Peter K. Machamer & Michael Silberstein (eds.) (2002). Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell.
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  22. Peter K. Machamer & Michael Silberstein (eds.) (2002). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell.
    This volume presentsa definitive introduction to the core areas of philosophy of science.
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  23. Michael Silberstein (2002). Reduction, Emergence and Explanation. In Peter K. Machamer & Michael Silberstein (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge: Blackwell. 80--107.
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  24. Michael Silberstein (2002). Reductive Physicalism and the Explanatory Gap: A Dilemma. In Peter K. Machamer & Michael Silberstein (eds.), Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell.
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  25. Michael Silberstein (ed.) (2002). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge: Blackwell.
    This volume presentsa definitive introduction to the core areas of philosophy of science.
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  26. Michael Silberstein (2001). Converging on Emergence: Consciousness, Causation and Explanation. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (9-10):61-98.
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  27. Michael Silberstein & J. McGeever (1999). The Search for Ontological Emergence. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (195):182-200.
    We survey and clarify some recent appearances of the term ‘emergence’. We distinguish epistemological emergence, which is merely a limitation of descriptive apparatus, from ontological emergence, which should involve causal features of a whole system not reducible to the properties of its parts, thus implying the failure of part/whole reductionism and of mereological supervenience for that system. Are there actually any plausible cases of the latter among the numerous and various mentions of ‘emergence’ in the recent literature? Quantum mechanics seems (...)
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  28. Michael Silberstein (1998). Emergence and the Mind-Body Problem. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (4):464-82.
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  29. James Hawthorne & Michael Silberstein (1995). For Whom the Bell Arguments Toll. Synthese 102 (1):99-138.
    We will formulate two Bell arguments. Together they show that if the probabilities given by quantum mechanics are approximately correct, then the properties exhibited by certain physical systems must be nontrivially dependent on thetypes of measurements performedand eithernonlocally connected orholistically related to distant events. Although a number of related arguments have appeared since John Bell's original paper (1964), they tend to be either highly technical or to lack full generality. The following arguments depend on the weakest of premises, and the (...)
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  30. Michael D. Silberstein (1995). Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking (Third Edition). Teaching Philosophy 18 (4):377-379.
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