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Profile: Rosalind Hursthouse (University of Auckland)
  1. Rosalind Hursthouse (2012). Human Nature and Aristotelian Virtue Ethics. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 70:169-188.
  2. Rosalind Hursthouse (2010). Doctor‐Assisted Suicide: A Commentary on Lesser. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):335-336.
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  3. Rosalind Hursthouse (2010). Hume on Justice. In Charles R. Pigden (ed.), Hume on Motivation and Virtue. Palgrave Macmillan. 264.
  4. Philippa Foot & Rosalind Hursthouse (2007). Famine, Affluence, and Virtue. In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press. 279.
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  5. Rosalind Hursthouse (2007). Aristotle for Women Who Love Too Much. Ethics 117 (2):327-334.
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  6. Rosalind Hursthouse (2007). Environmental Virtue Ethics. In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press. 155--172.
  7. Rosalind Hursthouse (2007). Two Ways of Doing the Right Thing. In Colin Patrick Farrelly & Lawrence Solum (eds.), Virtue Jurisprudence. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  8. Philip Pettit, David Lefkowitz, Steven Wall, Mark Schroeder, Paula Casal & Rosalind Hursthouse (2007). 10. Evan Selinger and Robert Crease, Eds., The Philosophy of Expertise Evan Selinger and Robert Crease, Eds., The Philosophy of Expertise (Pp. 377-381). [REVIEW] In Laurie DiMauro (ed.), Ethics. Greenhaven Press.
     
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  9. Rosalind Hursthouse (2006). Are Virtues the Proper Starting Point for Morality? In James Lawrence Dreier (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Moral Theory. Blackwell Pub.. 99--112.
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  10. Rosalind Hursthouse (2006). Practical Wisdom: A Mundane Account. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (3):283–307.
    The prevailing accounts of Aristotle's view of practical wisdom pay little attention to all the intellectual capacities discussed in Nicomachean Ethics Book 6. They also contrast the phronimos with the wicked, the continent or the incontinent, rather than with those who have 'natural virtue' (innate or habituated), and thereby they neglect the importance of experience, through which those capacities are acquired. When we consider them, we can see what sort of experience is needed and hence what sort aspirants to full (...)
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  11. Rosalind Hursthouse (2006). The Central Doctrine of the Mean. In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Blackwell Pub.. 96--115.
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  12. Rosalind Hursthouse (2002). Review: Emotional Reason: Deliberation, Motivation and the Nature of Value. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (442):418-422.
  13. Rosalind Hursthouse (2002). Virtue Ethics Vs. Rule-Consequentialism: A Reply to Brad Hooker. Utilitas 14 (01):41-.
    In On Virtue Ethics I offered a criterion for a character trait's being a virtue according to which a virtuous character trait must conduce to, or at least not be inimical to, four ends, one of which is the continuance of the human species. I argue here that this does not commit me to homosexuality's being a vice, since homosexuality is not a character trait and hence not up for assessment as a virtue or a vice. Vegetarianism is not up (...)
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  14. Rosalind Hursthouse (2000). Ethics, Humans, and Other Animals: An Introduction with Readings. Routledge.
    Rosalind Hursthouse carefully introduces one of three standard approaches in current ethical theory: utilitarianism, rights, and virtue ethics. She then proceeds to clearly explain how each approach encourages us to think about our treatment of animals. Every chapter is linked to a reading from a key exponent of each approach. With readings from Singer, Regan and Midgley.
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  15. Rosalind Hursthouse (2000). Intention. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 46:83-.
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  16. Rosalind Hursthouse (1999/2001). On Virtue Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Virtue ethics is perhaps the most important development within late twentieth-century moral philosophy. Rosalind Hursthouse, who has made notable contributions to this development, here presents a full exposition and defense of her neo-Aristotelian version of virtue ethics. She shows how virtue ethics can provide guidance for action, illuminate moral dilemmas, and bring out the moral significance of the emotions.
     
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  17. Rosalind Hursthouse (1999). Rosalind Hursthouse. In Nigel Warburton (ed.), Philosophy: The Basic Readings. Routledge. 110.
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  18. Rosalind Hursthouse (1999). Virtue Ethics and Human Nature. Hume Studies 25 (1/2):67-82.
    Hume's disjunctive (useful or agreeable, etc.) account of the grounds of moral approbation of the virtues is wildly--and disastrously--different from the conjunctive account implied by the Aristotelian and Epicurean tradition. It seems that Hume often inclines towards the latter and, thereby, its reliance on the distinctions between the truly useful and agreeable and the merely apparently so, which, in that tradition, are discernible only by the _phronimos<D>. We may regard being the 'good critic' in morals (and, less plausibly, taking up (...)
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  19. J. L. Ackrill, Julia Annas, M. F. Burnyeat, John M. Cooper, Marcia L. Homiak, Rosalind Hursthouse, T. H. Irwin, L. A. Kosman, Richard Kraut, John McDowell, Alfred R. Mele & Martha C. Nussbaum (1998). Aristotle's Ethics: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  20. Rosalind Hursthouse (1998). An Interview with Rosalind Hursthouse. Cogito 12 (1):5-10.
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  21. Rosalind Hursthouse (1998). Practical Ethics. Normative Virtue Ethics. In Roger Crisp (ed.), How Should One Live?: Essays on the Virtues. Clarendon Press.
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  22. Rosalind Hursthouse (1997). Virtue Ethics and the Emotions. In Daniel Statman (ed.), Virtue Ethics. Georgetown University Press. 99--117.
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  23. Rosalind Hursthouse (1995). Applying Virtue Ethics. In Rosalind Hursthouse, Gavin Lawrence & Warren Quinn (eds.), Virtues and Reasons. Clarendon Press. 57--75.
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  24. Rosalind Hursthouse (1995). Fallacies and Moral Dilemmas. Argumentation 9 (4):617-632.
    The continuing debate between utilitarians and deontologists often takes the form of disagreement over how particular moral dilemmas are to be resolved, but protagonists on both sides tend to overlook the possibility of resolving a dilemma “with remainder”, such as regret. The importance of “remainder” is also overlooked by critics of some “absolutist” ways of resolving or slipping between the horns of certain moral dilemmas. Moreover, deontologists, if not utilitarians, can be criticised for overlooking the possibility that, according to their (...)
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  25. Rosalind Hursthouse (1995). The Virtuous Agent's Reasons: A Response to Williams.”. In Robert Heinaman (ed.), Aristotle and Moral Realism. Westview Press.
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  26. Rosalind Hursthouse, Gavin Lawrence & Warren Quinn (eds.) (1995). Virtues and Reasons: Philippa Foot and Moral Theory: Essays in Honour of Philippa Foot. Oxford University Press.
    Philippa Foot is one of the most original and widely respected philosophers of our time; her work has exerted a lasting influence on the development of moral philosophy. In tribute to her, twelve leading philosophers from both sides of the Atlantic have contributed essays exploring the various topics in moral philosophy to which she has made a distinctive contribution--virtue ethics, naturalism, non-cognitivism, relativism, categorical requirements, and the role of rationality in morality.
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  27. Rosalind Hursthouse (1993). Slote on Self-Sufficiency. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (2):57-67.
  28. Rosalind Hursthouse (1991). Arational Actions. Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):57-68.
    According to the standard account of actions and their explanations, intentional actions are actions done because the agent has a certain desire/belief pair that explains the action by rationalizing it. Any explanation of intentional action in terms of an appetite or occurrent emotion (which might appear to be an explanation solely in terms of desire) is hence assumed to be elliptical, implicitly appealing to some appropriate belief. In this paper, I challenge this assumption with respect to the "arational" actions of (...)
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  29. Rosalind Hursthouse (1991). Virtue Theory and Abortion. Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (3):223-246.
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  30. Rosalind Hursthouse (1990). After Hume's Justice. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 91:229 - 245.
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  31. Rosalind Hursthouse (1988). Moral Habituation. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 6:201-19.
     
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  32. Rosalind Hursthouse (1986). Aristotle. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 20:33-.
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  33. Rosalind Hursthouse (1986). Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 20:35-53.
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  34. Rosalind Hursthouse (1984). Acting and Feeling in Character: "Nicomachean Ethics" 3.I. Phronesis 29 (3):252 - 266.
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  35. Rosalind Hursthouse (1984). A Cting and Feeling in Character: Nicomachean Ethics 3.I. Phronesis 29 (3):252-266.
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  36. Rosalind Hursthouse (1984). Plato on the Emotions. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 58:81-96.
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  37. Martha C. Nussbaum & Rosalind Hursthouse (1984). Plato on Commensurability and Desire. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 58:55 - 96.
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  38. E. J. Borowski, Oswald Hanfling, Rosalind Hursthouse & Stuart Brown (1981). The Uses and Abuses of Argument.Introduction to Philosophy.Key Concepts.Work, Morality and Human Nature. Philosophical Quarterly 31 (123):184.
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  39. Rosalind Hursthouse (1980). A False Doctrine of the Mean. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 81:57 - 72.
    Aristotle says that ethike arete, excellence of character, is a disposition in virtue of which we are well disposed in respect of feelings (pathe'). Feelings are said to be such things as appetites, emotions such as anger and fear, and, in general, all conditions that are attended by pleasure or pain. (II 05bI 9ff) Taken in isolation, this might sound as though Aristotle makes excellence of character a merely inner matter, but this is not so. Most feelings involve a desire (...)
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  40. Rosalind Hursthouse (1980). Denoting in the Principles of Mathematics. Synthese 45 (1):33 - 42.
    In "the principles of mathematics" russell accepts (a) that word meaning (e.G., That 'fido' means fido) is irrelevant to logic and (b) that such sentences as 'all men are mortal' do not express quantified propositions but are about things (in this case, The class of men). If we note these confusions, And also that (b), Though not (a) has been abandoned by 'on denoting', We see what denoting is and how russell relates to frege on sinn and bedautung.
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  41. Rosalind Hursthouse & Oliver A. Johnson (1980). Skepticism and Cognitivism. Philosophical Quarterly 30 (120):260.
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  42. Rosalind Hursthouse (1969). The Logic of Decision and Action. Philosophical Books 10 (1):24-26.
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