Results for 'Criminal jurisdiction Philosophy'

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  1. Universal Jurisdiction and International Criminal Law.Jovana Davidovic - 2015 - In Chad Flanders & Zach Hoskins (eds.), The New Philosophy of Criminal Law. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 113-130.
    Davidovic asks what gives the international community the authority to punish some crimes? On one prominent view some crimes (genome, torture) are so heinous that the international community, so long as its procedures are fair, is justified in prosecuting them. Another view contends that heinousness alone is not enough to justify international prosecution: what is needed is an account of why the international community, in particular, has standing to hold the perpetrators to account. Davidovic raises concerns about both of these (...)
     
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  2.  14
    The Indeterminacy of an Emergency: Challenges to Criminal Jurisdiction in Constitutional Democracy. [REVIEW]Mireille Hildebrandt - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (2):161-181.
    In this contribution I address the type of emergency that threatens a state’s monopoly of violence, meaning that the state’s competence to provide citizens with elementary security is challenged. The question is, whether actions taken by the state to ward off these threats (should) fall within the ambit of the criminal law. A central problem is the indeterminacy that is inherent in the state of emergency, implicating that adequate measures as well as constitutional constraints to be imposed on such (...)
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    A Reductio Ad Absurdum of Restricted, Tribal Criminal Jurisdiction.Clifton Perry - 2004 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):253-262.
    As Federal Indian Law has evolved, many questions have been posed regarding tribal jurisdiction. This paper examines the jurisdiction tribes have over member Indians, non-member Indians, and non-member, non-Indians. It addresses the ethical challenge faced by tribal attorneys who represent non-member Indian clients in a manner that ultimately undermines tribal sovereignty.
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    Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This work provides, for the first time, a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both British and American criminal law and its underlying morality. It defends the view that human actions are volitionally caused body movements. This theory illuminates three major problems in drafting and implementing criminal law--what the voluntary act requirement does and should require, what complex descriptions of actions prohibited by criminal codes both do and should require, and when the two actions (...)
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  5.  94
    Review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays. [REVIEW]Andrew Botterell - 2013 - University of Toronto Law Journal 63 (1):152-158.
    A review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays (Oxford University Press, 2010).
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  6.  46
    The Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays.Douglas N. Husak - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Does criminal liability require an act? -- Motive and criminal liability -- The costs to criminal theory of supposing that intentions are irrelevant to permissibility -- Transferred intent -- The nature and justifiability of nonconsummate offenses -- Strict liability, justice, and proportionality -- The sequential principle of relative culpability -- Willful ignorance, knowledge, and the equal culpability thesis : a study of the significance of the principle of legality -- Rapes without rapists : consent and reasonable mistake (...)
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  7.  60
    Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique.Antony Duff (ed.) - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, (...)
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  8. The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law.John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive handbook in the philosophy of criminal law. It contains seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the field and covers the field's major topics including limits to criminalization, obscenity and hate speech, blackmail, the law of rape, attempts, accomplice liability, causation, responsibility, justification and excuse, duress, provocation and self-defense, insanity, punishment, the death penalty, mercy, and preventive detention and other alternatives to punishment. It will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students whose (...)
     
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  9.  48
    Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law.John Gardner - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    The wrongness of rape -- Rationality and the rule of law in offences against the person -- Complicity and causality -- In defence of defences -- Justifications and reasons -- The gist of excuses -- Fletcher on offences and defences -- Provocation and pluralism -- The mark of responsibility -- The functions and justifications of criminal law and punishment -- Crime : in proportion and in perspective -- Reply to critics.
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  10. Fairness to Rightness: Jurisdiction, Legality, and the Legitimacy of International Criminal Law.David Luban - 2010 - In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press.
  11.  35
    Delegation of Powers and Authority in International Criminal Law.Shlomit Wallerstein - 2015 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (1):123-140.
    By what right, or under whose authority, do you try me? This is a common challenge raised by defendants standing trial in front of international criminal courts or tribunals. The challenge comes from the fact that traditionally criminal law is justified as a response of the state to wrongdoing that has been identified by the state as a crime. Nevertheless, since the early 1990s we have seen the development of international criminal tribunals that have the authority to (...)
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    Digging Up, Dismantling, and Redesigning the Criminal Law.Kimberley Brownlee - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):169-178.
    The criminal law raises wonderfully thorny foundational questions. Some of these questions are conceptual: What is a plausible conception of crime ? What is a plausible conception of criminal law ? Some of these questions are genealogical: What are the historical and genealogical roots of the criminal law in a particular jurisdiction? Other questions are evaluative: What are the political and moral values on which a given conception of criminal law depends? What kind of rational (...)
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    Ethics and Authority in International Law.Alfred P. Rubin - 1997 - Cambridge University Press.
    The specialised vocabularies of lawyers, ethicists, and political scientists obscure the roots of many real disagreements. In this book, the distinguished American international lawyer Alfred Rubin provides a penetrating account of where these roots lie, and argues powerfully that disagreements which have existed for 3,000 years are unlikely to be resolved soon. Current attempts to make 'war crimes' or 'terrorism' criminal under international law seem doomed to fail for the same reasons that attempts failed in the early nineteenth century (...)
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  14.  5
    Philosophy of Criminal Law.Douglas N. Husak - 1987 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    This volume collects 17 of Douglas Husak's influential essays in criminal law theory. The essays span Husak's original and provocative contributions to the central topics in the field, including the grounds of criminal liability, relative culpability, the role of defences, and the justification of punishment. The volume includes an extended introduction by the author, drawing together the themes of his work, and exploring the goals of criminal theory.
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  15.  13
    Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law.François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.) - 2012 - Hart Publishing.
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  16. On Crime, Punishment, and Psychiatric Care: An Introduction to Swedish Philosophy of Criminal Law and Forensic Psychiatry.Lennart Nordenfelt - 1992 - Almqvist & Wiksell International.
  17.  28
    The Philosophical Foundations of Extraterritorial Punishment.Alejandro Chehtman - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    This book provides the first full account, explanation, and critique of extraterritorial punishment in international law.
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  18.  25
    The Philosophy of Criminal Law: Extending the Debates. [REVIEW]Douglas Husak - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):351-365.
    Larry Alexander and Peter Westen each critically examine different topics from my recent collection of essays, The Philosophy of Criminal Law. Alexander focuses on my “Rapes Without Rapists,” “Mistake of Law and Culpability,” and “Already Punished Enough.” Westen offers a more extended commentary on my “Transferred Intent.” I briefly reply to each critic in turn and try to extend the debates in new directions.
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  19.  10
    What is Philosophy of Criminal Law?Youngjae Lee - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (3):671-685.
    Introduction: State-Centered and Individual-Centered TheoriesWhat is philosophy of criminal law? The seventeen essays in this book, as a whole, provide an excellent place to start in answering that question. Editors John Deigh and David Dolinko state that they put together this volume of “seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the philosophy of the criminal law” in order to create “an authoritative handbook” representing “the state of current research on the major topics in the field that (...)
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    Crimes Against Humanity in Colombia: The International Criminal Court's Jurisdiction Over the May 2003 Attack on the Betoyes Guahibo Indigenous Reserve and Colombian Accountability. [REVIEW]Aimee Bolletino - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (4):491-511.
    The Colombian military and the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) have committed systematic attacks against the Colombian people that violate international law. One such heinous incident took place in May 2003 at the Betoyes Guahibo indigenous reserve in Colombia. Unlike other acts of terror, the attack at the Reserve is well documented. Because of this, the attack on the Reserve is an excellent case for International Criminal Court (ICC) prosecution. This article exposes acts of cruelty and makes a (...)
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  21.  22
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy.Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy is the first anthology to bring together legal and philosophical theorists to examine the normative and conceptual foundations of international criminal law. In particular, through these essays the international group of authors addresses questions of state sovereignty; of groups, rather than individuals, as perpetrators and victims of international crimes; of international criminal law and the promotion of human rights and social justice; and of what comes after international criminal prosecutions, namely, (...)
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  22.  12
    European Criminal Law and European Identity.Mireille Hildebrandt - 2006 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (1):57-78.
  23. Criminal Law, Philosophy, and Psychology : Working at the Cross-Roads.Thomas A. Nadelhoffer - 2011 - In Leslie Green & Brian Leiter (eds.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
     
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  24.  5
    Gardner on the Philosophy of Criminal Law.Douglas Husak - 2009 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (1):169-187.
    Offences and Defences is an outstanding collection of eleven of John Gardner's previously published papers in the philosophy of criminal law. I briefly examine his views on five central issues: his claims about basic responsibility and whether it should be construed as relational; his positions on agent neutrality; his arguments about whether moral and criminal wrongs are typically strict; his thoughts about the structure of defences, and, finally, what his account of rape reveals about the content of (...)
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  25. Philosophy, Theory and Criminal Law.Jørn Jacobsen - 2014 - Jurisprudence: An International Journal of Legal and Political Thought 5 (1):209-216.
    Philosophy, Theory and Criminal Law: A Review of Fran?ois Tanguay-Renaud and James Stribopoulos , Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational and International Criminal Law.
     
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  26.  12
    Introduction: Political Philosophy and Criminal Justice. [REVIEW]Victor Tadros - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):179-184.
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    John Gardner: Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law. [REVIEW]Matt Matravers - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):231-235.
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  28. A Philosophy of Criminal Attempts.Bebhinn Donnelly-Lazarov - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    An investigation of criminal attempts unearths some of the most fundamental, intriguing and perplexing questions about criminal law and its place in human action. When does attempting begin? What is the relationship between attempting and intending? Do we always attempt the possible and, if so, possible to whom? Does attempting involve action and does action involve attempting? Is my attempt fixed by me or can another perspective reveal what it is? How 'much' action is needed for an attempt, (...)
     
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  29. Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique.R. A. Duff - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, (...)
     
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  30. Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law.S. Moore Michael - 2010 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In print for the first time in over ten years, Act and Crime provides a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both Anglo-American criminal law and the morality that underlies it. The book defends the view that human actions are always volitionally caused bodily movements and nothing else. The theory is used to illuminate three major problems in the drafting and the interpretation of criminal codes: 1) what the voluntary act requirement both does and should (...)
     
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  31.  13
    Intention, Agency and Criminal Liability: Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law.Anthony Kenny & R. A. Duff - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):378.
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  32.  1
    Intention, Agency and Criminal Liability: Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law.Robert W. Hoag - 1992 - Philosophical Books 33 (2):114-116.
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  33.  90
    Review of May & Hoskins, International Criminal Law and Philosophy[REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2010 - Concurring Opinions Blog:1.
  34. Douglas Husak , The Philosophy of Criminal Law . Reviewed By.Roger Shiner - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (1):30-32.
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    Stateless Crimes, Legitimacy, and International Criminal Law: The Case of Organ Trafficking. [REVIEW]Leslie P. Francis & John G. Francis - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):283-295.
    Organ trafficking and trafficking in persons for the purpose of organ transplantation are recognized as significant international problems. Yet these forms of trafficking are largely left out of international criminal law regimes and to some extent of domestic criminal law regimes as well. Trafficking of organs or persons for their organs does not come within the jurisdiction of the ICC, except in very special cases such as when conducted in a manner that conforms to the definitions of (...)
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  36. A History of the Criminal Law of England.James Fitzjames Stephen - 1996 - Routledge.
    As a practising lawyer and judge, it is the insights gained from Stephen's own experience that give an added practical dimension to this work. As well as his accounts of the history of the branches of the law, Stephen gives several fascinating analyses of famous trials, and explores the relation of madness to crime and the relation of law to ethics, physiology, and mental philosophy. His discussion also includes the subjects of criminal responsibility, offences against the state, the (...)
     
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  37. On Criminalization an Essay in the Philosophy of the Criminal Law.Jonathan Schonsheck - 1994
     
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  38.  12
    Duff, Antony, Ed. Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique.Keith Culver - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (2):442-443.
  39. Philosophy and the Criminal Law.Antony Duff & N. E. Simmonds (eds.) - 1984 - Steiner.
     
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  40.  21
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy.Mark R. Reiff - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (2):370-378.
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  41. Attempts: In the Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law.Gideon Yaffe - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Gideon Yaffe presents a ground-breaking work which demonstrates the importance of philosophy of action for the law. Many people are serving sentences not for completing crimes, but for trying to. Yaffe's clear account of what it is to try to do something promises to resolve the difficulties courts face in the adjudication of attempted crimes.
     
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  42.  3
    The New Philosophy of the Criminal Law Chad Flanders & Zachary Hoskins , 2016 New York, Rowman and Littlefield Vi + 276 Pp, £80 £24.95. [REVIEW]William Bülow - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):449-451.
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  43.  12
    The New Philosophy of the Criminal Law Chad Flanders & Zachary Hoskins , 2016 New York, Rowman and Littlefield Vi + 276 Pp, £80 £24.95. [REVIEW]William Bülow - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (4).
  44. The Philosophy of Criminal Law.Larry Alexander - 2004 - In Jules Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
     
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  45. Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and Its Implications for Criminal Law.Michael Moore - 1996 - Law and Philosophy 15 (3):293-306.
     
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  46.  19
    Attempts in the Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law – By Gideon Yaffe.Steven Tudor - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):84-86.
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  47.  1
    The New Philosophy of the Criminal Law Chad Flanders & Zachary Hoskins , 2016 New York, Rowman and Littlefield Vi + 276 Pp, £80 £24.95. [REVIEW]William Bülow - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (3):449-451.
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  48. Philosophy of Criminal Law.Larry Alexander - 2002 - In Jules Coleman & Scott J. Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press.
     
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  49. Antony Duff, Ed., Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique Reviewed By.William A. Edmundson - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19 (5):325-327.
     
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  50. The New Philosophy of Criminal Law.Chad Flanders & Zachary Hoskins (eds.) - 2015 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This volume is a collection of twelve new essays, authored by leading philosophers and legal theorists, examining the central conceptual and normative questions underlying our institutions of criminal law.
     
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