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David B. Hershenov [55]David Beryl Hershenov [1]
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  1.  63
    If Abortion, Then Infanticide.David B. Hershenov & Rose J. Hershenov - 2017 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 38 (5):387-409.
    Our contention is that all of the major arguments for abortion are also arguments for permitting infanticide. One cannot distinguish the fetus from the infant in terms of a morally significant intrinsic property, nor are they morally discernible in terms of standing in different relationships to others. The logic of our position is that if such arguments justify abortion, then they also justify infanticide. If we are right that infanticide is not justified, then such arguments will fail to justify abortion. (...)
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  2.  14
    The Fairness of Hell.David B. Hershenov - 2019 - Ratio 32 (3):215-223.
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  3.  89
    Who Doesn't Have a Problem of Too Many Thinkers?David B. Hershenov - 2013 - American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (2):203.
    Animalists accuse the advocates of psychological approaches of identity of having to suffer a Problem of Too Many Thinkers. Eric Olson, for instance, is an animalist who maintains that if the person is spatially coincident but numerically distinct from the animal, then provided that the person can use its brain to think, so too can the physically indistinguishable animal. However, not all defenders of psychological views of identity assume the spatial coincidence of the person and the animal. Jeff McMahan and (...)
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  4. Why Consent May Not Be Needed For Organ Procurement.James Delaney & David B. Hershenov - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):3-10.
    Most people think it is wrong to take organs from the dead if the potential donors had previously expressed a wish not to donate. Yet people respond differently to a thought experiment that seems analogous in terms of moral relevance to taking organs without consent. We argue that our reaction to the thought experiment is most representative of our deepest moral convictions. We realize not everyone will be convinced by the conclusions we draw from our thought experiment. Therefore, we point (...)
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  5. A Hylomorphic Account of Thought Experiments Concerning Personal Identity.David B. Hershenov - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (3):481-502.
    Hylomorphism offers a third way between animalist approaches to personal identity, which maintain that psychology is irrelevant to our persistence, andneo-Lockean accounts, which deny that humans are animals. This paper provides a Thomistic account that explains the intuitive responses to thought experiments involving brain transplants and the transformation of organic bodies into inorganic ones. This account does not have to follow the animalist in abandoning the claim that it is our identity which matters in survival, or countenance the puzzles of (...)
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  6.  85
    Do Dead Bodies Pose a Problem for Biological Approaches to Personal Identity?David B. Hershenov - 2001 - Mind 114 (453):31-59.
    One reason why the Biological Approach to personal identity is attractive is that it doesn’t make its advocates deny that they were each once a mindless fetus.[i] According to the Biological Approach, we are essentially organisms and exist as long as certain life processes continue. Since the Psychological Account of personal identity posits some mental traits as essential to our persistence, not only does it follow that we could not survive in a permanently vegetative state or irreversible coma, but it (...)
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  7.  86
    Personal Identity and Purgatory.David B. Hershenov & Rose Koch-Hershenov - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (4):439.
    If Purgatory involves just an immaterial soul undergoing a transformation between our death and resurrection, then, as Aquinas recognized, it won't be us in Purgatory. Drawing upon Parfit's ideas about identity not being what matters to us, we explore whether the soul's experience of Purgatory could still be beneficial to it as well as the deceased human who didn't experience the purging yet would possess the purged soul upon resurrection. We also investigate an alternative non-Thomistic hylomorphic account of Purgatory in (...)
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  8.  69
    Can There Be Spatially Coincident Entities of the Same Kind?David B. Hershenov - 2003 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):1-22.
    The majority of philosophers believe that the existence of spatially coincident entities is not only a coherent idea but that there are millions of such entities. What such philosophers do not countenance are spatially coincident entities of the same kind. We will call this ‘Locke’s.
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  9.  64
    A More Palatable Epicureanism.David B. Hershenov - 2007 - American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (2):171 - 180.
  10.  27
    Morally Relevant Potential.David B. Hershenov & Rose J. Hershenov - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (3):268-271.
  11. Persons as Proper Parts of Organisms.David B. Hershenov - 2005 - Theoria 71 (1):29-37.
    Defenders of the Psychological Approach to Personal Identity (PAPI) insist that the possession of some kind of mind is essential to us. We are essentially thinking beings, not living creatures. We would cease to exist if our capacity for thought was irreversibly lost due to a coma or permanent vegetative state. However, the onset of such conditions would not mean the death of an organism. It would survive in a mindless state. But this would appear to mean that before the (...)
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  12. The Metaphysical Problem of Intermittent Existence and the Possibility of Resurrection.David B. Hershenov - 2003 - Faith and Philosophy 20 (1):24-36.
    If one does not possess an immaterial and immortal soul, then the prospect of conscious experience after death would appear to depend upon the metaphysical possibility of the resurrection of one’s biological life.[i] By “resurrection,” I don’t mean just the possibility that a dead but still existing and well preserved individual could be brought back to life. My contention is that the human organism can even cease to exist, perhaps as a result of cremation or extensive decay, and yet still (...)
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  13.  84
    Soulless Organisms?: Hylomorphism Vs. Animalism.David B. Hershenov - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):465-482.
    It is worthwhile comparing Hylomorphic and Animalistic accounts of personal identity since they both identify the human animal and the human person.The topics of comparison will be three: The first is accounting for our intuitions in cerebrum transplant and irreversible coma cases. Hylomorphism, unlike animalism, appears to capture “commonsense” beliefs here, preserves the maxim that identity matters, and does not run afoul of the Only x and y rule. The next topic of comparison reveals how the rival explanations of transplants (...)
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  14. How Not to Defend the Unborn.David B. Hershenov & Philip Reed - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    It is sometimes proposed that killing or harming abortion providers is the only logically consistent position available to opponents of abortion. Since lethal violence against morally responsible attackers is normally viewed as justified in order to defend innocent parties, pro-lifers should also think so in the case of the abortion doctor and so they should act to defend the unborn. In our paper, we defend the mainstream pro-life view against killing abortion doctors. We argue that the pro-life view can, in (...)
     
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  15.  16
    Personal Identity and the Possibility of Autonomy.David B. Hershenov & Adam P. Taylor - 2017 - Dialectica 71 (2):155-179.
    We argue that animalism is the only materialist account of personal identity that can account for the autonomy that we typically think of ourselves as possessing. All the rival materialist theories suffer from a moral version of the problem of too many thinkers when they posit a human person that overlaps a numerically distinct human animal. The different persistence conditions of overlapping thinkers will lead them to have interests that conflict, which in many cases prevents them both from autonomously forming (...)
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  16. Personal Identity.David B. Hershenov - 2012 - In Robert Barnard Neil Manson (ed.), Continuum Companion to Metaphysics. pp. 198.
     
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  17.  61
    Olson's Embryo Problem.David B. Hershenov - 2002 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (4):502-511.
  18. Van Inwagen, Zimmerman, and the Materialist Conception of Resurrection.David B. Hershenov - 2002 - Religious Studies 38 (4):451-469.
    Peter van Inwagen's brand of materialism leads him to speculate that God actually removes the deceased at the moment of death and replaces the corpse with a simulacrum that decays or is cremated. Dean Zimmerman offers an account of resurrection that is loyal to Peter van Inwagen's commitment to a materialist metaphysics, with its stress on the earlier life processes of an organism immanently causing its later ones, while maintaining that resurrection is possible without involving God in any ‘body snatching’. (...)
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  19.  65
    Shoemaker’s Problem of Too Many Thinkers.David B. Hershenov - 2006 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:225-236.
    Shoemaker maintains that when a functionalist theory of mind is combined with his belief about individuating properties and the well-known cerebrumtransplant thought experiment, the resulting position will be a version of the psychological approach to personal identity that can avoid The Problem of Too Many Thinkers. I maintain that the costs of his solution—that the human animal is incapable of thought—are too high. Shoemaker also has not provided an argumentagainst there existing a merely conscious being that is not essentially self-conscious (...)
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  20.  14
    Restitution and Revenge.David B. Hershenov - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy 96 (2):79.
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  21.  11
    Health, Harm and Potential.David B. Hershenov & Rose J. Hershenov - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (1):189-196.
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  22.  27
    How a Hylomorphic Metaphysics Constrains the Abortion Debate.David B. Hershenov & Rose J. Koch - 2005 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 5 (4):751-764.
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  23. The Metaphysical Basis of a Liberal Organ Procurement Policy.David B. Hershenov & James J. Delaney - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (4):303-315.
    There remains a need to properly analyze the metaphysical assumptions underlying two organ procurement policies: presumed consent and organ sales. Our contention is that if one correctly understands the metaphysics of both the human body and material property, then it will turn out that while organ sales are illiberal, presumed consent is not. What we mean by illiberal includes violating rights of bodily integrity, property, or autonomy, as well as arguing for or against a policy in a manner that runs (...)
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  24.  36
    Organisms and Their Bodies: Response to LaPorte.David B. Hershenov - 2009 - Mind 118 (471):803-809.
    I argue that a corpse cannot be identified with an earlier living body, because it acquires and retains parts in different ways. Contrary to what Joseph LaPorte maintains, there can be neither one principle of part-assimilation nor a non-disjunctive account of persistence conditions that can establish the identity of a living body and a later corpse.
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  25.  45
    Split Brains: No Headache for the Soul Theorist.David B. Hershenov & Adam P. Taylor - 2014 - Religious Studies 50 (4):487-503.
    Split brains that result in two simultaneous streams of consciousness cut off from each other are wrongly held to be grounds for doubting the existence of the divinely created soul. The mistake is based on two related errors: first, a failure to appreciate the soul's dependence upon neurological functioning; second, a fallacious belief that if the soul is simple, i.e. without parts, then there must be a unity to its thought, all of its thoughts being potentially accessible to reflection or (...)
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  26.  76
    Abortions and Distortions: An Analysis of Morally Irrelevant Factors in Thomson's Violinist Thought Experiment.David B. Hershenov - 2001 - Social Theory and Practice 27 (1):129-148.
  27.  6
    Intelligence and the Philosophy of Mind.David B. Hershenov - 2006 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:225-236.
  28.  22
    Problems with a Constitution Account of Persons.David B. Hershenov - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (2):291.
    ABSTRACT: There are some problems with Lynne Baker’s constitution account of personal identity that become evident when we consider brain transplant thought experiments and two kinds of rare cases of conjoined twins — the first appears to be one organism but two persons and the second seems to involve two organisms associated with one person. To handle the problems arising from brain transplants, the constitution theorist must admit an additional level of constitution between the organism and the person. To resolve (...)
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  29.  14
    Death, Dignity, and Degradation.David B. Hershenov - 2007 - Public Affairs Quarterly 21 (1):21-36.
  30.  79
    Restitution and Revenge.David B. Hershenov - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy 96 (2):79-94.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a broad sketch of the advantages of the debt/atonement approach to punishment. Such an approach is appealing for it can benefit both the victim and the remorseful victimizer. Compared to other theories, it gives a fuller and more unified account of our intuitions about paying debts, doing penance, alleviating guilt, granting forgiveness, and offsetting privileges, pleasures and burdens. The theory also allows us to avoid justifying punishment on the basis of using some (...)
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  31. The Thesis of Vague Objects and Unger's Problem of the Many.David B. Hershenov - 2001 - Philosophical Papers 30 (1):57-67.
    Although the predominant view is that vagueness is due to our language being imprecise, the alternative idea that objects themselves do not have determinate borders has received an occasional hearing. But what has failed to be appreciated is how this idea can avoid a puzzle Peter Unger named “The Problem of the Many.”[i].
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  32.  20
    An Argument for Limited Human Cloning.David B. Hershenov - 2000 - Public Affairs Quarterly 14 (3):245-258.
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  33. The ‘I’M Personally Opposed to Abortion But...’ Argument.David B. Hershenov - 2009 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:77-87.
    One often hears Catholic and non-Catholic politicians and private citizens claim “I am personally opposed to abortion . . . ” but add that it is morally permissible for others to accept abortion. We consider a Rawlsian defense of this position based on the recognition that one’s opposition to abortion stems from acomprehensive doctrine which is incompatible with Public Reason. We examine a second defense of this position based upon respecting the autonomy of others and a third grounded in the (...)
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  34.  29
    The Limits of Liberal Tolerance: The Rights of Gays and Lesbians to Adopt.David B. Hershenov - 1995 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (2):27-34.
  35.  28
    A Puzzle About the Demands of Morality.David B. Hershenov - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 107 (3):275-289.
    Two thought experiments are provided which elicit whatappear to be opposing judgments about the demands of morality.One Unger-inspired thought experiment suggests that a personmust give up four decades of earnings just to save a singlelife. The other evokes the contrary intuition that onedoesn't have to labor forty years without compensation inorder to prevent the death of an individual. However,considerations of consistency do not demand that weabandon one of our intuitive responses. This is becausethere is a morally significant difference between thetwo (...)
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  36.  7
    The Problem of Potentiality.David B. Hershenov - 1999 - Public Affairs Quarterly 13 (3):255-271.
  37.  8
    Shoemaker’s Problem of Too Many Thinkers.David B. Hershenov - 2006 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:225-236.
    Shoemaker maintains that when a functionalist theory of mind is combined with his belief about individuating properties and the well-known cerebrumtransplant thought experiment, the resulting position will be a version of the psychological approach to personal identity that can avoid The Problem of Too Many Thinkers. I maintain that the costs of his solution—that the human animal is incapable of thought—are too high. Shoemaker also has not provided an argumentagainst there existing a merely conscious being that is not essentially self-conscious (...)
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  38.  9
    Abortions and Distortions: An Analysis of Morally Irrelevant Factors in Thomson’s Violinist Thought Experiment.David B. Hershenov - 2001 - Social Theory and Practice 27 (1):129-148.
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  39.  25
    Prussian Reproduction, Proper Function and Infertile Marriages.David B. Hershenov - 2015 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 63 (3):129-141.
    Alex Pruss argues that romantic love is a basic form of human love that is properly fulfilled in sex oriented towards reproduction. As a result, homoerotic sexual activity cannot obtain the proper consummation and therefore involves misunderstanding the other person’s nature and the possibility of union with them. Although same-sex sexual activity may feel like a consummation of romantic love, it is wrong to generate such a false experience in oneself or another. Presented is an apparent dilemma for Pruss’s thesis (...)
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  40.  38
    Scattered Artifacts.David B. Hershenov - 2002 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (2):211-216.
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  41.  72
    The Relevance of Metaphysics to the Morality of Abortion.David B. Hershenov & Rose J. Koch - manuscript
    Earl Conee has argued that the metaphysics of personal identity is irrelevant to the morality of abortion. He claims that doing all the substantial work in abortion arguments are moral principles and they garner no support from rival metaphysics theories. Conee argues that not only can both immaterialist and materialist theories of the self posit our origins at fertilization, but positing such a beginning doesn’t even have any significant impact on the permissibility of abortion. We argue that this thesis is (...)
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  42.  22
    Thomistic Principles and Bioethics, by Jason T. Eberl.David B. Hershenov - 2008 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (1):191-194.
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  43.  44
    The Memory Criterion and the Problem of Backward Causation.David B. Hershenov - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):181-185.
    Lockeans, as well as their critics, have pointed out that the memory criterion is likely to mean that none of us were ever fetuses or even infants due to the lack of direct psychological connections between then and now. But what has been overlooked is that the memory criterion leads to either backward causation and a violation of Locke’s own very plausible principle that we can have only one origin, or backward causation and a number of overlapping people where we (...)
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  44.  25
    Misunderstanding the Moral Equivalence of Killing and Letting Die.David B. Hershenov - 2008 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (2):239-244.
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  45.  47
    Restitution and Reconciliation.David B. Hershenov - unknown
    I. Introduction. The debt/atonement model of punishment seeks to reconcile the criminal with his direct victim, as well as the larger community, through restorative mechanisms of restitution and atonement.[i] As a result, it has certain advantages over better known rivals.[ii] Unlike retribution, reform and deterrence, the approach does some good, first and foremost, for the victim of the crime. But it can also benefit the victimizer and indirectly victimized members of the larger community. Competing theories usually profit but one of (...)
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  46.  46
    Lowe's Defence of Constitution and the Principle of Weak Extensionality.David B. Hershenov - 2008 - Ratio 21 (2):168–181.
    E.J. Lowe is one of the few philosophers who defend both the existence of spatially coincident entities and the Principle of Weak Extensionality that no two objects which have proper parts have exactly the same proper parts at the same time. Lowe maintains that when spatially coincident things like the statue and the lump of bronze are in a constitution relation, the constituted entity (the statue) has parts that the constituting entity (the lump) doesn’t, hence the compatibility with Weak Extensionality. (...)
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  47.  18
    Explaining the Psychological Appeal of Viability.David B. Hershenov - 2006 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 6 (4):681-686.
  48.  9
    The ‘I’M Personally Opposed to Abortion But...’ Argument.David B. Hershenov & Rose Hershenov - 2009 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:77-87.
    One often hears Catholic and non-Catholic politicians and private citizens claim “I am personally opposed to abortion... ” but add that it is morally permissible for others to accept abortion. We consider a Rawlsian defense of this position based on the recognition that one’s opposition to abortion stems from acomprehensive doctrine which is incompatible with Public Reason. We examine a second defense of this position based upon respecting the autonomy of others and a third grounded in the harm to the (...)
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  49.  17
    Perdure and Murder.David B. Hershenov - unknown
    The rich resources of the Four-Dimensional metaphysics have been brought to bear upon many traditional philosophical problems in recent years. Alas, the implications of Four-Dimensionalism for bioethics have gone largely unexplored. Hud Hudson is the rare exception. Relying upon a Four- Dimensional metaphysics of temporal parts and a belief in unrestricted composition, he argues that there is little reason to identify the perduring human embryonic animal and the perduring human person. He makes the intriguing claim that if abortion is wrong, (...)
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  50.  3
    Healthy Functioning as the Key to Fairness in a Divinely Determined World.David B. Hershenov - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-15.
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