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John W. Yolton [189]John William Yolton [1]
  1.  70
    Perceptual Acquaintance: From Descartes to Reid.John W. Yolton - 1984 - University of Minnesota Press.
    Rich with historical and cultural value, these works are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.
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  2.  45
    Thinking Matter: Materialism in Eighteenth-Century Britain.John W. Yolton - 1983 - University of Minnesota Press.
    This book, a reevaluation of a major issue in modern philosophy, explores the controversy that grew out of John Locke's suggestion, in the Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690), that God could give to matter the power of thought.
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  3.  57
    Gibson's realism.John W. Yolton - 1969 - Synthese 19 (3-4):400 - 407.
  4.  44
    Locke and the compass of human understanding.John W. Yolton - 1970 - Cambridge [Eng.]: University Press. Edited by John Locke.
    Professor Yolton delves into John Locke 's most important work, the Essay Concerning Human Understanding.
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  5.  13
    Perceiving: A Philosophical Study. Roderick M. Chisholm Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1957. Pp. xi, 203. $2.75.John W. Yolton - 1958 - Philosophy of Science 25 (4):302-305.
  6.  44
    Perception & reality: a history from Descartes to Kant.John W. Yolton - 1996 - Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
    In 1984, John W. Yolton published Perceptual Acquaintance from Descartes to Reid. His most recent book builds on that seminal work and greatly extends its relevance to issues in current philosophical debate. Perception and Reality examines the theories of perception implicit in the work of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophers which centered on the question: How is knowledge of the body possible? That question raises issues of mind-body relation, the way that mentality links with physicality, and the nature of the known (...)
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  7. Thinking Matter: Materialism in Eighteenth-Century Britain.John W. Yolton - 1984 - Philosophy 59 (230):554-555.
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  8. Locke and the Compass of Human Understanding. A Selective Commentary on the 'Essay'.John W. Yolton - 1970 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 32 (4):792-792.
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  9. Thinking Matter: Materialism in Eighteenth Century Britain.John W. Yolton - 1985 - Mind 94 (375):478-480.
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  10.  45
    On being present to the mind.John W. Yolton - 1975 - Dialogue 14 (3):373--88.
    I want to discuss a doctrine and a concept in theory of knowledge which has various manifestations from at least the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. The concept is that of direct or immediate cognition, the doctrine says that only what is like mind can be directly or immediately present to mind. This doctrine raises the question of how we can know things other than ourselves and our experiences: the concept of direct presence most usually had the consequence of (...)
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  11.  72
    Locke and French Materialism.John W. Yolton - 1991 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    This book tells for the first time the long and complex story of the involvement of Locke's suggestion that God could add to matter the power of thought in his Essay Concerning Human Understanding in the growth of French materialism. There is a discussion of the 'affaire de Prades', in which Locke's name was linked with a censored thesis at the Faculty of Theology in Paris. The similarities and differences between English "thinking matter" and the French "matiere pensante" of the (...)
  12. Ideas and knowledge in seventeenth-century philosophy.John W. Yolton - 1975 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (2):145-165.
  13. Perceptual Acquaintance from Descartes to Reid.John W. Yolton - 1985 - Mind 94 (374):300-302.
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  14.  14
    Leisure the Basis of Culture.John W. Yolton - 1953 - Philosophical Review 62 (1):151.
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  15. Locke and the Compass of Human Understanding.John W. Yolton - 1970 - Philosophy 47 (179):82-83.
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  16. John Locke and the way of ideas.John William Yolton - 1956 - Oxford,: Clarendon Press.
  17.  16
    Locke and the Way of Ideas.John W. Yolton - 1956 - Bristol, England: St. Augustine's Press.
    Yolton insists that Locke's Essay concerning Human Understanding marks the beginning of the great empirical tradition in British philosophy.
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  18.  33
    John Locke.John W. Yolton & D. J. O'Connor - 1953 - Philosophical Review 62 (3):458.
  19. Locke on the law of nature.John W. Yolton - 1958 - Philosophical Review 67 (4):477-498.
  20.  17
    As in a Looking-Glass: Perceptual Acquaintance in Eighteenth-Century Britain.John W. Yolton - 1979 - Journal of the History of Ideas 40 (2):207.
  21.  30
    Hume's Ideas.John W. Yolton - 1980 - Hume Studies 6 (1):1-25.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:HUME'S IDEAS In the eighteenth century, there was widespread acceptance of a physiological basis for cognition. Some writers even argued for a rather detailed correlation between awareness and physiological changes, suggesting that (a) the former could be adequately explained in terms of the latter or, in some few instances, (b) that the former are the latter. David Hartley may come to mind as fitting one or the other of (...)
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  22.  61
    The two intellectual worlds of John Locke: man, person, and spirits in the essay.John W. Yolton - 2004 - Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.
    Using his intimate knowledge of John Locke's writings, John W. Yolton shows that Locke comprehends 'human understanding' as a subset of a larger understanding ...
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  23.  23
    Agent Causality.John W. Yolton - 1966 - American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (1):14 - 26.
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  24.  77
    Is there a history of philosophy? Some difficulties and suggestions.John W. Yolton - 1986 - Synthese 67 (1):3 - 21.
    Philosophy as a separate discipline is a rather new phenomenon. This presents problems for our understanding of what constitutes the history of philosophy. Past writers often approached their concerns from a multi-disciplinary perspective; thus to understand them we have to do more than answer a contemporary set of issues. To that end, I suggest we attend to Locke's advice on how to read a text. Following this advice may permit us to avoid several puzzles which result from misreading a text.
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  25. John Locke and the Way of Ideas.John W. Yolton - 1956 - Philosophy 33 (125):175-176.
  26.  25
    A Locke dictionary.John W. Yolton - 1993 - Cambridge, MA, USA: Blackwell.
  27.  52
    Locke and the Compass of Human Understanding: A Selective Commentary on the 'Essay'.John W. Yolton - 1970 - Cambridge [Eng.]: Cambridge University Press. Edited by John Locke.
    The Essay Concerning Human Understanding is John Locke's most important work, and through this selective commentary, first published in 1970, Professor Yolton concentrates our attention on the more interesting and controversial of the doctrines in it. His method of interpretation is to ask very specific questions of the text in order to test the propriety of the philosophical labels traditionally applied to Locke, an approach which he believes yields surprising results. He looks afresh at the various discussions of essence, perception, (...)
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  28.  45
    Realism and Appearances: An Essay in Ontology.John W. Yolton - 2000 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses one of the fundamental topics in philosophy: the relation between appearance and reality. John Yolton draws on a rich combination of historical and contemporary material, ranging from the early modern period to present-day debates, to examine this central philosophical preoccupation, which he presents in terms of distinctions between phenomena and causes, causes and meaning, and persons and man. He explores in detail how Locke, Berkeley and Hume talk of appearances and their relation to reality, and offers illuminating (...)
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  29. A Locke Dictionary.John W. Yolton - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):581-582.
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  30.  6
    Locke and the Seventeenth-Century Logic of Ideas.John W. Yolton - 1955 - Journal of the History of Ideas 16 (4):431-452.
    In politics, religion, and in , came to stand, in the minds of most men, for all that was bad and harmful to past tra- dition. The attempted reduction of knowledge and into matter and motion alarmed many men who were concerned to estab- lish the.
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  31.  72
    The concept of experience in Locke and Hume.John W. Yolton - 1963 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 1 (1):53-71.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Concept of Experience in Locke and Hume JOHN W. YOLTON THE EMPIRICISTPROGRAM has been designed to show that all conscious experience "comes from" unconscious encounters with the environment, and that all intellectual contents (concepts, ideas) derive from some conscious experiential component. Some empiricists, but not all, have also argued that experience reports about the world. A strict empiricism would have to reject this latter claim, as Hume did, (...)
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  32.  26
    Perception and Reality: A History from Descartes to Kant.Nancy Kendrick & John W. Yolton - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (2):332.
    This book does several things, and it does them all well. Yolton firmly contextualizes the debates about perception within the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, while showing how these debates are often repeated in contemporary philosophy of mind. Along the way, he provides novel interpretations of Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant that are clearly and convincingly presented. Perhaps the most important feature of his treatment is that it so vividly shows the Moderns grappling with issues about perception that continue to (...)
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  33.  18
    Politique et Philosophie chez Thomas Hobbes.John W. Yolton - 1955 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15 (3):431-432.
  34.  9
    The Liberal Politics of John Locke.M. Seliger, James L. Axtell, John Dunn & John W. Yolton - 1968 - Philosophy 45 (173):244-249.
  35. Perception and Reality: A History from Descartes to Kant.John W. Yolton - 1998 - Philosophical Quarterly 48 (193):540-542.
  36. Realism and Appearances: An Essay in Ontology.John W. Yolton - 2000 - Philosophy 77 (300):287-291.
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  37.  43
    The ontological status of sense-data in Plato's theory of perception.John W. Yolton - 1949 - Review of Metaphysics 3 (1):21-58.
    It is important for our purposes to notice that in this first reduction of Theætetus' definition of knowledge as perception, Plato has introduced the distinction between sense object and physical object, for he has specifically said, "when the same wind is blowing, one of us feels chilly, the other does not." In using this example. Plato has, as Cornford observes, raised the question of how the several sense objects are related to the single physical object. This question is one of (...)
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  38.  4
    Locke, an introduction.John W. Yolton - 1985 - New York, NY, USA: Blackwell.
    Studie over leven en werk van de Engelse wijsgeer en opvoedkundige (1632-1704).
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  39.  10
    John Locke: problems and perspectives.John W. Yolton - 1969 - London,: Cambridge University Press.
    The essays reflect Locke's position as a polymath and recontextualise his ideas through the juxtaposition of various academic approaches.
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  40.  11
    Logique et Existence.John W. Yolton - 1953 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 8 (3):327-328.
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  41.  11
    Logique et Existence. Essai sur la Logique de Hegel.John W. Yolton - 1953 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 14 (2):273-275.
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  42.  33
    Locke's Man.John W. Yolton - 2001 - Journal of the History of Ideas 62 (4):665-683.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Ideas 62.4 (2001) 665-683 [Access article in PDF] Locke's Man John W. Yolton Much attention has been paid to Locke's discussion of personal identity, his concept of person, the distinction between man and person. In fact, in that discussion there are four terms or concepts: man, self, person, and agent. Around those terms a number of themes, aspects of Locke's thought, are clustered, some (...)
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  43.  10
    David Hume.John W. Yolton & A. H. Basson - 1959 - Journal of Philosophy 56 (12):545.
  44. Locke, An Introduction.John W. Yolton & Peter Alexander - 1986 - Philosophical Quarterly 36 (144):420-429.
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  45. Locke's Concept of Experience.John W. Yolton - 1968 - In C. B. Martin & David M. Armstrong (eds.), Locke and Berkeley. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 40--52.
     
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  46.  48
    The metaphysic of en-soi and pour-soi.John W. Yolton - 1951 - Journal of Philosophy 48 (18):548-556.
  47. Philosophical realism and psychological data.John W. Yolton - 1958 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 19 (4):486-501.
  48.  18
    Metaphysical analysis.John W. Yolton - 1967 - [Toronto]: University of Toronto Press.
  49.  18
    The Locke Reader: Selections From the Works of John Locke with a General Introduction and Commentary.John W. Yolton - 1977 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by John W. Yolton.
    John Yolton seeks to allow readers of Locke to have accessible in one volume sections from a wide range of Locke's books, structured so that some of the interconnections of his thought can be seen and traced. Although Locke did not write from a system of philosophy, he did have in mind an overall division of human knowledge. The readings begin with Locke's essay on Hermeneutics and the portions of his Essay Concerning Human Understanding on how to read a text. (...)
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  50.  11
    The philosophy of science of A.S. Eddington.John W. Yolton - 1960 - The Hague,: M. Nijhoff.
    En 1956, l' Academie Internationale de Philosophie des Sciences couronnait, a Bruxeiles, 1'etude de M. Yolton, intitulee The Phi­ losophy o/Science 0/ Arthur S. Eddington, etude dont le present ouvrage est la reprise. Pourquoi la personne, 1'oeuvre et les idees de l'illustre physicien anglais avaient-elles ete designees a l'atten­ tion des candidats a ce Prix? Quels enseignements l'Academie Internationale de Philosophie des Sciences en attendait-eile? N'esperait-elle pas que le rapport de la recherche philosophique a la recherche scientifique pourrait en etre (...)
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