Results for 'moral emotion'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1.  10
    Moral Emotions: Reclaiming the Evidence of the Heart.Anthony J. Steinbock - 2014 - Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press.
    Moral Emotions builds upon the philosophical theory of persons begun in _Phenomenology and Mysticism _and marks a new stage of phenomenology. Author Anthony J. Steinbock finds personhood analyzing key emotions, called moral emotions. _Moral Emotions _offers a systematic account of the moral emotions, described here as pride, shame, and guilt as emotions of self-givenness; repentance, hope, and despair as emotions of possibility; and trusting, loving, and humility as emotions of otherness. The author argues these reveal basic structures (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  2. Moral emotions.Jesse J. Prinz & Shaun Nichols - 2010 - In John Michael Doris (ed.), Moral Psychology Handbook. Oxford University Press. pp. 111.
  3. The Moral Emotions.Jesse Prinz - 2009 - In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  4. Moral Emotions.Kevin Mulligan - unknown
    Emotions are said to be moral, as opposed to non- moral, in virtue of their objects. They are also said to be moral, for example morally good, as opposed to immoral, for example morally bad or evil, in virtue of their objects, nature, motives, functions or effects. The definition and content of moral matters are even more contested and contestable than the nature of emotions and of other affective phenomena. At the very least we should distinguish (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Moral emotions.Ronald de Sousa - 2001 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):109-126.
    Emotions can be the subject of moral judgments; they can also constitute the basis for moral judgments. The apparent circularity which arises if we accept both of these claims is the central topic of this paper: how can emotions be both judge and party in the moral court? The answer I offer regards all emotions as potentially relevant to ethics, rather than singling out a privileged set of moral emotions. It relies on taking a moderate position (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  6.  55
    Moral Emotions and Thick Ethical Concepts.Sunny Yang - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:469-479.
    My aim in this paper is to illuminate the limitations of adopting thick ethical concepts to support the rationality of moral emotion. To this end, I shall first of all concentrate on whether emotions, especially moral emotions are thick concepts and can be analysed into both evaluative and descriptive components. Secondly,I shall examine Gibbard’s thesis that to judge an act wrong is to think guilt and anger warranted. I then raise the following question. If we identify (...) considerations with anger in particular, it overly emphasizes one seemingly arbitrary emotion. In other words, I doubt whether ‘other’s anger’ can be the general concept corresponding to thick concepts such as courage or generosity. My doubt about the objectivity of Gibbard’s moral emotion depends on Bernard Williams’doubt about ethical objectivity in terms of a critical notice of the distinction between thick and thin ethical concepts. Finally, I shall pose a challenge to the distinction between thick and thin ethical concepts on the ground that it is not in fact a clear one. I shall argue that it is impossible clearly to classify various ethical concepts either as thick or thin. This is because, I shall argue, as Scheffler points out, “any division of ethical concepts into the two categories of the thick and the thin is itself a considerable oversimplication.” Indeed, I shall argue, our ethical vocabulary is tragically rich with an irreconcilable plurality of values. If my analysis is right, I argue Gibbard’s attempt to appeal to thick concepts to explain the rationality of moral emotion is open to question. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Moral Emotions and Unnamed Wrongs: Revisiting Epistemic Injustice.Usha Nathan - 2023 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 9 (29).
    Current discussions of hermeneutical injustice, I argue, poorly characterise the cognitive state of victims by failing to account for the communicative success that victims have when they describe their experience to other similarly situated persons. I argue that victims, especially when they suffer moral wrongs that are yet unnamed, are able (1) to grasp certain salient aspects of the wrong they experience and (2) to cultivate the ability to identify instances of the wrong in virtue of moral emotions. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Educating Moral Emotions or Moral Selves: A false dichotomy?Kristján Kristjánsson - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):397-409.
    In the post‐Kohlbergian era of moral education, a ‘moral gap’ has been identified between moral cognition and moral action. Contemporary moral psychologists lock horns over how this gap might be bridged. The two main contenders for such bridge‐building are moral emotions and moral selves. I explore these two options from an Aristotelian perspective. The moral‐self solution relies upon an anti‐realist conception of the self as ‘identity’, and I dissect its limitations. In its (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9. Introduction: Moral Emotions.Florian Cova, Julien Deonna & David Sander - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):397-400.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  10.  75
    Punishment and the Moral Emotions: Essays in Law, Morality, and Religion.Jeffrie G. Murphy - 2012 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    The essays in this collection explore, from philosophical and religious perspectives, a variety of moral emotions and their relationship to punishment and condemnation or to decisions to lessen punishment or condemnation.
  11.  16
    Moral Emotions and Morals.Rocío Orsi Portalo - 2006 - Ideas Y Valores 55 (131):33-50.
    My aim in this paper is to explore the ambivalent role played by the so called moral emotions in moral thinking, overall when the concept of responsibility is concerned. In the first part of this paper I show how moral emotions such as guilt and shame can appear in circumstances that are not under the agent’s control, and therefore the agent could be though of free or responsibility for them. By contrast, in the second part of this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  14
    Judging passions: moral emotions in persons and groups.Roger Giner-Sorolla - 2012 - New York: Psychology Press.
    Psychological research shows that our emotions and feelings often guide the moral decisions we make about our own lives and the social groups to which we belong. But should we be concerned that out important moral judgments can be swayed by "hot" passions, such as anger, disgust, guilt, shame and sympathy? Aren't these feelings irrational and counterproductive? Using a functional conflict theory of emotions (FCT), Giner-Sorolla proposes that each emotion serves a number of different functions, sometimes inappropriately, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13.  14
    Are Moral Emotions Key to Informed Risk Decisions? A Commentary on Sabine Roeser, Risk, Technology, and Moral Emotions.Madeleine Hayenhjelm - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 2020 (4):1-12.
    [Book symposium] Are Moral Emotions Key to Informed Risk Decisions? : A Commentary on Sabine Roeser, Risk, Technology, and Moral Emotions.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  99
    Moral Emotions.Ronald de Sousa - 2001 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):109 - 126.
    Emotions can be the subject of moral judgments; they can also constitute the basis for moral judgments. The apparent circularity which arises if we accept both of these claims is the central topic of this paper: how can emotions be both judge and party in the moral court? The answer I offer regards all emotions as potentially relevant to ethics, rather than singling out a privileged set of moral emotions. It relies on taking a moderate position (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  15. Morality Emotion, Perception, and Belief.Robert Gay - 1986
  16.  83
    Moral Emotions and Unethical Bargaining: The Differential Effects of Empathy and Perspective Taking in Deterring Deceitful Negotiation. [REVIEW]Taya R. Cohen - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):569-579.
    Two correlational studies tested whether personality differences in empathy and perspective taking differentially relate to disapproval of unethical negotiation strategies, such as lies and bribes. Across both studies, empathy, but not perspective taking, discouraged attacking opponents' networks, misrepresentation, inappropriate information gathering, and feigning emotions to manipulate opponents. These results suggest that unethical bargaining is more likely to be deterred by empathy than by perspective taking. Study 2 also tested whether individual differences in guilt proneness and shame proneness inhibited the endorsement (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  17. Educating moral emotions: a praxiological analysis. [REVIEW]Bruce Maxwell & Roland Reichenbach - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 26 (2):147-163.
    This paper presents a praxiological analysis of three everyday educational practices or strategies that can be considered as being directed at the moral formation of the emotions. The first consists in requests to imagine other's emotional reactions. The second comprises requests to imitate normative emotional reactions and the third to re-appraise the features of a situation that are relevant to an emotional response. The interest of these categories is not just that they help to organize and recognize the significance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  18.  17
    Moral emotions, principles, and the locus of moral perception.Joseph E. Corbi - 2006 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 2 (2):61-80.
    I vindicate the thrust of the particularist position in moral deliberation. this purpose, I focus on some elements that seem to play a crucial role in first-person moral deliberation and argue that they cannot be incorporated into a more sophisticated system of moral principles. More specifically, I emphasize some peculiarities of moral perception in the light of which I defend the irreducible deliberative relevance of a certain phenomenon, namely: the phenomenon of an agent morally coming across (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19.  19
    Moral Emotions and Corporate Psychopathy: A Review.Benjamin R. Walker & Chris J. Jackson - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (4):797-810.
    While psychopathy research has been growing for decades, a relatively new area of research is corporate psychopathy. Corporate psychopaths are simply psychopaths working in organizational settings. They may be attracted to the financial, power, and status gains available in senior positions and can cause considerable damage within these roles from a manipulative interpersonal style to large-scale fraud. Based upon prior studies, we analyze psychopathy research pertaining to 23 moral emotions classified according to functional quality and target. Based upon our (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20.  42
    Moral Emotions from the Frog’s Eye View.Fiery A. Cushman - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):261-263.
    To understand the structure of moral emotions poses a difficult challenge. For instance, why do liberals and conservatives see some moral issues similarly, but others starkly differently? Or, why does punishment depend on accidental variation in the severity of a harmful outcome, while judgments of wrongfulness or character do not? To resolve the complex design of morality, it helps to think in functional terms. Whether through learning, cultural evolution or natural selection, moral emotions will tend to guide (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21.  14
    Wrongdoing and the Moral Emotions.Derk Pereboom - 2021 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Wrongdoing and the Moral Emotions provides an account of how we might effectively address wrongdoing given challenges to the legitimacy of anger and retribution that arise from ethical considerations and from concerns about free will. The issue is introduced in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 asks how we might conceive of blame without retribution, and proposes an account of blame as moral protest, whose function is to secure forward-looking goals such as the moral reform of the wrongdoer and (...)
  22. Moral emotions and emotional dispositions.Lyndon E. Garrett - 2014 - In Bradley R. Agle, David W. Hart, Jeffery A. Thompson & Hilary M. Hendricks (eds.), Research companion to ethical behavior in organizations: constructs and measures. Edward Elgar.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Moral emotions as evaluations and their role in decision making.Łukasz Kurek - 2011 - In Jerzy Stelmach & Wojciech Załuski (eds.), Game Theory and the Law. Copernicus Center Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  3
    Moral emotions underlie puritanical morality.Ruida Zhu & Chao Liu - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e321.
    Fitouchi et al. illustrate the cognitive and evolutionary foundations of puritanical morality, while leave the emotional foundation unclear. We complement their theory by proposing moral emotions (e.g., guilt and shame) as characteristic emotions underlying puritanical morality. Our proposition is based on the findings that these moral emotions emerge after violations of puritanical norms and promote self-control and cooperation.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The Impact of Moral Emotions on Cause-Related Marketing Campaigns: A Cross-Cultural Examination.Jae-Eun Kim & Kim K. P. Johnson - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):79-90.
    This research was focused on investigating why some consumers might support cause-related marketing campaigns for reasons other than personal benefit by examining the influence of moral emotions and cultural orientation. The authors investigated the extent to which moral emotions operate differently across a cultural variable (US versus Korea) and an individual difference variable (self-construal). A survey method was utilised. Data were collected from a convenience sample of US ( n = 180) and Korean ( n = 191) undergraduates. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  26.  30
    Moral emotions and the envisaging of mitigating circumstances for wrongdoing.Jared Piazza, Pascale Sophie Russell & Paulo Sousa - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (4):707-722.
  27.  28
    Moral Emotions.Georg Spielthenner - 2004 - Disputatio 1 (17):1 - 13.
    Moral emotions have been badly neglected by philosophical ethics. In my view to the detriment of this discipline because they are not only important for the moral evaluation of persons but also for value theory and thus also for a theory of morally right actions. This paper outlines my account of moral emotions. Emotions such as regret or shame are sometimes but not always moral emotions. I will determine when they are moral emotions. In I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  2
    Moral Emotion in Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality - in the Case of 'Ressentiment' and 'Cheerfulness’. 서광열 - 2018 - Journal of the Daedong Philosophical Association 85:97-125.
    The purpose of this thesis is to examine two moral emotions(‘ressentiment' and 'cheerfulness’) in Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morality. In “the first essay”, Nietzsche analyzes 'ressentiment' as the moral emotion of the weak and explains how the weak have succeeded in the inversion of values. However, Nietzsche considers that 'ressentiment' have played a negative role in harming human health from the perspective of the value of life. The feeling of the incompetence inherent in 'ressentiment', at first, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  45
    Moral Emotions, Awareness, and Spiritual Freedom in the Thought of Zhu Xi.Kai Marchal - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (3):199-220.
    It is well known that the Neo-Confucian thinker Zhu Xi particularly emphasizes the role of emotions in human life. This paper shows that the four ‘moral emotions’ are central to Zhu's thinking, insofar as only their genuine actualization enables the individual to achieve spiritual freedom. Moreover, I discuss the crucial notions of ‘awareness’/‘perception’ and ‘knowledge’/‘wisdom’, in order to reveal the complex dynamic that moral emotions are said to create in the moral agent. I also analyse two important (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  47
    Moral Emotions: Reclaiming the Evidence of the Heart, by Anthony J. Steinbock.Kyle David Bennett - 2015 - Faith and Philosophy 32 (3):358-362.
  31.  67
    A Developmental Perspective on Moral Emotions.Tina Malti & Sebastian P. Dys - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):453-459.
    This article outlines a developmental approach to the study of moral emotions. Specifically, we describe our developmental model on moral emotions, one in which emotions and cognitions about morality get increasingly integrated and coordinated with development, while acknowledging inter-individual variation in developmental trajectories across the lifespan. We begin with a conceptual clarification of the concept of moral emotions. After a brief review of our own developmental approach to the study of moral emotions, we provide a selective (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32.  5
    Risk, Technology, and Moral Emotions.Sabine Roeser - 2017 - New York: Routledge.
    Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- 1 Introduction: Risk and Emotions -- PART I Risk Debates, Stalemates, Values and Emotions -- 2 Emotions and Values in Current Approaches to Decision Making About Risk -- 3 Risk Perception, Intuitions and Values -- PART II Reasonable Risk Emotions -- 4 Risk Emotions: The 'Affect Heuristic', its Biases and Beyond -- 5 The Philosophy of Moral Risk Emotions: Toward a New Paradigm of Risk Emotions -- PART (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  33.  22
    Moral Emotions: Reclaiming the Evidence of the Heart. By Anthony J. Steinbock. Pp. xii, 341, Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2014, $ 89.95/$34.95. [REVIEW]Antonio Calcagno - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (2):355-356.
  34.  52
    Moral Emotions and Intuitions. By Sabine Roeser. (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Pp. Xvii + 207. Price £55.).Peter Goldie - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):204-206.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  11
    Moral Emotions: Reclaiming the Evidence of the Heart. By Anthony J. Steinbock. Pp. xii, 341, Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2014, $89.95/$34.95. [REVIEW]Antonio Calcagno - 2018 - Heythrop Journal 59 (4):755-756.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  91
    Dimensions of Moral Emotions.Kurt Gray & Daniel M. Wegner - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):258-260.
    Anger, disgust, elevation, sympathy, relief. If the subjective experience of each of these emotions is the same whether elicited by moral or nonmoral events, then what makes moral emotions unique? We suggest that the configuration of moral emotions is special—a configuration given by the underlying structure of morality. Research suggests that people divide the moral world along the two dimensions of valence (help/harm) and moral type (agent/patient). The intersection of these two dimensions gives four (...) exemplars—heroes, villains, victims and beneficiaries—each of which elicits unique emotions. For example, victims (harm/patient) elicit sympathy and sadness. Dividing moral emotions into these four quadrants provides predictions about which emotions reinforce, oppose and complement each other. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  37. The Creeps as a Moral Emotion.Jeremy Fischer & Rachel Fredericks - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7:191-217.
    Creepiness and the emotion of the creeps have been overlooked in the moral philosophy and moral psychology literatures. We argue that the creeps is a morally significant emotion in its own right, and not simply a type of fear, disgust, or anger (though it shares features with those emotions). Reflecting on cases, we defend a novel account of the creeps as felt in response to creepy people. According to our moral insensitivity account, the creeps is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. Love as a moral emotion.J. David Velleman - 1999 - Ethics 109 (2):338-374.
  39.  18
    The importance of moral emotions for effective collaboration in culturally diverse healthcare teams.Catherine Cook & Margaret Brunton - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (2):e12214.
    Moral emotions shape the effectiveness of culturally diverse teams. However, these emotions, which are integral to determining ethically responsive patient care and team relationships, typically go unrecognised. The contribution of emotions to moral deliberation is subjugated within the technorational environment of healthcare decision‐making. Contemporary healthcare organisations rely on a multicultural workforce charged with the ethical care of vulnerable people. Limited extant literature examines the role of moral emotions in ethical decision‐making among culturally diverse healthcare teams. Moral (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Uncertainty, risk and moral emotions.Sabine Roeser - 2014 - The Philosophers' Magazine 66:106-111.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Self-respect: Moral, emotional, political.Robin S. Dillon - 1997 - Ethics 107 (2):226-249.
  42.  47
    Varieties of Moral Emotional Experience.Hanah A. Chapman & Adam K. Anderson - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):255-257.
    Although much research on emotion and morality has treated emotion as a relatively undifferentiated construct, recent work shows that moral transgressions can evoke a variety of distinct emotions. To accommodate these results, we propose a multiple-appraisal model in which distinct appraisals lead to different moral emotions. The implications of this model for our understanding of the relationship between appraisals, emotions and judgments are discussed. The complexity of moral emotional experience presents a methodological challenge to researchers, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  43.  12
    Moral Emotions: Reclaiming the Evidence of the Heart. By Anthony J. Steinbock.David Markwell - 2016 - Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):58-60.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  11
    An Attributional Analysis of Moral Emotions: Naïve Scientists and Everyday Judges.Udo Rudolph & Nadine Tscharaktschiew - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):344-352.
    This article provides an analysis of moral emotions from an attributional point of view, guided by the metaphors of man as a naïve scientist (Heider, 1958) and as a moral judge (Weiner, 2006). The theoretical analysis focuses on three concepts: (a) The distinction between the actor and the observer, (b) the functional quality of moral emotions, and (c) the perceived controllability of the causes of events. Moral emotions are identified (admiration, anger, awe, contempt, disgust, elevation, embarrassment, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  45.  2
    Educating Moral Emotions.Debra Shogan - 1988 - Paideusis: Journal of the Canadian Philosophy of Education Society 2 (1):15-28.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Respect as a moral emotion: A phenomenological approach.John J. Drummond - 2006 - Husserl Studies 22 (1):1-27.
  47.  56
    Reid and Moral Emotions.Sabine Roeser - 2009 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (2):177-192.
    The name of Thomas Reid rarely appears in discussions of the history of moral thought. This is a pity, since Reid has a lot of interesting ideas that can contribute to the current discussions in meta-ethics. Reid can be understood as an ethical intuitionist. What makes his account especially interesting is the role affective states play in his intuitionist theory. Reid defends a cognitive theory of moral emotions. According to Reid, there are moral feelings that are the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  48.  10
    Kingian Personalism, Moral Emotions, and Emersonian Perfectionism.J. Edward Hackett - 2020 - The Acorn 20 (1-2):55-86.
    In “Moral Perfectionism,” an essay in To Shape a New World, Paul C. Taylor explicitly mentions and openly avoids King’s personalism while advancing a type of Emersonian moral perfectionism motivated by a less than adequate reconstruction of King’s project. In this essay, I argue this is a mistake on two fronts. First, Taylor’s moral perfectionism gives pride of place to shame and self-loathing where the work of King makes central use of love. Second, by evading the personalist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Punishment and the Moral Emotions: Essays in Law, Morality, and Religion, by Jeffrie G. Murphy. [REVIEW]Thomas E. Hill Jr - 2013 - Faith and Philosophy 30 (4):490-493.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  4
    Kingian Personalism, Moral Emotions, and Emersonian Perfectionism.J. Edward Hackett - 2020 - The Acorn 20 (1-2):55-86.
    In “Moral Perfectionism,” an essay in To Shape a New World, Paul C. Taylor explicitly mentions and openly avoids King’s personalism while advancing a type of Emersonian moral perfectionism motivated by a less than adequate reconstruction of King’s project. In this essay, I argue this is a mistake on two fronts. First, Taylor’s moral perfectionism gives pride of place to shame and self-loathing where the work of King makes central use of love. Second, by evading the personalist (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000