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Siblings:History/traditions: Sovereignty
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  1. Mathew Abbott (2012). No Life is Bare, the Ordinary is Exceptional: Giorgio Agamben and the Question of Political Ontology. Parrhesia 14:23-36.
    In this article I develop a theory of political ontology, working to differentiate it from traditional political philosophy and Schmittian political theology. As with political theology, political ontology has its primary grounding not in disinterested contemplation from the standpoint of pure reason, but rather in a confrontation with an existential problem. Yet while for Schmitt this is the problem of how to live and think in obedience to God, the problem for political ontology is the question of being. Thus the (...)
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  2. Arash Abizadeh (2012). On the Demos and its Kin: Nationalism, Democracy, and the Boundary Problem. American Political Science Review 106 (4):867-882.
    Cultural-nationalist and democratic theory both seek to legitimize political power via collective self-rule: their principle of legitimacy refers right back to the very persons over whom political power is exercised. But such self-referential theories are incapable of jointly solving the distinct problems of legitimacy and boundaries, which they necessarily combine, once it is assumed that the self-ruling collectivity must be a pre-political, in-principle bounded, ground of legitimacy. Cultural nationalism claims that political power is legitimate insofar as it expresses the nation’s (...)
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  3. Arash Abizadeh (2010). Closed Borders, Human Rights, and Democratic Legitimation. In David Hollenbach (ed.), Driven From Home: Human Rights and the New Realities of Forced Migration. Georgetown University Press.
    Critics of state sovereignty have typically challenged the state’s right to close its borders to foreigners by appeal to the liberal egalitarian discourse of human rights. According to the liberty argument, freedom of movement is a basic human right; according to the equality or justice argument, open borders are necessary to reduce global poverty and inequality, both matters of global justice. I argue that human rights considerations do indeed mandate borders considerably more open than is the norm today but that, (...)
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  4. Arash Abizadeh (2008). Democratic Theory and Border Coercion: No Right to Unilaterally Control Your Own Borders. Political Theory 36 (1):37-65.
    The question of whether or not a closed border entry policy under the unilateral control of a democratic state is legitimate cannot be settled until we first know to whom the justification of a regime of control is owed. According to the state sovereignty view, the control of entry policy, including of movement, immigration, and naturalization, ought to be under the unilateral discretion of the state itself: justification for entry policy is owed solely to members. This position, however, is inconsistent (...)
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  5. E. L. Allen (1951). The Sovereignty of God and the Word of God. New York, Philosophical Library.
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  6. Andrew Arato & Jean Cohen (2009). Banishing the Sovereign? Internal and External Sovereignty in Arendt. Constellations 16 (2):307-330.
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  7. C. Armstrong (forthcoming). Against "Permanent Sovereignty" Over Natural Resources. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-14523080.
    The doctrine of permanent sovereignty over natural resources is a hugely consequential one in the contemporary world, appearing to grant nation-states both jurisdiction-type rights and rights of ownership over the resources to be found in their territories. But the normative justification for that doctrine is far from clear. This article elucidates the best arguments that might be made for permanent sovereignty, including claims from national improvement of or attachment to resources, as well as functionalist claims linking resource rights to key (...)
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  8. Stephen Arons (1984). Playing Ball with the Rodriguez Court: Three Strikes and You're Out - Comments on Kenneth A. Strike's “Fiscal Justice and Judicial Sovereignty”. Educational Theory 34 (1):23-27.
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  9. Charles Barbour & George Pavlich (eds.) (2010). After Sovereignty: On the Question of Political Beginnings. Routledge.
    Addressing the three dominant contemporary attitudes towards sovereignty - Sovereignty Renewed; Sovereignty Rethought; Sovereignty Rejected - After Sovereignty ...
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  10. Anne F. Bayefsky (1996). Cultural Sovereignty, Relativism, and International Human Rights: New Excuses for Old Strategies. Ratio Juris 9 (1):42-59.
  11. Endre Begby (2003). Liberty, Statehood and Sovereignty: Walzer on Mill on Non-Intervention. Journal of Military Ethics 2 (1):46-62.
    The purpose of this paper is to critically assess Michael Walzer's use of John Stuart Mill's text 'A Few Words on Non-Intervention' in his seminal work Just and Unjust Wars. Although point by point, I think Walzer's reading of Mill is largely sound, I will argue that the specific narrative into which Walzer orders these points places a highly tendentious spin on the original text. More precisely, Walzer's way of articulating the negative aspects of Mill's argument--the general presumption against intervention--obscures (...)
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  12. Frederick C. Beiser (1996). The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defense of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment. Princeton University Press.
    The Sovereignty of Reason is a survey of the rule of faith controversy in seventeenth-century England. It examines the arguments by which reason eventually became the sovereign standard of truth in religion and politics, and how it triumphed over its rivals: Scripture, inspiration, and apostolic tradition. Frederick Beiser argues that the main threat to the authority of reason in seventeenth-century England came not only from dissident groups but chiefly from the Protestant theology of the Church of England. The triumph of (...)
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  13. R. Bellamy & D. Castiglione (1997). Building the Union: The Nature of Sovereignty in the Political Architecture of Europe. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 16 (4):421-445.
    The debate on the nature of the European Union has become a test case of the kind of political and institutional arrangements appropriate in an age of globalization. This paper explores three views of the EU. The two main positions that have hitherto confronted each other appeal to either cosmopolitan or communitarian values. Advocates of the former argue for some form of federal structure in Europe and are convinced that the sovereignty of the nation state belongs to the past. Proponents (...)
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  14. Anna Bendz (2004). I Välfärdsstatens Hägn: Autonomi Inom Arbetslöshetsförsäkringen. Statsvetenskapliga Institutionen, Göteborgs Universitet.
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  15. Seyla Benhabib (2008). Democracy, Demography, and Sovereignty. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 2 (1):1-32.
  16. Geoffrey Bennington (2006). The Fall of Sovereignty. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):395-406.
    Reflecting on the fall or failure of sovereignty, this essay considers Derrida’s recent work under the heading of auto-immunity, and develops some consequences of that work, first of all in the political sphere (especially around democracy), but also some more general consequences around conceptuality itself.
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  17. Lorenzo Bernini (2010). La Sovranità Scomposta: Sull'attualità Del Leviatano. Mimesis.
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  18. J. M. Bernstein (2010). Without Sovereignty or Miracles: Reply to Birmingham. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (1):21-31.
    Let me begin with a wisp of political history. According to the Earl of Clarendon, in 1639 the king’s “three kingdoms [were] flourishing in entire peace and universal plenty.”1 Yet by 1642 civil war had broken out, and in 1649 the king was beheaded. What had caused this breakdown of civil and political order, a breakdown that was not localized in England but, in fact, rife throughout Europe—1648 like 1848 was a year of revolutions? Clarendon himself is less than acute (...)
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  19. M. Bettati (1996). The International Community and Limitations of Sovereignty. Diogenes 44 (176):91-109.
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  20. Newton Bignotto (2008). Sovereignty and Exception of Thought in Carl Schmitt. Kriterion 49 (118):401-416.
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  21. Newton Bignotto (2008). Soberania e exceção no pensamento de Carl Schmitt. Kriterion 49 (118):401-415.
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  22. Colin Bird (2007). Harm Versus Sovereignty: A Reply to Ripstein. Philosophy and Public Affairs 35 (2):179–194.
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  23. Michael Blake (2007). Review of Seyla Benhabib Et Al., Another Cosmopolitanism: Hospitality, Sovereignty, and Democratic Iterations. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (5).
  24. Alastair J. L. Blanshard (2005). Talking About Tyrants K. A. Morgan (Ed.): Popular Tyranny. Sovereignty and its Discontents in Ancient Greece . Pp. Xxvii + 324, Ills. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2003. Cased, US$50. ISBN: 0-292-75276-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):213-.
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  25. Baruch A. Brody (2010). Intellectual Property, State Sovereignty, and Biotechnology. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (1):pp. 51-73.
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  26. Wendy Brown (2008). Sovereignty and the Return of the Repressed. In David Campbell & Morton Schoolman (eds.), The New Pluralism: William Connolly and the Contemporary Global Condition. Duke University Press. 250--272.
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  27. Hauke Brunkhorst (2000). Rights and the Sovereignty of the People in the Crisis of the Nation State. Ratio Juris 13 (1):49-62.
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  28. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2007). Paths to Democracy of the Post-Soviet Republics: Attempt at Conceptualization. In Ewa Czerwińska-Schupp (ed.), Values and Norms in the Age of Globalization. Peter Lang. 1--30.
    The paper conceptualizes five basic developmental paths the post-Soviet republics followed. The conceptual framework of this paper is expanded theory of real socialism in non-Marxian historical materialism, namely proposed the model of secession from socialist empire. The first developmental path was followed by societies in which an independent civil revolution took place. This path of development bifurcates into two furhter sub-variants. Namely civil revolutions in the Baltic republics (Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia) resulted in the independence and stable democracies. Civil revolution in (...)
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  29. Peter Byrne (1998). F. K. Beiser. The Sovereignty of Reason: The Defence of Rationality in the Early English Enlightenment. (Princeton University Press. Princeton. 1996.) Pp. XI+332. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 34 (2):219-229.
  30. Matthew Calarco & Steven DeCaroli (eds.) (2007). Giorgio Agamben: Sovereignty and Life. Stanford University Press.
    Giorgio Agamben has come to be recognized in recent years as one of the most provocative and imaginative thinkers in contemporary philosophy and political theory. The essays gathered together in this volume shed light on his extensive body of writings and assess the significance of his work for debates across a wide range of fields, including philosophy, political theory, Jewish studies, and animal studies. The authors discuss material extending across the entire range of Agamben's writings, including such early works as (...)
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  31. Terrell Carver (2009). Sovereignties: Contemporary Theory and Practice. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (4):468.
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  32. Terrell Carver (2009). Sovereignty: History and Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (4):470.
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  33. Eric Cavallero (2003). Popular Sovereignty and the Law of Peoples. Legal Theory 9 (3):181-200.
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  34. Simone Chambers (2004). Democracy, Popular Sovereignty, and Constitutional Legitimacy. Constellations 11 (2):153-173.
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  35. David Chandler (2007). Potemkin Sovereignty: Statehood Without Politics in the New World Order. The Monist 90 (1):86-105.
  36. Noam Chomsky, Socioeconomic Sovereignty.
    p208 A century ago, during the early stages of the corporatization of the United States, discussion(about these matters)was quite frank. Conservatives a century ago denounced the procedure, describing corporatization as a "return to feudalism" and "a form of communism," which is not an entirely inappropriate analogy. There were similar intellectual origins in neo Hegelian ideas about the rights of organic entities, along with the belief in the need to have a centralized administration of chaotic systems like the markets, which were (...)
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  37. Jarat Chopra & Thomas G. Weiss (1992). Sovereignty is No Longer Sacrosanct: Codifying Humanitarian Intervention. Ethics and International Affairs 6 (1):95–117.
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  38. Tim Cloudsley (2011). Sovereignty and Revolution in the Iberian Atlantic. The European Legacy 16 (1):97-107.
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  39. Jean L. Cohen (2004). Whose Sovereignty? Empire Versus International Law. Ethics and International Affairs 18 (3):1–24.
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  40. Rory J. Conces (1998). Consensual Foundations and Resistance in Locke's `Second Treatise'. Theoria 45 (91):19-33.
  41. Rory J. Conces (1997). Contract, Trust, and Resistance in the 'Second Treatise'. The Locke Newsletter (28):117-33.
  42. Rory J. Conces (1996). Ethics and Sovereignty. International Third World Studies Journal and Review 8:1-11.
  43. Tyler Cowen (1993). The Scope and Limits of Preference Sovereignty. Economics and Philosophy 9 (02):253-.
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  44. Evan J. Criddle & Evan Fox-Decent, Deriving Peremptory Norms From Sovereignty.
    In international law, the term "jus cogens" refers to norms that are considered peremptory in the sense that they are mandatory and do not admit derogation. Although the jus cogens concept has achieved widespread acceptance, international legal theory has yet to furnish a satisfying account of jus cogens's legal basis. We argue that peremptory norms are inextricably linked to the sovereign powers assumed by all states. The key to understanding international jus cogens lies in Immanuel Kant's discussion of the (...)
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  45. Eleanor Curran (2006). Can Rights Curb the Hobbesian Sovereign? The Full Right to Self-Preservation, Duties of Sovereignty and the Limitations of Hohfeld. Law and Philosophy 25 (2):243-265.
  46. Omar Dahbour (2006). Advocating Sovereignty in an Age of Globalization. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (1):108-126.
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  47. Kathleen Davis (2010). The Sense of an Epoch : Periodization, Sovereignty, and the Limits of Secularization. In Andrew Cole & D. Vance Smith (eds.), The Legitimacy of the Middle Ages: On the Unwritten History of Theory. Duke University Press.
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  48. B. B. de La Perriere (1996). The Burmese Nats: Between Sovereignty and Autochthony. Diogenes 44 (174):45-60.
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  49. Peter de Marneffe (2004). Popular Sovereignty, Original Meaning, and Common Law Constitutionalism. Law and Philosophy 23 (3):223-260.
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  50. Peter De Marneffe (1994). Popular Sovereignty and Thegriswold Problematic. Law and Philosophy 13 (1):97-112.
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