92 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Paul Redding (University of Sydney)
  1.  19
    Paul Redding (2009). Continental Idealism: Leibniz to Nietzsche. Routledge.
    The seventeenth century background to the emergence of continental idealism -- Monadological world of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz -- Kant's development from physical to moral monadologist -- Kant and the "Copernican" conception of transcendental philosophy -- The moral framework of metaphysics -- The later Kant as a "post-Kantian" philosopher? -- Jena post-Kantianism: Reinhold and Fichte -- The romanticisms of Friedrich Schlegel and Friedrich Schelling -- Hegel's idealist metaphysics of spirit -- Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and the ambiguous end of the idealist tradition -- (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  2. Paul Redding (2013). Hegel, Aristotle and the Conception of Free Agency. In Gunnar Hindrichs Axel Honneth (ed.), Freiheit: Stuttgarter Hegelkrongress 2011. Vittorio Klostermann
  3.  59
    Paul Redding (2007). Analytic Philosophy and the Return of Hegelian Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    Examines the possibilities for the rehabilitation of Hegelian thought within current analytic philosophy. From its inception, the analytic tradition has in general accepted Bertrand Russell's hostile dismissal of the idealists, based on the claim that their metaphysical views were irretrievably corrupted by the faulty logic that informed them. But these assumptions are challenged by the work of such analytic philosophers as John McDowell and Robert Brandom, who while contributing to core areas of the analytic movement, nevertheless have found in Hegel (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  4.  41
    Paul Redding & Paolo Diego Bubbio (2014). Hegel and the Ontological Argument for the Existence of God. Religious Studies 50 (04):485-486.
    We reconstruct Hegel’s implicit version of the ontological argument in the light of his anti-representationalist idealist metaphysics. For Hegel, the ontological argument had been a peculiarly modern form of argument for the existence of God, presupposing a ‘representationalist’ account of the mind and its concepts. As such, it was susceptible to Kant’s famous refutation, but Kant himself had provided a model for an alternative conception of concept, one developed by Fichte with his notion of the I=I. We (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5. Paul Redding (2014). Pragmatism, Idealism and the Modal Menace: Rorty, Brandom and Truths About Photons. The European Legacy 19 (2):174-186.
    In a short exchange published in 2000, Richard Rorty and Robert Brandom differed over the status of “facts” in a world containing no speakers and, hence, no speech acts. While Brandom wanted to retain the meaningfulness of talk of “facts” or “truths” about things—in this case truths about photons —in a world in which there could be no claimings about such things, Rorty denied the existence of any such “worldly items” as “facts.” In this essay the difference between (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6. Paul Redding (2012). Thom Brook's Project of a Systematic Reading of Hegel's Philosophy of Right. Hegel Bulletin 33 (2):1–9.
  7.  17
    Paul Redding (1996). Hegel's Hermeneutics. Cornell University Press.
    An advance on recent revisionist thinking about Hegelian philosophy, this book interprets Hegel's achievement as part of a revolutionary modernization of ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  8. Paul Redding (2013). The Necessity of History for Philosophy – Even Analytic Philosophy. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):299-325.
    Analytic philosophers are often said to be indifferent or even hostile to the history of philosophy – that is, not to the idea of history of philosophy as such, but regarded as a species of the genus philosophy rather than the genus history. Here it is argued that such an attitude is actually inconsistent with approaches within the philosophies of mind that are typical within analytic philosophy. It is suggested that the common “argument rather than pedigree” claim (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  16
    Paul Redding (forthcoming). From Empiricism to Expressivism: Brandom Reads Sellars, by Robert B. Brandom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Paul Redding (1986). Habermas, Lyotard, Wittgenstein: Philosophy at the Limits of Modernity. Thesis Eleven 14 (1):9-25.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  33
    Paul Redding (2014). The Role of Logic "Commonly So Called" in Hegel's Science of Logic. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):281-301.
    This paper examines Hegel’s accounts of the nature of judgements and inferences in the ‘subjective logic’ of the Science of Logic, and does so in light of the history of the tradition of formal logic to his time. It is argued that, contrary to the attitude often displayed by interpreters of Hegel’s logic, it is important to understand the positive role played by formal logic, ‘logic commonly so called’, in Hegel’s own conception of logic. It is argued that Hegel’s own (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  44
    Paul Redding (2014). An Hegelian Solution to a Tangle of Problems Facing Brandom's Analytic Pragmatism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy (4):DOI:10.1080/09608788.2014.984284.
    In his program of analytic pragmatism, Robert Brandom has presented a thoroughgoing reinterpretation of the place of analytic philosophy in the history of philosophy by linking his own non-representational “inferentialist” approach to semantics to the rationalist–idealist tradition, and in particular, to Hegel. Brandom, however, has not been without his critics in regard to both his approach to semantics and his interpretation of Hegel. -/- Here I single out four interlinked problematic areas facing Brandom’s inferentialist semantics—his approach of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Paul Redding (2014). Hegel and Pragmatism. In Michael Baur (ed.), Hegel: Key Concepts. Routledge
  14.  6
    Paul Redding (2007). Hegel, IdealIsm and God: PHIlosoPHy as tHe Self-CorreCtIng aPProPrIatIon of tHe Norms of lIfe and tHougHt. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 3 (2-3):16-31.
    Can Hegel, a philosopher who claims that philosophy lsquo;has no other object but God and so is essentially rational theologyrsquo;, ever be taken as anything emother than/em a religious philosopher with little to say to any philosophical project that identifies itself as emsecular/em?nbsp; If the valuable substantive insights found in the detail of Hegelrsquo;s philosophy are to be rescued for a secular philosophy, then, it is commonly presupposed, some type of global reinterpretation of the enframing idealistic framework is required. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  15. Paul Redding (2012). Some Metaphysical Implications of Hegel's Theology. European Journal for the Philosophy of Religion 4 (1):139–150.
    Hegel makes claims about the relation of philosophy to religion that might raise concerns for those who want to locate his philosophy generally within the modern enlightenment tradition. For example, at the outset of his Lectures on Aesthetics he claims that philosophy “has no other object but God and so is essentially rational theology”.1 What might seem to placate worries here is that Hegel of course differentiates between the forms of religious and philosophical cognition in which such a content is (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16.  9
    Paul Redding (1999). The Logic of Affect. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction: A Logic for the Reasons of the Heart? Creating an aphorism that would prove irresistible to many later investigators into affective life, ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  17. Paul Redding (2001). Embodiment, Conceptuality and Intersubjectivity in Idealist and Pragmatist Approaches to Judgment. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (4):257-271.
  18.  64
    Paul Redding (2007). Hegel, Fichte and the Pragmatic Contexts of Moral Judgment. In Espen Hammer (ed.), German Idealism: Contemporary Perspectives. Routledge
    Hegel’s treatment of ‘Moralität’ in both the Phenomenology of Spirit and the Philosophy of Right provides important clues as to how he conceives the recognitive dynamics of modern moral life. As ‘spirit that is certain of itself’, morality as comprehended in the Phenomenology is the final form of spirit [Geist], which, in Hegel’s exposition, follows ‘reason’ which itself had followed ‘consciousness’ and ‘self-consciousness’. Spirit had first been considered in its objective form as an ‘in itself’. This was the ‘true spirit’ (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  70
    Paul Redding (2012). Wilfrid Sellars's Disambiguation of Kant's "Intuition" and its Relevance for the Analysis of Perceptual Content. Paradigmi. Rivista di Critica Filosofica 30 (1):127–140.
  20. Paul Redding (2013). Hegel and Analytic Philosophy. In Allegra de Lauentiis Jeffrey Edwards (ed.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Hegel. Bloomsbury
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  51
    Paul Redding (2012). McDowell's Radicalization of Kant's Account of Concepts and Intuitions: A Sellarsian (and Hegelian) Critique. Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 41 (1–3):9–37.
    McDowell’s attempts to find a way out of the grip of some seemingly intractable problems besetting analytic philosophy has led him back to Kant and Hegel. Understanding, with Kant, the role played by concepts in experience will point the way forward, but Kant’s thinking must be released from its own problems which threaten to reduce the contents of experience and knowledge to “facts about us”. Kant’s “subjectivism” must be subjected to an “Hegelian” critique. However, McDowell’s solution to that problem, which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  53
    Paul Redding (2011). The Relevance of Hegel’s “Absolute Spirit” to Social Normativity. In Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.), Recognition and Social Ontology. Brill 212--238.
    Around the turn of the twentieth century, Wilhelm Dilthey, in his reflections on the nature of history as a “Geisteswissenschaft”—a science of “spirit” as opposed to “nature”—appealed “to Hegel’s notion of “spirit” (Geist). Attempting to extract Hegel’s concept from what he considered the unsupportable metaphysical system within which it had been developed, Dilthey, a neo-Kantian, gave it a broadly epistemological significance by correlating it with a distinct type of “understanding” (Verstehen) that was foreign to the Naturwissenschaften, concerned as they were (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  28
    Paul Redding (2003). What Is an Epistemic Perspective? Journal of Philosophical Research 28:371-390.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  11
    Paul Redding (2014). An Hegelian Solution to a Tangle of Problems Facing Brandom'S Analytic Pragmatism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (4):657-680.
    In his program of analytic pragmatism, Robert Brandom has presented a thoroughgoing reinterpretation of the place of analytic philosophy in the history of philosophy by linking his own non-representational ‘inferentialist’ approach to semantics to the rationalist – idealist tradition, and in particular, to Hegel. Brandom, however, has not been without his critics in regard to both his approach to semantics and his interpretation of Hegel. Here I single out four interlinked problematic areas facing Brandom's inferentialist semantics – his approach of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  34
    Paul Redding (2003). Hegel and Peircean Abduction. European Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):295–313.
  26. Paul Redding (2010). The Possibility of German Idealism After Analytic Philosophy : McDowell, Brandom and Beyond. In James Williams (ed.), Postanalytic and Metacontinental: Crossing Philosophical Divides. Continuum
    The late Richard Rorty was no stranger to provocation, and many an analytic philosopher would surely count as extremely provocative comments he had made on Robert Brandom’s highly regarded book from 1994, Making It Explicit.1 Brandom’s book was, Rorty asserted “an attempt to usher analytic philosophy from its Kantian to its Hegelian stage.”2 The reception of Kant within analytic philosophy has surely been, at best, patchy, but if it is difficult to imagine exactly what Rorty could have had in mind (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Paul Redding, McDowell and the Propositionality of Perceptual Content Thesis.
    In Mind and World and subsequent writings up to an essay first published in 2008 entitled “Avoiding the Myth of the Given”,1 John McDowell had insisted not only on the conceptuality of what is often discussed as “perceptual content” but also on the propositionality of that content. Many might find this puzzling. At the most intuitive level, one might think of the “content” of perception, what one perceives, as things— things with particular properties, and things arranged in particular relations. I (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Paul Redding, Fichte's Role in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit, Chapter 4.
    Prior to Kojève's well-known account in his Introduction to the Reading of Hegel there seems to have been relatively little interest in Hegel's concept of recognition— Anerkennung.1 After Kojève, however, a popular view of Hegel's philosophy emerged within which the idea of recognition plays a central role: what distinguishes us as selfconscious beings from the rest of nature is that we are driven by a peculiar type of desire, the desire for recognition leading to struggle's over recognition. While Kojève directed (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  57
    Paul Redding (2010-11). Hegel's Anticipation of the Early History of Analytic Philosophy. The Owl of Minerva 42 (1–2):18–40.
    Putting it very crudely, it might be said that in the much discussed opening three chapters that make up the section “Consciousness” of his Phenomenology of Spirit Hegel sketches and “test-drives” various models for a consciousness able to experience and know the world.1 Kant had thought of objects of experience as necessarily having conceptual (as well as spatio-temporal) form, but non-conceptual (“intuitional”) content. But for Hegel, that objects show themselves to have a conceptual form emerges as one the first lessons (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Paul Redding (2007). Idealism: A Love (of Sophia) That Dare Not Speak its Name. Arts 29:71–94.
    My first experience of philosophy at the University of Sydney was as a commencing undergraduate in the tumultuous year of 1973. At the start of that year, there was one department of philosophy, but by the beginning of the next there were two. These two departments seemed to be opposed in every possible way except one: they both professed to be committed to a form of materialist philosophy. One could think that having a common enemy at least might have been (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  78
    Paul Redding (2010). Two Directions for Analytic Kantianism : Naturalism and Idealism. In Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Columbia University Press
    Usually, analytic philosophy is thought of as standing firmly within the tradition of empiricism, but recently attention has been drawn to the strongly Kantian features that have characterized this philosophical movement throughout a considerable part of its history. Those charting the history of early analytic philosophy sometimes point to a more Kantian stream of thought feeding it from both Frege and Wittgenstein, and as countering a quite different stream flowing from the early Russell and Moore. In line with this general (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  14
    Paul Redding, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  20
    Paul Redding (2011). German Idealism. In George Klosko (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press 348.
  34. Paul Redding (2011). The Analytic Neo-Hegelianism of John McDowell & Robert Brandom. In Stephen Houlgate & Michael Baur (eds.), A Companion to Hegel. Blackwell
    The historical origins of the analytic style that was to become dominant within academic philosophy in the English-speaking world are often traced to the work of Bertrand Russell and G. E. Moore at the turn of the twentieth century, and portrayed as involving a radical break with the idealist philosophy that had bloomed in Britain at the end of the nineteenth. Congruent with this view, Hegel is typically taken as representing a type of philosophy that analytic philosophy assiduously avoids. Thus, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  41
    Paul Redding (2011). Leibniz and Newton on Space, Time and the Trinity. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 7 (16):26-41.
    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, who was born in 1646 just before the end of the Thirty Years War and who died 1716, is surely one of the most bizarre and interesting of the early modern philosophers. He was an astonishing polymath, and responsible for some of the most advanced work in the sciences of his day—he was, for instance, the co-inventor along with Newton, of differential calculus, and is generally recognized as the greatest logician of the early modern period, responsible for (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  62
    Paul Redding (2005). Pierre Bourdieu: From Neo-Kantian to Hegelian Critical Social Theory. Critical Horizons 6 (1):183-204.
    This paper challenges the commonly made claim that the work of Pierre Bourdieu is fundamentally anti-Hegelian in orientation. In contrast, it argues that the development of Bourdieu's work from its earliest structuralist through its later 'post-structuralist' phase is better described in terms of a shift from a late nineteenth century neo-Kantian to a distinctly Hegelian post-Kantian outlook. In his break with structuralism, Bourdieu appealed to a bodily based 'logic of practice' to explain the binaristic logic of Lévi-Strauss' structuralist analyses of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Paul Redding (2008). The Independence and Dependence of Self-Consciousness: The Dialectic of Lord and Bondsman in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. In Frederick Beiser (ed.), The New Cambridge Companion to Hegel and Nineteenth Century Philosophy. Cambridge University Press
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38. Paul Redding (2012). The Relation of Logic to Ontology in Hegel. In Lila Haaparanta & Heikki Koskinen (eds.), Categories of Being: Essays on Metaphysics and Logic. Oxford University Press
    Even among those philosophers who hold particular aspects of Hegel's philosophy in high regard, there have been few since the 19th century who have found Hegel's "metaphysics" plausible, and just as few not sceptical about the coherency of the "logical" project on which it is meant to be based. Indeed, against the type of work characteristic of the late nineteenth-century logical revolution which issued in modern analytic philosophy, it is often difficult to see exactly how Hegel's "logical" writings can be (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  38
    Paul Redding (2011). Review of The Philosophy of Richard Rorty. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:2011.03.20.
  40.  54
    Paul Redding (2002). Terry Pinkard, Hegel: A Biography. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (442):470-473.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  46
    Paul Redding (2005). Michael Quante: Hegel's Concept of Action. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews,.
    In the "Preface" to this English translation of a book first published in German a decade ago, the author notes a change in recent philosophical culture bearing on the project he had undertaken in it. When he had first started working on the book there had been little if any interest in Hegel among analytic philosophers (including German speaking ones), while orthodox Hegel scholars had generally thought that there was little to be gained by utilizing analytic approaches in their attempt (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Paul Redding, Replies to Bob Brandom and Jim Kreines.
    (Author’s reply at “Author-Meets-Critics” session (on Paul Redding, Analytic Philosophy and the Return of Hegelian Thought) at the Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Pacific Division, Vancouver, April 10, 2009. Robert Brandom’s “critic’s” contribution is available as “Hegel and Analytic Philosophy” from his website http://www.pitt.edu/~brandom/.).
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  17
    Paul Redding (2013). Tragedy, Recognition and the Death of God. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201307.
  44.  34
    Paul Redding (1987). Anthropology as Ritual: Wittgenstein's Reading of Frazer's the Golden Bough. Metaphilosophy 18 (3-4):253-269.
  45.  11
    Paul Redding (1990). Philosophy and Non-Philosophy Since Merleau-Ponty (Review). Philosophy and Literature 14 (1):190-191.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  14
    Paul Redding (1994). Philosophical Republicanism and Monarchism—and Republican and Monarchical Philosophy—in Kant and Hegel. The Owl of Minerva 26 (1):35-46.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  7
    Paul Redding (2011). Having the World in View: Essays on Kant, Hegel, and Sellars. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 120 (1):137-140.
  48.  9
    Russell Brown, Dominic Murphy, Stephen Stich, Donald Dryden, Paul Redding & Neil McNaughton (1999). Eliminating Emotions? Metascience 8 (1):5-49.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  14
    Paul Redding (1991). Hegel's Logic of Being and the Polarities of Presocratic Thought. The Monist 74 (3):438-456.
  50.  19
    Paul Redding (2011). Empiricism, Perceptual Knowledge, Normativity, and Realism: Essays on Wilfrid Sellars, Edited by Willem A. deVries . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009, 302 Pp. ISBN 978-0-19-957330-1 Hb $65. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 19 (4):633-639.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 92