Results for 'Allen S. Lee'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  6
    Managing the Health Effects of Climate.A. Costello, M. Abbas, A. Allen, S. Ball, S. Bell, R. Bellamy, S. Friel, N. Groce, A. Johnson, M. Kett, M. Lee, C. Levy, M. Maslin, D. McCoy, B. McGuire, H. Montgomery, D. Napier, C. Pagel, J. Patel, J. Oliveira, N. Redclift, H. Rees, D. Rogger, J. Scott, J. Stephenson, J. Twigg, J. Wolff & C. Patterson - unknown
  2.  3
    Moral Distress Among Healthcare Professionals at a Health System.Rose Allen, Tanya Judkins-Cohn, Raul deVelasco, Edwina Forges, Rosemary Lee, Laurel Clark & Maggie Procunier - 2013 - Jona’s Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 15 (3):111-118.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3. Woody Allen's Angst Philosophical Commentaries on His Serious Films.Sander H. Lee - 1997
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  1
    Can Theoretical Underdetermination Support the Indeterminacy of Translation? Revisiting Quine's ‘Real Ground’: Sophie R. Allen.Sophie R. Allen - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (1):67-90.
    It is commonly believed that Quine's principal argument for the Indeterminacy of Translation requires an untenably strong account of the underdetermination of theories by evidence, namely that that two theories may be compatible with all possible evidence for them and yet incompatible with each other. In this article, I argue that Quine's conclusion that translation is indeterminate can be based upon the weaker, uncontroversial conception of theoretical underdetermination, in conjunction with a weak reading of the ‘Gavagai’ argument which establishes the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  47
    Lee's Rejoinder to Mercier's Reply.Patrick Lee - 2008 - The Monist 91 (3/4):442-445.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  2
    What's the Point in Scientific Realism If We Don't Know What's Really There?: Sophie R. Allen.Sophie R. Allen - 2007 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (61):97-123.
    The aim of this paper will be to show that certain strongly realist forms of scientific realism are either misguided or misnamed. I will argue that, in the case of a range of robustly realist formulations of scientific realism, the ‘scientific’ and the ‘realism’ are in significant philosophical and methodological conflict with each other; in particular, that there is a tension between the actual subject matter and methods of science on the one hand, and the realists' metaphysical claims about which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  12
    Ling and Lee's Open Letter.Laura Ling & Euna Lee - 2010 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (1):72-76.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. The Praise of Folly, Tr. By J. Wilson, Ed. By Mrs.P. S. Allen.Desiderius Erasmus, Helen Mary Allen & John Wilson - 1913
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Lee, A. G., Ed., P. Ovidi Nasonis Metamorphoseon Liber I.A. S. Allen - 1953 - Classical Weekly 47:10.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Icastes: Marsilio Ficino's Interpretation of Plato's Sophist, Five Studies, with a Critical Edition and Translation.Michael J. B. Allen - 1989 - University of California Press.
    Michael Allen's latest work on the profoundly influential Florentine thinker of the fifteenth century, Marsilio Ficino, will be welcomed by philosophers, literary scholars, and historians of the Renaissance, as well as by classicists. Ficino was responsible for inaugurating, shaping, and disseminating the wide-ranging philosophico-cultural movement known as Renaissance Platonism, and his views on the _Sophist_, which he saw as Plato's preeminent ontological dialogue, are of signal interest. This dialogue also served Ficino as a vehicle for exploring a number of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Plato's Euthyphro and the Earlier Theory of Forms : A Re-Interpretation of the Republic.R. E. Allen - 2012 - Routledge.
    Plato’s Euthyphro is important because it gives an excellent example of Socratic dialogue in operation and of the connection of that dialectic with Plato’s earlier theory of Forms. Professor Allen’s edition of the dialogue provides a translation with interspersed commentary, aimed both at helping the reader who does not have Greek and also elucidating the discussion of the earlier Theory of Forms which follows. The author argues that there is a theory of Forms in the Euthyphro and in other (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Plato's Euthyphro and the Earlier Theory of Forms (Rle: Plato): A Re-Interpretation of the Republic.R. E. Allen - 2012 - Routledge.
    Plato’s Euthyphro is important because it gives an excellent example of Socratic dialogue in operation and of the connection of that dialectic with Plato’s earlier theory of Forms. Professor Allen’s edition of the dialogue provides a translation with interspersed commentary, aimed both at helping the reader who does not have Greek and also elucidating the discussion of the earlier Theory of Forms which follows. The author argues that there is a theory of Forms in the Euthyphro and in other (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  43
    Postcolonial Ambivalence and Phenomenological Ambiguity: Toward Recognizing Asian American Women's Agency.Emily S. Lee - 2016 - Critical Philosophy of Race 4 (1):56-73.
    Homi Bhabha brings attention to the figure of the post-colonial metropolitan subject—a third world subject who resides in the first world. Bhabha describes the experiences of the “colonial” subject as ambivalently split. As much as I find his work insightful, I find problematic Bhabha’s descriptions of the daily life of post-colonial metropolitan subjects as split and doubled. His analysis lends only to the possibility of these splittings/doublings as schizophrenically wholly arising. His analysis cannot account for the agonistic moments when the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Madness and Judiciousness: A Phenomenological Reading of a Black Woman’s Encounter with a Saleschild.Emily S. Lee - 2010 - In Maria Del Guadalupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines & Donna-Dale L. Marcano (eds.), Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    Patricia Williams in her book, The Alchemy of Race and Rights, describes being denied entrance in the middle of the afternoon by a “saleschild.” Utilizing the works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, this article explores their interaction phenomenologically. This small interaction of seemingly simple misunderstanding represents a limit condition in Merleau-Ponty’s analysis. His phenomenological framework does not explain the chasm between the “saleschild” and Williams, that in a sense they do not participate in the same world. This interaction between the “saleschild” and (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  33
    A Phenomenology for Homi Bhabha's Postcolonial Metropolitan Subject.Emily S. Lee - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (4):537-557.
    Homi Bhabha attends to the figure of the postcolonial metropolitan subject-a racialized subject who is not representative of the first world, yet a symbol of the metropolitan sphere. Bhabha describes theirdaily lives as inextricably split or doubled. His analysis cannot account for the agonistic moments when one is caught in not knowing, in focusing attention, and in developing understanding. Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology with the openness in the horizon of the gestaltian framework better accounts for such splits as moments on the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  1
    A Phenomenology for Homi Bhabha’s Postcolonial Metropolitan Subject.Emily S. Lee - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (4):537-557.
    Homi Bhabha attends to the figure of the postcolonial metropolitan subject-a racialized subject who is not representative of the first world, yet a symbol of the metropolitan sphere. Bhabha describes theirdaily lives as inextricably split or doubled. His analysis cannot account for the agonistic moments when one is caught in not knowing, in focusing attention, and in developing understanding. Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology with the openness in the horizon of the gestaltian framework better accounts for such splits as moments on the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Book Review of Dorothea Olkowski and Gail Weiss’s Feminist Interpretations of Maurice Merleau-Ponty. [REVIEW]Emily S. Lee - 2008 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 7 (2):24--26.
  18.  23
    Navigation as a Source of Geometric Knowledge: Young Children's Use of Length, Angle, Distance, and Direction in a Reorientation Task.Sang Ah Lee, Valeria A. Sovrano & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2012 - Cognition 123 (1):144-161.
  19.  23
    Infinity and Newton's Three Laws of Motion.Chunghyoung Lee - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (12):1810-1828.
    It is shown that the following three common understandings of Newton’s laws of motion do not hold for systems of infinitely many components. First, Newton’s third law, or the law of action and reaction, is universally believed to imply that the total sum of internal forces in a system is always zero. Several examples are presented to show that this belief fails to hold for infinite systems. Second, two of these examples are of an infinitely divisible continuous body with finite (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  2
    Plato's Meno.R. E. Allen & R. S. Bluck - 1963 - Philosophical Review 72 (4):530.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  5
    Realities. Oxford: Blackwell Science. 224 Pp.£ 17.99 (PB). ISBN 0 632 05157 4. Brett H 2002: Complementary Therapies in the Care of Older People. London: Whurr. 278 Pp.£ 19.50 (PB). ISBN 1 86156 304 3. Burns S, Bulman C Eds 2000: Reflective Practice in Nursing: The Growth of the Profes-Sional Practitioner, Oxford: Blackwell Science. 214 Pp.£ 15.99 (PB). [REVIEW]A. Fisher, L. Gormally, C. G. Helman, E. Lee, S. R. Lord, C. Sherrington, H. B. Menz, S. Loue, A. Morton-Cooper & A. Palmer - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (6).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  4
    Relevance, Conduction and Canada's Rape-Shield Decision.Derek Allen - 1993 - Informal Logic 15 (2).
    I examine a Canadian Supreme Court decision concerning the constitutionality of Canada's 1982 rape-shield legislation, and suggest how material from the decision might profitably be used in an informal-logic class in connection with the topics of relevance and conductive argument. I also consider theoretical matters related to the decision: first I develop two analyses of what I call an argument from 'unchasteness' and connect them to George Bowles's theory of propositional relevance; then I present Trudy Govier with a problem in (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  9
    Adequacy in World Hypotheses: Reconstructing Pepper's Criteria.Donald S. Lee - 1983 - Metaphilosophy 14 (2):151–161.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  1
    Ludwig Wittgenstein and the Vienna Circle: Conversations Recorded by Friedrich Waismann.Wittgenstein's Lectures: Cambridge 1930-1932, From the Notes of John King Desmond LeeWittgenstein's Lectures: Cambridge 1932-1935, From the Notes of Alice Ambrose and Margaret Macdonald. [REVIEW]P. M. S. Hacker, Brian McGuinness, Joachim Schulte, Desmond Lee & Alice Ambrose - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (3):444.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  2
    Broz, S.(2004) Good People in an Evil Time: Portraits of Complicity and Resistance in the Bosnian War (New York: Other Press). Dorling, D.(2005) Human Geography of the UK (London: Sage Publications). Hall, CM & Page, SJ (2002) The Geography of Tourism and Recreation: Environment, Place and Space (2nd Edn.)(New York: Routledge). [REVIEW]P. Hubbard, R. Kitchin, G. Valentine, A. Leyshon, R. Lee, C. C. Williams, D. S. Madison, T. Mizuuchi, M. K. Nelson & K. R. Olwig - 2005 - Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (3):393.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  1
    The Absolute Milieu: Blanchot’s Aesthetics of Melancholy.William S. Allen - 2015 - Research in Phenomenology 45 (1):53-86.
  27. Obedience, Struggle, and Revolt: The Historical Vision of Balzac's Father Goriot.James S. Allen - 1987 - Clio 16 (2):103-119.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Automorphisms of Η -Like Computable Linear Orderings and Kierstead's Conjecture.Charles M. Harris, Kyung Il Lee & S. Barry Cooper - 2016 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 62 (6):481-506.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Janet Kourany’s The Gender of Science.E. S. Lee - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (2):193--195.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  11
    Body Movement & Ethical Responsibility for a Situation.Emily S. Lee - 2014 - In Living Alterities: Phenomenology Embodiment and Race. SUNY Press. pp. 233-254.
    Exploring the intimate tie between body movement and space and time, Lee begins with the position that body movement generates space and time and explores the ethical implications of this responsibility for the situations one’s body movements generate. Whiteness theory has come to recognize the ethical responsibility for situations not of one’s own making and hence accountability for the results of more than one’s immediate personal conscious decisions. Because of our specific history, whites have developed a particular embodiment and body (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  40
    Gruesome Arithmetic: Kripke's Sceptic Replies.Barry G. Allen - 1989 - Dialogue 28 (2):257-264.
  32. Readings in Humanist Sociology: Social Criticism and Social Change.Walda Katz Fishman, George C. Benello, C. George Benello, Joseph Fashing, David G. Gil, Ted Goertzel, James Kelly, Alfred McClung Lee, Robert Newby, David J. O'Brien, Victoria Rader, Sal Restivo, Jerold M. Starr, Richard S. Sterne & Michael Zenzen - 1986 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Humanist sociologists are activists rooted in the reality of history and change and guided by a concern for the 'real life' problems of equality, peace, and social justice. They view people as active shapers of social life, capable of creating societies in which everyone's potential can unfold. Alfred McClung Lee introduces this volume with 'Sociology: Humanist and Scientific' and develops the theme that a sociology that is humanist is also scientific. The other nine selections are grouped into four parts: 'The (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  44
    Institutional Morality and the Principle of National Self-Determination.Hsin-wen Lee - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (1):207-226.
    Allen Buchanan proposes a methodological framework with which theorists may evaluate different theories of secession, including the National Self-Determination theory. An important claim he makes is, because the right to secede is inherently institutional, any adequate theory of secession must include, as an integral part, an analysis of institutional morality. Because the National Self-Determination theory blatantly lacks such an analysis, Buchanan concludes that this theory is inherently flawed. In this paper, I consider Buchanan’s framework and the responses from supporters (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  21
    The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature, Scientific Objectivity, and the Standpoint of the Subjugated: Anthropocentrism Reimagined.Wendy Lynne Lee - 2005 - Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (2):235-250.
    In the following essay, I argue for an alternative anthropocentrism that, eschewing failed appeals to traditional moral principle, takes (a) as its point of departure the cognitive, perceptual, emotive, somatic, and epistemic conditions of our existence as members of Homo sapiens, and (b) one feature of our experience of/under these conditions particularly seriously as an avenue toward articulating this alternative, the capacity for aesthetic appreciation. To this end, I will explore, but ultimately reject philosopher Allen Carlson's ecological aesthetics, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  20
    Sander H. Lee: Woody Allen's Angst: Philosophical Commentaries on His Serious Films. [REVIEW]Frederick Rauscher - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (4):571-574.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  42
    Values and the Perceived Importance of Ethics and Social Responsibility: The U.S. Versus China.William E. Shafer, Kyoko Fukukawa & Grace Meina Lee - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):265-284.
    This study examines the effects of nationality (U.S. vs. China) and personal values on managers’ responses to the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility (PRESOR) scale. Evidence that China’s transition to a socialist market economy has led to widespread business corruption, led us to hypothesize that People’s Republic of China (PRC) managers would believe less strongly in the importance of ethical and socially responsible business conduct. We also hypothesized that after controlling for national differences, managers’ personal values (more specifically, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  37. A Skeptic's Progress.Colin Allen - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):695-702.
    Seven chimpanzees in twenty-seven experiments run over the course of five years at his University of Louisiana laboratory in New Iberia, Louisiana, are at the heart of Daniel Povinelli’s case that chimpanzee thinking about the physical world is not at all like that of humans. Chimps, according to Povinelli and his coauthors James Reaux, Laura Theall, and Steve Giambrone, are phenomenally quick at learning to associate visible features of tools with specific uses of those tools, but they appear to lack (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  38.  24
    Theatrical Latency: Walking Katrina Palmer’s The Loss Adjusters.Richard Allen - unknown
    In this article I introduce the term ‘theatrical latency’ as a pleasurable effect experienced when listening to sound in relation to visual perception. Latency refers to both the phenomena of audio delay and a theatrical sensation that comes from the reanimation of visual environments through aural framing. In this configuration, the notion of latency takes on a double meaning as both a recorded phenomenon and the retrieval of something dormant within physical objects, sites or materials. These ideas will be introduced (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Free Will and Indeterminism: Robert Kane's Libertarianism.Robert F. Allen - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Research 30:341-355.
    Drawing on Aristotle’s notion of “ultimate responsibility,” Robert Kane argues that to be exercising a free will an agent must have taken some character forming decisions for which there were no sufficient conditions or decisive reasons.1 That is, an agent whose will is free not only had the ability to develop other dispositions, but could have exercised that ability without being irrational. To say it again, a person has a free will just in case her character is the product of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  40.  55
    Post-Approval Monitoring and Oversight of U.S.-Initiated Human Subjects Research in Resource-Constrained Countries.Brandon Brown, Janni Kinsler, Morenike O. Folayan, Karen Allen & Carlos F. Cáceres - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):119-123.
    The history of human subjects research and controversial procedures in relation to it has helped form the field of bioethics. Ethically questionable elements may be identified during research design, research implementation, management at the study site, or actions by a study’s investigator or other staff. Post-approval monitoring (PAM) may prevent violations from occurring or enable their identification at an early stage. In U.S.-initiated human subjects research taking place in resource-constrained countries with limited development of research regulatory structures, arranging a site (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  40
    Benchmarking and Transparency: Incentives for the Pharmaceutical Industry's Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Matthew Lee & Jillian Kohler - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):641-658.
    With over 2 billion people lacking medicines for treatable diseases and 14 million people dying annually from infectious disease, there is undeniable need for increased access to medicines. There has been an increasing trend to benchmark the pharmaceutical industry on their corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance in access to medicines. Benchmarking creates a competitive inter-business environment and acts as incentive for improving CSR. This article investigates the corporate feedback discourses pharmaceutical companies make in response to criticisms from benchmarking reports. It (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  48
    What is It Like to Be a Butterfly? A Philosophical Interpretation of Zhuangzi's Butterfly Dream.Jung H. Lee - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (2):185 – 202.
    This paper attempts to recast Zhuangzi's Butterfly Dream within the larger normative context of the 'Inner Chapters' and early Daoism in terms of its moral significance, particularly in the way that it prescribes how a Daoist should live through the 'significant symbol' of the butterfly. This normative reading of the passage will be contrasted with two recent interpretations of the passage - one by Robert Allinson and the other by Harold Roth - that tend to focus more on the epistemological (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  43.  61
    Does Plantinga's Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism Work?Wang-yen Lee - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (1):73.
    In Alvin Plantinga's evolutionary argument against naturalism (EAAN), he contends that someone who holds both naturalism (N) and evolution (E) acquires an undefeated defeater for her belief that 'human cognitive faculties are reliable' (R) and as a result an undefeated defeater for everything else she believes when she comes to realize that P(R/N&E) is low or inscrutable. I argue for two theses in this paper. First, when a naturalist-evolutionist comes to think that P(R/N&E) is inscrutable, that does not constitute an (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Dependency, Subordination, and Recognition: On Judith Butler's Theory of Subjection. [REVIEW]Amy Allen - 2005 - Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):199-222.
    Judith Butler's recent work expands the Foucaultian notion of subjection to encompass an analysis of the ways in which subordinated individuals becomes passionately attached to, and thus come to be psychically invested in, their own subordination. I argue that Butler's psychoanalytically grounded account of subjection offers a compelling diagnosis of how and why an attachment to oppressive norms – of femininity, for example – can persist in the face of rational critique of those norms. However, I also argue that her (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45. Problems of Religious Pluralism: A Zen Critique of John Hick's Ontological Monomorphism.Jung H. Lee - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (3):453-477.
    John Hick's "pluralistic hypothesis" of religion essays a comprehensive vision of religious diversity and its attendant soteriological, epistemological, and ontological implications. At the heart of Hick's proposal is the belief in the transcendental unity and soteriological identity of all religions. While coherent and compelling, Hick's model militates against those traditions that do not possess an ultimate noumenal referent that undergirds the phenomenal responses of culturally conditioned traditions. One of those traditions, namely Sōtō Zen Buddhism, at once defies Hick's categories and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  17
    Fales's Defense of the Given and Requirements for Being a Reason.Byeong D. Lee - 2013 - Philosophia 41 (4):1217-1235.
    Fales defends the doctrine of the given against the Sellarsian dilemma. On his view, sensory experiences, to which one has direct access, can justify basic beliefs. He upholds this view by way of defending an expansive conception of inference, according to which a broadly inferential relation can hold between sensory experiences and perceptual beliefs. The purpose of this paper is to show that Fales’s defense of the given fails. For this purpose, I argue that there are two requirements for being (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  90
    Mircea Eliade's Challenge to Contemporary Philosophy.Douglas Allen - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:33-40.
    Mircea Eliade, often described by scholars and in the popular press as the world's most influential scholar of religion, symbolism, and myth, was trained as a philosopher, received his Ph.D. in philosophy, and taught in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Bucharest in the 1930s. Although he became a historian and phenomenologist of religion within the field of religious studies, his approach, methodology, and analysis are informed by philosophical assumptions and philosophical normative judgments. In several of his writings, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Revisiting Current Causes of Women's Underrepresentation in Science.Carole J. Lee - forthcoming - In Jennifer Saul Michael Brownstein (ed.), Implicit Bias and Philosophy Volume 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    On the surface, developing a social psychology of science seems compelling as a way to understand how individual social cognition – in aggregate – contributes towards individual and group behavior within scientific communities (Kitcher, 2002). However, in cases where the functional input-output profile of psychological processes cannot be mapped directly onto the observed behavior of working scientists, it becomes clear that the relationship between psychological claims and normative philosophy of science should be refined. For example, a robust body of social (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  7
    BonJour's Way Out of the Sellarsian Dilemma and His Explanatory Account.Byeong D. Lee - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (2):287-304.
    BonJour claims that he has found a way out of the Sellarsian dilemma. In this paper, I argue for three claims to show that his alleged solution fails. First, there are two requirements for being a good reason, and BonJour’s notion of non-conceptual awareness of sensory experience faces a serious dilemma with regard to these requirements. Second, he derives his idea of the so-called “constitutive awareness of content” from his conception of conscious occurrent belief. But this conception also faces an (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  22
    McMullin's Augustinian Settlement.Paul Allen - 2012 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (2):331-342.
    In developing his trademark use of “consonance” to prescribe a relationship between Christian faith and the natural sciences, Ernan McMullin drew on severaldistinctly Augustinian philosophical and theological themes during his fifty years of scholarship. Particularly prominent in McMullin’s work were an emphasis placed on Augustine’s biblical hermeneutic, which prioritized both literal and non-literal interpretive techniques, and Augustine’s epistemology of divine illumination. This paper examines several elements as part of an expository account of McMullin’s contribution toward the consonance between Christian faith (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000