Results for 'Hate speech'

992 found
Order:
  1.  32
    Hate Speech Law: A Philosophical Examination.Alexander Brown - 2015 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    Hate speech law can be found throughout the world. But it is also the subject of numerous principled arguments, both for and against. These principles invoke a host of morally relevant features and practical considerations . The book develops and then critically examines these various principled arguments. It also attempts to de-homogenize hate speech law into different clusters of laws/regulations/codes that constrain uses of hate speech, so as to facilitate a more nuanced examination of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  2.  98
    Differentiating hate speech: a systemic discrimination approach.Katharine Gelber - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (4):1-22.
    In this paper I develop a systemic discrimination approach to defining a narrowly construed category of ‘hate speech’, as speech that harms to a sufficient degree to warrant government regulation. This is important due to the lack of definitional clarity, and the extraordinarily wide usage, of the term. This article extends current literature on how hate speech can harm by identifying under what circumstances speakers have the capacity to harm, and under what circumstances targets are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  3. Hate Speech, Dignity and Self-Respect.Jonathan Seglow - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (5):1103-1116.
    This paper engages with the recent dignity-based argument against hate speech proposed by Jeremy Waldron. It’s claimed that while Waldron makes progress by conceptualising dignity less as an inherent property and more as a civic status which hate speech undermines, his argument is nonetheless subject to the problem that there are many sources of citizens’ dignitary status besides speech. Moreover, insofar as dignity informs the grounds of individuals’ right to free speech, Waldron’s argument leaves (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4. How to talk back: hate speech, misinformation, and the limits of salience.Rachel Fraser - 2023 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 22 (3):315-335.
    Hate speech and misinformation are rife. How to respond? Counterspeech proposals say: with more and better speech. This paper considers the treatment of counterspeech in Maxime Lepoutre’s Democratic Speech In Divided Times. Lepoutre provides a nuanced defence of counterspeech. Some counterspeech, he grants, is flawed. But, he says: counterspeech can be debugged. Once we understand why counterspeech fails – when fail it does – we can engineer more effective counterspeech strategies. Lepoutre argues that the failures of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  11
    Hate speech mainstreaming in the Greek virtual public sphere: A quantitative and qualitative approach.Yannis Tsirbas & Lina Zirganou-Kazolea - forthcoming - Communications.
    This study delves into the manifestation and characteristics of hate speech in the Greek online public sphere, specifically exploring its most prominent forms, namely racism, anti-immigrant sentiment, nationalism, sexism, and homophobia/transphobia. Combining quantitative and qualitative methods, the research analyzes popular Greek online news media. It aims to uncover the visibility and operational patterns of hate speech, addressing key questions about its prevalence and presentation on these platforms. Findings reveal the normalization of discriminatory speech, particularly sexism (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Hate Speech.Luvell Anderson & Michael Randall Barnes - 2022 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    -/- Hate speech is a concept that many people find intuitively easy to grasp, while at the same time many others deny it is even a coherent concept. A majority of developed, democratic nations have enacted hate speech legislation—with the contemporary United States being a notable outlier—and so implicitly maintain that it is coherent, and that its conceptual lines can be drawn distinctly enough. Nonetheless, the concept of hate speech does indeed raise many difficult (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  55
    Hate Speech Laws: Expressive Power is Not the Answer.Maxime Lepoutre - 2019 - Legal Theory 25 (4):272-296.
    According to the influential “expressive” argument for hate speech laws, legal restrictions on hate speech are justified, in significant part, because they powerfully express opposition to hate speech. Yet the expressive argument faces a challenge: why couldn't we communicate opposition to hate speech via counterspeech, rather than bans? I argue that the expressive argument cannot address this challenge satisfactorily. Specifically, I examine three considerations that purport to explain bans’ expressive distinctiveness: considerations of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  25
    Hate Speech against Women Online: Concepts and Countermeasures.Louise Richardson-Self - 2021 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book aims to understand why women are the targets of online hate speech and how we can stop this from occurring.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Hate Speech and the Epistemology of Justice: Jeremy Waldron: The Harm in Hate Speech. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 2012.Rae Langton - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (4):865-873.
    In ‘The Harm in Hate Speech’ Waldron’s most interesting and ground-breaking contribution lies in a distinctive epistemological role he assigns to hate speech legislation: it is necessary for assurance of justice, and thus for justice itself. He regards public social recognition of what is owed to citizens as a public good, contributing to basic dignity and social standing of citizens. His claim that hate speech in the public social environment damages assurance of justice has (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  10.  41
    Hateful Speech and Hostile Environments.Ishani Maitra - 2021 - Australasian Philosophical Review 5 (2):150-159.
    ABSTRACT This paper examines Mary Kate McGowan’s account of oppressive speech. McGowan argues that ordinary hateful speech can oppress by enacting discriminatory norms, and further, that this enactment sometimes renders the speech regulable under current United States law. In response, the paper raises two sets of questions. First, it asks about the contents of the norms enacted by a given hateful utterance, and specifically, about what determines those contents. Second, the paper also questions McGowan’s emphasis on the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  46
    Differentiating hate speech: a systemic discrimination approach.Katharine Gelber - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (4):393-414.
    In this paper I develop a systemic discrimination approach to defining a narrowly construed category of ‘hate speech’, as speech that harms to a sufficient degree to warrant government regulation. This is important due to the lack of definitional clarity, and the extraordinarily wide usage, of the term. This article extends current literature on how hate speech can harm by identifying under what circumstances speakers have the capacity to harm, and under what circumstances targets are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  12. Hate Speech, the Priority of Liberty, and the Temptations of Nonideal Theory.Robert S. Taylor - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):353-68.
    Are government restrictions on hate speech consistent with the priority of liberty? This relatively narrow policy question will serve as the starting point for a wider discussion of the use and abuse of nonideal theory in contemporary political philosophy, especially as practiced on the academic left. I begin by showing that hate speech (understood as group libel) can undermine fair equality of opportunity for historically-oppressed groups but that the priority of liberty seems to forbid its restriction. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  28
    Against ‘Hate Speech’.Dirk Kindermann - 2023 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 40 (5):813-835.
    This article argues against the term and concept of ‘hate speech’ and in favour of using the concept and term ‘discriminatory speech’. ‘Hate speech’ is a misnomer; we should name the harmful speech in question by what it in fact does: it discriminates. The article argues for this conceptual replacement claim by identifying a number of functions the concept ‘hate speech’ has been meant to serve and by arguing that extant concepts of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  60
    Hate Speech as Antithetical to Free Speech: The Real Polarity.Tiffany Elise Montoya - 2023 - Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. Edited by Will Barnes.
    I claim that hate speech is actually antithetical to free speech. Nevertheless, this claim invokes the misconception that one would be jeopardizing free speech due to a phenomenon known as "false polarization" – a “tendency for disputants to overestimate the extent to which they disagree about whatever contested question is at hand.” The real polarity does not lie between hate speech (as protected free speech) vs. censorship. Rather, hate speech is censorship. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Hate Speech in Public Discourse: A Pessimistic Defense of Counterspeech.Maxime Lepoutre - 2017 - Social Theory and Practice 43 (4):851-883.
    Jeremy Waldron, among others, has forcefully argued that public hate speech assaults the dignity of its targets. Without denying this claim, I contend that it fails to establish that bans, rather than counterspeech, are the appropriate response. By articulating a more refined understanding of counterspeech, I suggest that counterspeech constitutes a better way of blocking hate speech’s dignitarian harm. In turn, I address two objections: according to the first, which draws on contemporary philosophy of language, counterspeech (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  16.  55
    Hate Speech and the Problems of Agency.Kory Schaff - 2000 - Social Philosophy Today 16:185-201.
    At the center of the hate speech controversy is the question whether it constitutes conduct. If hate speech is not conduct, then restricting it runs counter to free speech. But even if it could be shown that it is a kind of conduct, complicated questions arise. Does it necessarily follow that we restrict speech? Practically speaking, can speech even be restricted, either through new legislation or the enforcement of existing laws regulating conduct? Are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  55
    The eradication of hate speech on social media: a systematic review.Javier Gracia-Calandín & Leonardo Suárez-Montoya - 2023 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 21 (4):406-421. Translated by Jeremy Roe.
    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present a quantitative and qualitative synthesis of the diverse academic proposals and initiatives for preventing and eliminating hate speech on the internet. Design/methodology/approach The foundation for this study is a systematic review of papers devoted to the analysis of hate speech. It has been conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) protocol and applied to an initial corpus of 436 academic texts. Having implemented (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Hate Speech and the Limits of Free Speech.Gerald Lang - 2024 - In Carl Fox & Joe Saunders (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Philosophy and Media Ethics. Routledge. pp. 21-31.
    Hate speech involves the vilification of individuals for characteristics such as ethnicity, religion, and sex. The argument for and against the regulation of hate speech is controversial, partly because it remains unclear whether hate speech is encompassed by general arguments for free speech. Some think that the opportunity to engage in hate speech is the price we must pay for living in a democratic society where individuals take responsibility for what they (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  36
    Hate Speech in Public Discourse.Maxime Lepoutre - 2017 - Social Theory and Practice 43 (4):851-883.
    Jeremy Waldron, among others, has forcefully argued that public hate speech assaults the dignity of its targets. Without denying this claim, I contend that it fails to establish that bans, rather than counterspeech, are the appropriate response. By articulating a more refined understanding of counterspeech, I suggest that counterspeech constitutes a better way of blocking hate speech’s dignitarian harm. In turn, I address two objections: according to the first, which draws on contemporary philosophy of language, counterspeech (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  20. Hate-speech in Girard's reading of the Book of Job.Daniele Bertini - 2021 - Dialegesthai. Rivista Telematica di Filosofia 23.
    According to René Girard, all religious traditions - and so every tradition- originate from a communitarian violence towards a randomly chosen individual. I provide an introductory construal of Girard’s proposal in the first section of my paper. In the second section, I will address a conceptual view of the theory by making explicit its principles and their inferential relations. In the third section, I will explain how philosophers of language address slurs and hate-speech. Particularly, I will apply such (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  47
    Does hate speech express hate?Teresa Marques - 2022 - Justice Everywhere.
    In this post, Teresa Marques discusses her recent article in Journal of Applied Philosophy on whether hate is an essential component of hate speech. [blog post].
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The Red Cross and the Holocaust. By.Must We Defend Nazis & Hate Speech - 2002 - The European Legacy 7 (5):657-678.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Dignity, Harm, and Hate Speech.Robert Mark Simpson - 2013 - Law and Philosophy 32 (6):701-728.
    This paper examines two recent contributions to the hate speech literature – by Steven Heyman and Jeremy Waldron – which seek a justification for the legal restriction of hate speech in an account of the way that hate speech infringes against people’s dignity. These analyses look beyond the first-order hurts and disadvantages suffered by the immediate targets of hate speech, and consider the prospect of hate speech sustaining complex social structures (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  24.  31
    Hate Speech and Self-Restraint.Simon Thompson - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (3):657-671.
    In this article, my aim is to consider under what circumstances, and for what reasons, individuals may freely choose not to speak hatefully about others. Even if not threatened with legal sanction, why might they decide not to say something which they think they have good reason to say? My suggestion will be that there are various pro tanto reasons for individuals to restrain themselves from saying what they wanted to say. To be specific, I shall argue that such reasons (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Slurs, Pejoratives, and Hate Speech.Mihaela Popa-Wyatt - 2020 - Oxford Bibliographies in Philosophy.
  26. Hate Speech and Distorted Communication: Rethinking the Limits of Incitement.Sarah Sorial - 2015 - Law and Philosophy 34 (3):299-324.
    Hate speech is commonly defined with reference to the legal category of incitement. Laws targeting incitement typically focus on how the speech is expressed rather than its actual content. This has a number of unintended consequences: first, law tends to capture overt or obvious forms of hate speech and not hate speech that takes the form of ‘reasoned’ argument, but which nevertheless, causes as much, if not more harm. Second, the focus on form (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  4
    Hate Speech in Political Discourse.Ghaleb Rabab’ah, Asmaa Hussein & Samer Jarbou - forthcoming - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-20.
    The speeches delivered by Former U.S. President Donald Trump during his last presidential campaign (2015–2016) included hateful remarks against Muslims and immigrants. This study explored strategies of hate speech used in Trump’s political discourse against out-groups. The data consisted of a corpus of Trump’s speeches and interviews. Our analysis was based on Whillock’s [ 48 ] criteria of hate speech and Erjavec and Kovačič’s [ 13 ] strategies of hate speech. The results revealed that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Tracking Hate Speech Acts as Incitement to Genocide in International Criminal Law.Shannon Fyfe - 2017 - Leiden Journal of International Law 30 (2):523-548.
    In this article, I argue that we need a better understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of the current debates in international law surrounding hate speech and inchoate crimes. I construct a theoretical basis for speech acts as incitement to genocide, distinguishing these speech acts from speech as genocide and speech denying genocide by integrating international law with concepts drawn from speech act theory and moral philosophy. I use the case drawn on by many (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  15
    Hobbes against hate speech.Teresa M. Bejan - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 32 (2):247-264.
    ABSTRACT This article argues that Thomas Hobbes' analysis of insult or ‘contumely’ prefigures recent developments in moral and political philosophy in striking ways. Specifically, Hobbes's concerns about the dignitary harms in hate speech went well beyond ‘fighting words’ to the essential role played by expressions of hatred and contempt in making and unmaking social hierarchies. Hobbes’s sensitivity to contumely’s subtle power to constitute social in/equalities recalls recent work in feminist and critical race theory. Yet his expansive solutions – (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  5
    Hate Speech, the Compatibility of Regulatory Advocacy with Regulatory Opposition. 이혜정 - 2023 - Journal of Korean Philosophical Society 168:197-220.
    혐오 발언이란 단지 싫어한다거나 불쾌감을 주는 감정이 아니라 공동체에서 인종, 민족, 성적 지향 등 다양한 속성을 근거로 다수에 속해 있는 발화자가 취약한 위치에 있는 소수자를 모욕하고 차별하는 행위이다. 자유주의자는 혐오 발언에 대해 표현의 자유의 이름으로 사법적 제재를 가해서는 안 된다고 주장하지만 평등주의자는 권력이 불평등한 사회에서 발화자의 표현은 단지 표현이 아니라 힘의 행사이며 사회적 불평등을 강화하는 행위이며 따라서 사법적 제재를 허용해야 한다고 주장한다. 필자는 이러한 배경하에서 평등주의자가 주장하는 표현과 행위와의 인과적 힘에 대해 버틀러의 렌즈를 통해서 비판적으로 성찰한다. 발화자의 주권 권력은 영원하지도 (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  21
    Bangla hate speech detection on social media using attention-based recurrent neural network.Md Nur Hossain, Anik Paul, Abdullah Al Asif & Amit Kumar Das - 2021 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 30 (1):578-591.
    Hate speech has spread more rapidly through the daily use of technology and, most notably, by sharing your opinions or feelings on social media in a negative aspect. Although numerous works have been carried out in detecting hate speeches in English, German, and other languages, very few works have been carried out in the context of the Bengali language. In contrast, millions of people communicate on social media in Bengali. The few existing works that have been carried (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  62
    Hate Speech or “Reasonable Racism?” The Other in Stormfront.Priscilla Marie Meddaugh & Jack Kay - 2009 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 24 (4):251-268.
    We use the construct of the “other” to explore how hate operates rhetorically within the virtual conclave of Stormfront, credited as the first hate Web site. Through the Internet, white supremacists create a rhetorical vision that resonates with those who feel marginalized by contemporary political, social, and economic forces. However, as compared to previous studies of on-line white supremacist rhetoric, we show that Stormfront discourse appears less virulent and more palatable to the naive reader. We suggest that Stormfront (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. Measuring trends in online hate speech victimisation and exposure, and attitudes in New Zealand.Edgar Pacheco & Neil Melhuish - 2019 - Netsafe.
    Government agencies in New Zealand are not required to systematically collect data on online hate speech, thus, there is a lack of longitudinal evidence regarding this phenomenon. This report presents trends in personal experiences of and exposure to online hate speech among adult New Zealanders based on nationally representative data. The findings from this study are also compared with results from a similar research study conducted in 2018. In addition, this report explores people’s perceptions about other (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Pornography, Hate Speech, and Their Challenge to Dworkin's Egalitarian Liberalism.Abigail Levin - 2009 - Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (4):357-373.
    Contemporary egalitarian liberals—unlike their classical counterparts—have lived through many contentious events where the right to freedom of expression has been tested to its limits—the Skokie, Illinois, skinhead marches, hate speech incidents on college campuses, Internet pornography and hate speech sites, Holocaust deniers, and cross-burners, to name just a few. Despite this contemporary tumult, freedom of expression has been nearly unanimously affirmed in both the U.S. jurisprudence and philosophical discourse. In what follows, I will examine Ronald Dworkin's (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. What is hate speech? Part 1: The Myth of Hate.Alexander Brown - 2017 - Law and Philosophy 36 (4):419-468.
    The issue of hate speech has received significant attention from legal scholars and philosophers alike. But the vast majority of this attention has been focused on presenting and critically evaluating arguments for and against hate speech bans as opposed to the prior task of conceptually analysing the term ‘hate speech’ itself. This two-part article aims to put right that imbalance. It goes beyond legal texts and judgements and beyond the legal concept hate (...) in an attempt to understand the general concept hate speech. And it does so using a range of well-known methods of conceptual analysis that are distinctive of analytic philosophy. One of its main aims is to explode the myth that emotions, feelings, or attitudes of hate or hatred are part of the essential nature of hate speech. It also argues that hate speech is best conceived as a family resemblances concept. One important implication is that when looking at the full range of ways of combating hate speech, including but not limited to the use of criminal law, there is every reason to embrace an understanding of hate speech as a heterogeneous collection of expressive phenomena. Another is that it would be unsound to reject hate speech laws on the premise that they are effectively in the business of criminalising emotions, feelings, or attitudes of hate or hatred. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  36.  77
    Going beyond hate speech: The pragmatics of ethnic slur terms.Björn Technau - 2018 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 14 (1):25-43.
    Ethnic slur terms and other group-based slurs must be differentiated from general pejoratives and pure expressives. As these terms pejoratively refer to certain groups of people, they are a typical feature of hate speech contexts where they serve xenophobic speakers in expressing their hatred for an entire group of people. However, slur terms are actually far more frequently used in other contexts and are more often exchanged among friends than between enemies. Hate speech can be identified (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  37. Freedom of political speech, hate speech and the argument from democracy: The transformative contribution of capabilities theory.Katharine Gelber - 2010 - Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):304-324.
    Much of the most influential free speech scholarship emphasises that ‘political speech’ warrants the very highest standards of protection because of its centrality to self-governance. This central idea mitigates against efforts to justify the regulation of political speech and renders some egregiously offensive or harmful speech worthy of protection from a theoretical perspective. Yet paradoxically, in practice, in many liberal democracies such speech is routinely restricted. In this paper, I develop an argument that is compatible (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  38.  66
    Quarantining online hate speech: technical and ethical perspectives.Stefanie Ullmann & Marcus Tomalin - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 22 (1):69-80.
    In this paper we explore quarantining as a more ethical method for delimiting the spread of Hate Speech via online social media platforms. Currently, companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Google generally respondreactivelyto such material: offensive messages that have already been posted are reviewed by human moderators if complaints from users are received. The offensive posts are onlysubsequentlyremoved if the complaints are upheld; therefore, they still cause the recipients psychological harm. In addition, this approach has frequently been criticised for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. What is Hate Speech? Part 2: Family Resemblances.Alexander Brown - 2017 - Law and Philosophy 36 (5):561-613.
    The issue of hate speech has received significant attention from legal scholars and philosophers alike. But the vast majority of this attention has been focused on presenting and critically evaluating arguments for and against hate speech bans as opposed to the prior task of conceptually analysing the term ‘hate speech’ itself. This two-part article aims to put right that imbalance. It goes beyond legal texts and judgements and beyond the legal concept hate (...) in an attempt to understand the general concept hate speech. And it does so using a range of well-known methods of conceptual analysis that are distinctive of analytic philosophy. One of its main aims is to explode the myth that emotions, feelings, or attitudes of hate or hatred are part of the essential nature of hate speech. It also argues that hate speech is best conceived as a family resemblances concept. One important implication is that when looking at the full range of ways of combating hate speech, including but not limited to the use of criminal law, there is every reason to embrace an understanding of hate speech as a heterogeneous collection of expressive phenomena. Another is that it would be unsound to reject hate speech laws on the premise that they are effectively in the business of criminalising emotions, feelings, or attitudes of hate or hatred. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  40. Hate Speech and the Problems of Agency: A Critique of Butler.Kory Schaff - 2000 - Social Philosophy Today 16:185-201.
    At the center of the hate speech controversy is the question whether it constitutes conduct. If hate speech is not conduct, then restricting it runs counter to free speech. But even if it could be shown that it is a kind of conduct, complicated questions arise. Does it necessarily follow that we restrict speech? Practically speaking, can speech even be restricted, either through new legislation or the enforcement of existing laws regulating conduct? Are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Does Freedom of Speech Include Hate Speech?Caleb Yong - 2011 - Res Publica 17 (4):385-403.
    I take it that liberal justice recognises special protections against the restriction of speech and expression; this is what I call the Free Speech Principle. I ask if this Principle includes speech acts which might broadly be termed ‘hate speech’, where ‘includes’ is sensitive to the distinction between coverage and protection , and between speech that is regulable and speech that should be regulated . I suggest that ‘hate speech’ is too (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  42.  52
    Does Regulating Hate Speech Undermine Democratic Legitimacy? A Cautious ‘No’.Andrew Reid - 2020 - Res Publica 26 (2):181-199.
    This paper critiques the version of the argument that the regulation of hateful speech by the state undermines its democratic legitimacy made by Ronald Dworkin and James Weinstein. It argues that in some cases the harmful effects of hateful speech on the democratic process outweigh those of restriction. It does not challenge the central premise of the Legitimacy Argument, that a wide-ranging right to freedom of expression is an essential political right in a liberal democracy. Instead, it uses (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43. Measuring trends in online hate speech victimisation and exposure, and attitudes in New Zealand.Edgar Pacheco & Neil Melhuish - 2019 - Netsafe.
    Government agencies in New Zealand are not required to systematically collect data on online hate speech, thus, there is a lack of longitudinal evidence regarding this phenomenon. This report presents trends in personal experiences of and exposure to online hate speech among adult New Zealanders based on nationally representative data. The findings from this study are also compared with results from a similar research study conducted in 2018. In addition, this report explores people’s perceptions about other (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  32
    Hate Speech and Democracy.Stephen M. Feldman - 2013 - Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (1):78-90.
    Jeremy Waldron, The Harm in Hate Speech, 304 pp. The city of St. Paul, Minnesota, enacted a hate speech ordinance: Whoever places on public or privat...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  47
    Are Hate Speech Laws Useless? An Appraisal of Eric Heinze’s Arguments.Stéphane Courtois - 2022 - Res Publica 28 (2):249-269.
    Most Western democracies and international institutions have currently adopted a range of policies aimed at regulating hate speech. However, the kinds of target groups that hate speech regulations seek to protect have not been clearly defined yet. In a series of publications, Eric Heinze has challenged the coherence of such regulations. His core thesis is that hate speech laws have simply no place in longstanding, stable, and prosperous democracies. In this paper, I examine the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  40
    Legitimacy, Hate Speech, and Viewpoint Discrimination.Gideon Elford - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Philosophy:1-26.
    One of the most powerful arguments against state regulation of expression has, in recent years, been presented in a reinvigorated and developed form. The argument in question maintains that state regulation of expression undercuts the legitimacy of the law because it involves the suppression of a source of democratic contestation. The paper distinguishes between three importantly different versions of this legitimacy argument that existing work fails to clearly separate. Doing so is important because different forms of the legitimacy argument are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  27
    In search of hate speech in Lithuanian public discourse: A corpus-assisted analysis of online comments.Jurate Ruzaite - 2018 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 14 (1):93-116.
    The present paper aims to report on the preliminary findings from the initial stages of ongoing research on hate speech in Lithuanian online comments. Comments are marked strongly by such phenomena as flaming and trolling; therefore, in this genre we can expect a high degree of hostility, obscenity, high incidence of insults and aggressive lexis, which can inflict harm to individuals or organizations. The goal of the current research is thus to make an attempt to identify some features (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  58
    Covert Hate Speech, Conspiracy Theory and Anti-semitism: Linguistic Analysis Versus Legal Judgement.Fabienne Baider - 2022 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 35 (6):2347-2371.
    In this paper we focus on the difficulty in judging what is called covert hate speech. We emphasize the need for a multidimensional framework when analysing covert hate speech in situ, and the need to consider the multifaceted dimension of such speech act to assess its performativity. To explain such need, we apply the test of the Rabat Plan of Action and adopt a pragmatic perspective to analyse a specific covert hate speech act, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Is the ‘hate’ in hate speech the ‘hate’ in hate crime? Waldron and Dworkin on political legitimacy.Rebecca Ruth Gould - 2019 - Jurisprudence 10 (2):171-187.
  50.  28
    Hate Speech on Social Media.Elizabeth A. Park & Amos Guiora - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (3):957-971.
    This essay expounds on Raphael Cohen-Almagor’s recent book, Confronting the Internet’s Dark Side, Moral and Social Responsibility on the Free Highway, and advocates placing narrow limitations on hate speech posted to social media websites. The Internet is a limitless platform for information and data sharing. It is, in addition, however, a low-cost, high-speed dissemination mechanism that facilitates the spreading of hate speech including violent and virtual threats. Indictment and prosecution for social media posts that transgress from (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 992