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  1. Owen M. Fiss, The Irony of Free Speech:The Irony of Free Speech.Robert Amdur - 1999 - Ethics 109 (4):904-906.
  2. Amy Gutmann, Ed., Freedom of Association. [REVIEW]Erik Anderson - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19:183-185.
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  3. Amy Gu Tmann, Ed., Freedom of Association Reviewed By.Erik A. Anderson - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19 (3):183-185.
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  4. Rita Kirk Whillock and David Slayden (Eds). Hate Speech.W. L. Benoit - 1997 - Argumentation 11:381-383.
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  5. Expressive Association After Dale.David E. Bernstein - 2004 - Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (2):195-214.
    The right to join with other people to promote a particular outlook, known as the right of expressive association, is a necessary adjunct to the right of freedom of speech, which is protected by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. Freedom of speech would be of little practical consequence if the government could suppress ideas by bluntly prohibiting individuals from gathering with others who share their perspective. Freedom of expression must consist of more than the right to talk (...)
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  6. Is There a Right of Freedom of Expression? - by Larry Alexander.Brian Bix - 2007 - Philosophical Books 48 (3):285-286.
  7. Sex Skeptics: Speech is Free but Thought Remains In Chains. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Brake - 2000 - Reason Papers 25:101-112.
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  8. Millian Principles, Freedom of Expression, and Hate Speech.David O. Brink - 2001 - Legal Theory 7 (2):119-157.
    Hate speech employs discriminatory epithets to insult and stigmatize others on the basis of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other forms of group membership. The regulation of hate speech is deservedly controversial, in part because debates over hate speech seem to have teased apart libertarian and egalitarian strands within the liberal tradition. In the civil rights movements of the 1960s, libertarian concerns with freedom of movement and association and equal opportunity pointed in the same direction as egalitarian concerns with (...)
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  9. Hate Speech Law: A Philosophical Examination.Alex Brown - 2015 - Routledge.
    Hate speech law can be found throughout the world. But it is also the subject of numerous principled arguments, both for and against. These principles invoke a host of morally relevant features and practical considerations . The book develops and then critically examines these various principled arguments. It also attempts to de-homogenize hate speech law into different clusters of laws/regulations/codes that constrain uses of hate speech, so as to facilitate a more nuanced examination of the principled arguments. Finally, it argues (...)
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  10. Freedom of Association: It's Not What You Think.K. Brownlee - 2015 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 35 (2):267-282.
    This article shows that associative freedom is not what we tend to think it is. Contrary to standard liberal thinking, it is neither a general moral permission to choose the society most acceptable to us nor a content-insensitive claim-right akin to the other personal freedoms with which it is usually lumped such as freedom of expression and freedom of religion. It is at most a highly restricted moral permission to associate subject to constraints of consent, necessity and burdensomeness; a conditional (...)
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  11. Free Speech and Political Extremism: How Nasty Are We Free to Be? [REVIEW]Carl Cohen - 1988 - Law and Philosophy 7 (3):263 - 279.
  12. Copyright and Freedom of Expression: A Philosophical Map.Alexandra Couto - 2008 - In A. Gosseries, A. Marciano & A. Strowel (eds.), Intellectual Property and Theories of Justice. Palgrave.
  13. “Political Correctness” and Freedom of Speech in British Universities.Caroline Cox - 1994 - Minerva 32 (2):193-195.
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  14. Mécanisme Et Limites de L'Association Humaine.J. Novicow.Charles A. Ellwood - 1913 - International Journal of Ethics 23 (3):366-367.
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  15. Mecanisme Et Limites de l'Association Humaine, Par J. Novicow. [REVIEW]Charles A. Ellwood - 1912 - Ethics 23:366.
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  16. Review of Larry Alexander, Is There a Right of Freedom of Expression?[REVIEW]Ian P. Farrell - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (9).
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  17. Nancy J. Hirschmann on the Social Construction of Women's Freedom.Marilyn Friedman - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):182-191.
    : Nancy J. Hirschmann presents a feminist, social constructionist account of women's freedom. Friedman's discussion of Hirschmann's account deals with (1) some conceptual problems facing a thoroughgoing social constructionism; (2) three ways to modify social constructionism to avoid those problems; and (3) an assessment of Hirschmann's version of social constructionism in light of the previous discussion.
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  18. 'Speaking Back': The Likely Fate of Hate Speech Policy in the United States and Australia1.Katharine Gelber - 2012 - In Mary Kate McGowan Ishani Maitra (ed.), Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. pp. 50.
  19. "Created Equal": The Press and Hate Speech.Howard Good - 2003 - In Desperately Seeking Ethics: A Guide to Media Conduct. Scarecrow Press. pp. 87.
  20. Political Free Speech Ought to Be an Absolute.James A. Gould - 1982 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (1):65-70.
  21. Freedom of Association.Amy Gutmann (ed.) - 1998 - Princeton University Press.
    "This collection of essays is the best one-volume introduction to a timely topic: the nature, purposes, moral justifications of (and limitations on) freedom of association in liberal democracies.
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  22. Immigration and Freedom of Movement.Adam Hosein - 2013 - Ethics and Global Politics 6 (1):25-37.
    In this paper I focus on one very influential argument for open borders, the freedom of movement argument, which says that if we value freedom of movement we must demand open borders. I begin the paper the paper by discussing Joseph Carens’ well known version of the argument. I then consider, and reject, David Miller’s response to that argument. Finally, I develop my own reply to Carens. Both Carens and Miller, I argue, are mistaken about the proper grounds for freedom (...)
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  23. Religious Belief and Freedom of Expression: Is Offensiveness Really the Issue?Peter Jones - 2011 - Res Publica 17 (1):75-90.
    An objection frequently brought against critical or satirical expressions, especially when these target religions, is that they are ‘offensive’. In this article, I indicate why the existence of diverse and conflicting beliefs gives people an incentive to formulate their complaints in the language of offence. But I also cast doubt on whether people, in saying they are offended really mean to present that as the foundation of their complaint and, if they do, whether their complaint should weigh with us. These (...)
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  24. Tamil Web Blogs: A Boon for the Freedom of Expression.R. Shantha Mary Joshitta, J. Rayammal, R. Princitta & M. Prakash - 2011 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 21 (6):217-218.
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  25. Beyond Belief: Pragmatics in Hate Speech and Pornography1.Rae Langton - 2012 - In Mary Kate McGowan Ishani Maitra (ed.), Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. pp. 72.
  26. Larry Alexander, Is There a Right of Freedom of Expression? Reviewed By.Jon Mahoney - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (5):313-315.
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  27. The Public Ecology of Freedom of Association.Andres Moles - 2014 - Res Publica 20 (1):85-103.
    This paper defends the claim that private associations might be legitimately constrained by a requirement of reasonableness. I present a list of goods that freedom of association protect, and argue that the limits to associational freedom have to be sensitive to the nature of these goods. In defending this claim, I cast doubt on two popular liberal arguments: One is that attitudes cultivated in the private sphere are not likely to spill over into the public arena. The other is that (...)
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  28. Freedom of Thought and Expression in Eurocommunist Philosophy.Thomas Nemeth - 1985 - Studies in Soviet Thought 30 (4):397-406.
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  29. Responding to Hate Speech on Social Media.Molly B. Pepper, Adriane Leithauser, Peggy Sue Loroz & Brian Steverson - 2012 - International Journal of Cyber Ethics in Education 2 (4):45-54.
  30. Saunders, WK, Degradation: What the History of Obscenity Tells Us About Hate Speech; Heyman, JS, Free Speech and Human Dignity.Julija Perhat - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 34:111-116.
  31. Can Tolerance Be Grounded in Equal Respect?Enzo Rossi - 2013 - European Journal of Political Theory 12 (3):240-252.
    In this paper I argue that equal respect-based accounts of the normative basis of tolerance are self-defeating, insofar as they are unable to specify the limits of tolerance in a way that is consistent with their own commitment to the equal treatment of all conceptions of the good. I show how this argument is a variant of the long-standing ‘conflict of freedoms’ objection to Kantian-inspired, freedom-based accounts of the justification of systems of norms. I criticize Thomas Scanlon’s defence of ‘pure (...)
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  32. The Perp Walk: Due Process V. Freedom of the Press.Jim Ruiz & D. F. Treadwell - 2002 - Criminal Justice Ethics 21 (2):44-56.
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  33. Hate Speech and the Problems of Agency.Kory Schaff - 2000 - Social Philosophy Today 16:185-201.
    At the center of the hate speech controversy is the question whether it constitutes conduct. If hate speech is not conduct, then restricting it runs counter to free speech. But even if it could be shown that it is a kind of conduct, complicated questions arise. Does it necessarily follow that we restrict speech? Practically speaking, can speech even be restricted, either through new legislation or the enforcement of existing laws regulating conduct? Are measures such as hate crimes legislation both (...)
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  34. A Functional Examination of Hate Speech.Mattie Scott - 1997 - Semiotics:333-345.
  35. Hate Speech, Dignity and Self-Respect.Jonathan Seglow - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (5):1103-1116.
    This paper engages with the recent dignity-based argument against hate speech proposed by Jeremy Waldron. It’s claimed that while Waldron makes progress by conceptualising dignity less as an inherent property and more as a civic status which hate speech undermines, his argument is nonetheless subject to the problem that there are many sources of citizens’ dignitary status besides speech. Moreover, insofar as dignity informs the grounds of individuals’ right to free speech, Waldron’s argument leaves us balancing hate speakers’ dignity against (...)
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  36. Richard Moon, The Constitutional Protection of Freedom of Expression Reviewed By.Roger A. Shiner - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (3):196-199.
  37. Hate Speech and Distorted Communication: Rethinking the Limits of Incitement.Sarah Sorial - 2015 - Law and Philosophy 34 (3):299-324.
    Hate speech is commonly defined with reference to the legal category of incitement. Laws targeting incitement typically focus on how the speech is expressed rather than its actual content. This has a number of unintended consequences: first, law tends to capture overt or obvious forms of hate speech and not hate speech that takes the form of ‘reasoned’ argument, but which nevertheless, causes as much, if not more harm. Second, the focus on form rather than content leads to categorization errors. (...)
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  38. Law, Liberalism and Free Speech.D. F. B. Tucker - 1986 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  39. Freedom of Expression, Hate Speech, and Censorship.Peter Vallentyne - 1996 - For Good Reason.
    In a narrow sense, hate speech is symbolic representation that expresses, hatred, contempt, or disregard for another person or group of persons. The use of deeply insulting racial or ethnic epithets is an example of such hate speech. In a broader sense, hate speech also includes the symbolic representation of views are deeply offensive to others. The expression of the view that women are morally inferior to (or less intelligent than) men is example of hate speech in the broader sense. (...)
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  40. Mandatory School Uniforms and Freedom of Expression.Mark C. Vopat - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (3):203 - 215.
    On 10 December 2007 the Akron City School Board ? following the precedent set by many school systems across the United States and the world ? instituted a policy of mandatory school uniforms for all students in grades K?8. The measure was met with mixed reviews. While many parents supported the measure, a small group of parents from a selective, arts-focussed, middle school (grades 4?8) objected to the policy. It was their contention that children attending this particular school should be (...)
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  41. Limitations on Freedom of Expression.Jean Wahl - 1963 - World Futures 2 (sup001):32-35.
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  42. State Speech Vs. Hate Speech: What to Do About Words That Wound?Michael Weinman - 2006 - Essays in Philosophy 7 (1):18.
    This is, indeed, another work on the subject of hate speech regulation in the United States. And yet, it is not just another such work. For my goal here is not to settle the jurisprudential arguments regarding the possibility of any specific hate speech regulation, either extant or yet to be conceived, withstanding a Constitutional test. Nor is it my intention to demonstrate, on the basis of a comparative study of existing legislation, that such regulation either is or is not (...)
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  43. Free Speech.David Weissman - 1996 - Metaphilosophy 27 (4):339-355.
    Recognition of the harms done by free speech is a function of the social ontology presupposed. An atomist ontology implies that the harms suffered are restricted to individual people. This paper suggests an alternate ontology—one that describes systems established by the causal reciprocities of their proper parts. It proposes a consequentialist moral theory, and considers the harms suffered by these systems when speech exposes their internal, otherwise private, behaviors or features, when speech is malicious and false, and when speech is (...)
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Freedom of Assembly
  1. Commanding and Controlling Protest Crowds.Kylie Bourne - 2011 - Critical Horizons 12 (2):189-210.
    Police and authorities have increasingly adopted "command and control" strategies to the policing of intentionally peaceful protest crowds. These strategies work to close down access to a physical space in which a protest is to occur and thus in turn they effectively restrict the capacity of a citizen to engage in the democratic right of peaceful protest.
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  2. When the State Speaks What Should.Corey Brettschneider - 2010 - Perspectives on Politics.
  3. Civil Disobedience.Kimberley Brownlee - 2007 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  4. Citizens of Mars Ltd.Erik Persson - 2015 - In Charles S. Cockell (ed.), Human Governance Beyond Earth – Implications for Freedom. Springer. pp. 121-137.
    When the time comes to decide how to govern an extraterrestrial settlement there will be many alternatives to chose from. We will have the opportunity to try new and so far untested theories, but there are also some old forms of government that might be tempting to try again. We might for instance let the company whose activities on the world are the reason for the establishment govern the settlement. This has been tried before on our own planet both because (...)
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  5. Freedom of Assembly.Carl F. Taeusch - 1952 - Ethics 63 (1):33-43.
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Freedom of Association
  1. What is Freedom of Association, and What is its Denial?Larry Alexander - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (2):1-21.
    Freedom of association, as I understand it, refers to the liberty a person possesses to enter into relationships with others—for any and all purposes, for a momentary or long-term duration, by contract, consent, or acquiescence. It likewise refers to the liberty to refuse to enter into such relationships or to terminate them when not otherwise compelled by one's voluntary assumption of an obligation to maintain the relationship. Freedom of association thus is a quite capacious liberty.
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  2. Security and the 'War on Terror': A Roundtable.Julian Baggini, Alex Voorhoeve, Catherine Audard, Saladin Meckled-Garcia & Tony McWalter - 2007 - In Julian Baggini & Jeremy Stangroom (eds.), What More Philosophers Think. Continuum.
    What is the appropriate legal response to terrorist threats? This question is discussed by politician Tony McWalter, The Philosophers' Magazine editor Julian Baggini, and philosophers Catherine Audard, Saladin Meckled-Garcia, and Alex Voorhoeve.
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