Results for 'Marygold Walsh-Dilley'

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  1.  42
    Editor's Introduction: D. M. Walsh.D. M. Walsh - 2001 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 49:1-21.
    The papers collected in this volume are the proceedings of the 1999 Royal Institute of Philosophy conference: the theme of the conference, the same as the title of this collection, Naturalism, Evolution and Mind. The essays collected here cover a wide array of disparate themes in philosophy, psychology, evolutionary biology and the philosophy of science. They range in subject matter from the mind/body problem and the nature of philosophical naturalism, to the naturalization of psychological norms to the naturalization of phenomenal (...)
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  2.  29
    Kant as Seen by Hegel: W. H. Walsh.W. H. Walsh - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:93-109.
    Few major philosophers show evidence of having studied the works of their predecessors with special care, even in cases where they were subject to particular influences which they were ready to acknowledge. Hume knew that he was working in the tradition of ‘some late philosophers in England, who have begun to put the science of man on a new footing’—‘Mr Locke, my Lord Shaftsbury, Dr Mandeville, Mr Hutchinson, Dr Butler, &c.’ But there is not much sign in the Treatise or (...)
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  3.  31
    Hume's Concept of Truth: W. H. Walsh.W. H. Walsh - 1971 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 5:99-116.
    Hume's explicit pronouncements about truth are few and unenlightening. In a well-known passage near the beginning of Book III of the Treatise he writes that ‘Reason is the discovery of truth or falsehood. Truth or falsehood consists in an agreement or disagreement either to the real relations of ideas, or to real existence and matter of fact.’ Hume's main concern in this passage, however, is not with the concept of truth, but with his thesis that moral distinctions are not derived (...)
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  4.  16
    Is the Free Will Defence Irrelevant?: FRANK B. DILLEY.Frank B. Dilley - 1982 - Religious Studies 18 (3):335-364.
    Recently Steven E. Boër gave another turn to the discussion of the free will defence by claiming that the free will defence is irrelevant to the justification of moral evil. Conceding that free will may be of real value, Boër claims that free will could have been allowed creatures without that leading to any moral evil at all. What I shall hereafter refer to as the ‘Boër reform’ is the suggestion that God could have allowed creatures to exercise free choices (...)
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  5.  11
    Resurrection and the ‘Replica Objection’: FRANK B. DILLEY.Frank B. Dilley - 1983 - Religious Studies 19 (4):459-474.
    Resurrection has been used as the conceptual basis for attempted solutions to two problems that occur in the context of western theism, the problem of cognitive meaning and the problem of theodicy. Because John Hick has proposed resurrection as a solution to both problems so extensively, and because Antony Flew and Terence Penelhum have examined those solutions so strenuously, I will use their writings to lay out the problem. My aim is to improve upon Hick by overcoming a weakness in (...)
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  6.  8
    An Analysis of Some of J. J. C. Smart's Objections to the ‘Proofs’: FRANK B. DILLEY.Frank B. Dilley - 1969 - Religious Studies 4 (2):245-251.
    I submit as a good rule of thumb that if a discussion of any major philosophical position or proposition ends with the conclusion that that position or proposition is ‘absurd’ or ‘meaningless’ then a mistake has been made in the discussion. The mistake often turns out to be the accuser's failure to appreciate precisely what the position being attacked really is.
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  7. A Hundred Years of Philosophy From the Slater & Walsh Collections: Exhibition and Catalogue.John G. Slater & Frederick Michael Walsh (eds.) - 2008 - Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto.
     
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  8. Philosophy & Bibliophily: An Exhibition Introducing the Walsh Philosophy Collection: The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto, 26 January-30 April 2004. [REVIEW]Frederick Michael Walsh (ed.) - 2004 - University of Toronto.
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  9. Walsh, V.-Rationality, Allocation, and Reproduction.A. Walsh - 1998 - Philosophical Books 39:271-272.
     
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  10. Substance and Form in History a Collection of Essays in Philosophy of History.Leon Pompa, William H. Dray & W. H. Walsh - 1981
     
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  11. Substance and Form in History a Collection of Essays in Philosophy of History /Edited by L. Pompa and W.H. Dray. --. --.Leon Pompa, William H. Dray & William Henry Walsh - 1981 - University Press, C1981.
     
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  12.  21
    Haroon Akram-Lodhi and Cristóbal Kay (Eds): Peasants and Globalization: Political Economy, Rural Transformation and the Agrarian Question. [REVIEW]Marygold Walsh-Dilley - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (2):287-288.
  13.  19
    Localizing Control: Mendocino County and the Ban on GMOs. [REVIEW]Marygold Walsh-Dilley - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):95-105.
    In March, 2004, the rural northern California county of Mendocino voted to ban the propagation of all genetically modified organisms (GMOs). This county was the first, and only, U.S. region to adopt such a ban despite widespread activism against biotechnology. Using a civic agriculture perspective, this article explores how local actors in this small county were able to take on the agri-biotechnology industry. I argue that by localizing the issue, the citizens of Mendocino County were able to ignite a highly (...)
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  14. Not a Sure Thing: Fitness, Probability, and Causation.Denis M. Walsh - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (2):147-171.
    In evolutionary biology changes in population structure are explained by citing trait fitness distribution. I distinguish three interpretations of fitness explanations—the Two‐Factor Model, the Single‐Factor Model, and the Statistical Interpretation—and argue for the last of these. These interpretations differ in their degrees of causal commitment. The first two hold that trait fitness distribution causes population change. Trait fitness explanations, according to these interpretations, are causal explanations. The last maintains that trait fitness distribution correlates with population change but does not cause (...)
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  15. Organisms, Agency, and Evolution.D. M. Walsh - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    The central insight of Darwin's Origin of Species is that evolution is an ecological phenomenon, arising from the activities of organisms in the 'struggle for life'. By contrast, the Modern Synthesis theory of evolution, which rose to prominence in the twentieth century, presents evolution as a fundamentally molecular phenomenon, occurring in populations of sub-organismal entities - genes. After nearly a century of success, the Modern Synthesis theory is now being challenged by empirical advances in the study of organismal development and (...)
     
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  16. Living Poetically: Kierkegaard's Existential Aesthetics.Sylvia Walsh - 1994 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    _Living Poetically_ is the first book to focus primarily on Kierkegaard's existential aesthetics as opposed to traditional aesthetic features of his writings such as the use of pseudonyms, literary techniques and figures, and literary criticism. _Living Poetically_ traces the development of the concept of the poetic in Kierkegaard's writings as that concept is worked out in an ethical-religious perspective in contrast to the aesthetics of early German romanticism and Hegelian idealism. Sylvia Walsh seeks to elucidate what it means, in Kierkegaard's (...)
     
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  17.  51
    The Case for a Notation-Independent Representation of Number.Stanislas Dehaene, Roi Cohen Kadosh & Vincent Walsh - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):333.
    Cohen Kadosh & Walsh (CK&W) neglect the solid empirical evidence for a convergence of notation-specific representations onto a shared representation of numerical magnitude. Subliminal priming reveals cross-notation and cross-modality effects, contrary to CK&W's prediction that automatic activation is modality and notation-specific. Notation effects may, however, emerge in the precision, speed, automaticity, and means by which the central magnitude representation is accessed.
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  18.  23
    Kierkegaard: Thinking Christianly in an Existential Mode.Sylvia Walsh - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Sylvia Walsh explores Kierkegaard's understanding of Christianity and the existential mode of thinking theologically appropriate to it in the context of the ...
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  19.  18
    The Modern Philosophical Revolution: The Luminosity of Existence.David Walsh - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Modern Philosophical Revolution breaks new ground by demonstrating the continuity of European philosophy from Kant to Derrida. Much of the literature on European philosophy has emphasised the breaks that have occurred in the course of two centuries of thinking. But as David Walsh argues, such a reading overlooks the extent to which Kant, Hegel, and Schelling were already engaged in the turn toward existence as the only viable mode of philosophising. Where many similar studies summarise individual thinkers, this book (...)
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  20.  23
    Ayn Rand and the Metaphysics of Kant.George V. Walsh - 2000 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 2 (1):69 - 103.
    George V. Walsh examines the differences and similarities between Immanuel Kant and Ayn Rand in the area of metaphysics. He presents Kant's premises and conclusions on the major issues and provides a detailed discussion of Rand's criticisms of Kant. Walsh argues that Rand has seriously misread Kant on several points. Her interpretation—that Kant saw our sensory grasp of the world as "delusion," rather than knowledge—resembles that of Arthur Schopenhauer, except that the latter declares Kant's doctrine worthy of praise instead of (...)
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  21.  61
    Aristotle's Conception of Freedom.Moira M. Walsh - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):495-507.
    Aristotle's Conception of Freedom MOIRA M. WALSH That human being is free, we say, who exists for his own sake and not for another's. ' 1. INTRODUCTION THERE IS NO PLACE in the Nicomachean Ethics, or the Politics, where Aristotle provides us with an explicit definition of freedom. Nevertheless, it is possible to glean Aristotle's notion of freedom from a series of passages in the Politics, in which Aristotle discusses such matters as the existence of the natural slave, and the (...)
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  22.  61
    Symbolic, Numeric, and Magnitude Representations in the Parietal Cortex.Miriam Rosenberg-Lee, Jessica M. Tsang, Vinod Menon, Roi Cohen Kadosh & Vincent Walsh - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):350.
    We concur with Cohen Kadosh & Walsh (CK&W) that representation of numbers in the parietal cortex is format dependent. In addition, we suggest that all formats do not automatically, and equally, access analog magnitude representation in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Understanding how development, learning, and context lead to differential access of analog magnitude representation is a key question for future research.
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  23. Kierkegaard: Fear and Trembling.C. Stephen Evans & Sylvia Walsh (eds.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this rich and resonant work, Soren Kierkegaard reflects poetically and philosophically on the biblical story of God's command to Abraham, that he sacrifice his son Isaac as a test of faith. Was Abraham's proposed action morally and religiously justified or murder? Is there an absolute duty to God? Was Abraham justified in remaining silent? In pondering these questions, Kierkegaard presents faith as a paradox that cannot be understood by reason and conventional morality, and he challenges the universalist ethics and (...)
     
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  24. Living Christianly: Kierkegaard's Dialectic of Christian Existence.Sylvia Walsh - 2005 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    The pseudonymous works Kierkegaard wrote during the period 1843–46 have been responsible for establishing his reputation as an important philosophical thinker, but for Kierkegaard himself, they were merely preparatory for what he saw as the primary task of his authorship: to elucidate the meaning of what it is to live as a Christian and thus to show his readers how they could become truly Christian. The more overtly religious and specifically Christian works Kierkegaard produced in the period 1847–51 were devoted (...)
     
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  25. Monasteries and the Care of Souls in Late Antique Christianity: Cognition and Discipline.Paul C. Dilley - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Monasteries and the Care of Souls in Late Antique Christianity, Paul C. Dilley explores the personal practices and group rituals through which the thoughts of monastic disciples were monitored and trained to purify the mind and help them achieve salvation. Dilley draws widely on the interdisciplinary field of cognitive studies, especially anthropology, in his analysis of key monastic 'cognitive disciplines', such as meditation on scripture, the fear of God, and prayer. In addition, various rituals distinctive to communal monasticism, including (...)
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  26. Freedom: Dvd.Ken Knisely, David Walsh & Mark Murphy - unknown - Milk Bottle Productions.
    From Locke to Kierkegaard to those annoying car ads that promise “No Boundaries”— Is our use of the word 'freedom' still coherent? Was it ever coherent? Is it significant that this fuzzy term is so often used to carry so much rhetorical force? With Larry Hatab , David Walsh , and Mark Murphy.
     
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  27. Freedom: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed.Ken Knisely, Larry Hatab, David Walsh & Mark Murphy - forthcoming - DVD.
    From Locke to Kierkegaard to those annoying car ads that promise “No Boundaries”— Is our use of the word 'freedom' still coherent? Was it ever coherent? Is it significant that this fuzzy term is so often used to carry so much rhetorical force? With Larry Hatab , David Walsh , and Mark Murphy.
     
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  28. Feminist Interpretations of Søren Kierkegaard.Celine Leon & Sylvia Walsh (eds.) - 1997 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Unlike many of the major figures in Western philosophy, Kierkegaard explores many issues of interest to feminist theorists today. Moreover, he does so in a style—labyrinthine, many-voiced, multilayered, adverse to authority—that adumbrates _écriture féminine_. A major question probed in the volume is whether Kierkegaard's writings are misogynist, ambivalent, or essentialist in their views of women and the feminine or whether, in some important and vital ways, they are liberatory and empowering for feminists and women trying to free themselves from the (...)
     
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  29. Ayn Rand And The Metaphysics Of Kant.George Walsh - 2000 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 1 (3):69-103.
    GEORGE V. WALSH examines the differences and similarities between Immanuel Kant and Ayn Rand in the area of metaphysics. He presents Kant's premises and conclusions on the major issues and provides a detailed discussion of Rand's criticisms of Kant. Walsh argues that Rand has seriously misread Kant on several points. Her interpretation that Kant saw our sensory grasp of the world as "delusion," rather than knowledge, resembles that of Arthur Schopenhauer, except that the latter declares Kant's doctrine worthy of praise (...)
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  30. Counterrevolution and Repression in the Politics of Education: At the Midnight of Dissent.Sean Noah Walsh - 2013 - Lexington Books.
    In this book, Sean Noah Walsh applies Herbert Marcuse’s observations on counterrevolution to recent developments in education politics. Seemingly disparate issues such as the exercise of state power to reorganize curricula, the derision of intellectuals, the permeation of consumerism into the collegiate experience, and the expansion of online teaching belong to the same strategy in which the faculties of dissent are neutralized before they can develop and dissent is established as the paramount political obscenity.
     
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  31. Living Christianly: Kierkegaard's Dialectic of Christian Existence.Sylvia Walsh - 2007 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    The pseudonymous works Kierkegaard wrote during the period 1843–46 have been responsible for establishing his reputation as an important philosophical thinker, but for Kierkegaard himself, they were merely preparatory for what he saw as the primary task of his authorship: to elucidate the meaning of what it is to live as a Christian and thus to show his readers how they could become truly Christian. The more overtly religious and specifically Christian works Kierkegaard produced in the period 1847–51 were devoted (...)
     
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  32. Living Poetically: Kierkegaard's Existential Aesthetics.Sylvia Walsh - 2005 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    _Living Poetically_ is the first book to focus primarily on Kierkegaard's existential aesthetics as opposed to traditional aesthetic features of his writings such as the use of pseudonyms, literary techniques and figures, and literary criticism. _Living Poetically_ traces the development of the concept of the poetic in Kierkegaard's writings as that concept is worked out in an ethical-religious perspective in contrast to the aesthetics of early German romanticism and Hegelian idealism. Sylvia Walsh seeks to elucidate what it means, in Kierkegaard's (...)
     
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  33. Newton's Scaffolding: The Instrumental Roles of His Optical Hypotheses.Kirsten Walsh - 2019 - In Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    Early modern experimental philosophers often appear to commit to and utilise corpuscular and mechanical hypotheses. This is somewhat mysterious, for such hypotheses frequently appear to be simply assumed, which is odd for a research program which emphasises the careful experimental accumulation of facts. Isaac Newton was one such experimental philosopher, and his optical work is considered a clear example of the experimental method. Focusing on his optical investigations, Walsh identifies three roles for hypotheses. First, Newton introduces a hypothesis to explicate (...)
     
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  34. The Consolation of Philosophy.Peter Walsh (ed.) - 1999 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Boethius composed the Consolatio Philosophiae in the sixth century AD whilst awaiting death under torture. He had been condemned on a charge of treason which he protested was manifestly unjust. Though a convinced Christian, in detailing the true end of life which is the soul's knowledge of God, he consoled himself not with Christian precepts but with the tenets of Greek philosophy. This work dominated the intellectual world of the Middle Ages; writers as diverse as Thomas Aquinas, Jean de Meun, (...)
     
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  35. The Fruit of the Vine: Viticulture in Ancient Israel.Carey Ellen Walsh (ed.) - 2000 - Brill.
    The practice of viticulture in Israelite culture is the focus of Walsh's investigation. Viticulture, no less than drinking, marked the social sphere of Israelite practitioners, and so its details were often enlisted to describe social relations in the Hebrew Bible.
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  36.  6
    The Growth of the Liberal Soul.David Walsh - 1997 - University of Missouri.
    In The Growth of the Liberal Soul, David Walsh confronts a core difficulty of the liberal democratic tradition in explaining and justifying itself.
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  37. The Nature of the Gods.P. G. Walsh (ed.) - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Cicero's philosophical works are now exciting renewed interest, in part because he provides vital evidence of the views of the Greek philosophers of the Hellenistic age, and partly because of the light he casts on the intellectual life of first century Rome. This edition uses the 1997 Clarendon text by the acclaimed translator P.G. Walsh.
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  38.  21
    The Score Takes Care of Itself: My Philosophy of Leadership.Bill Walsh - 2009 - Portfolio.
    The last lecture on leadership by the NFL's greatest coach: Bill Walsh Bill Walsh is a towering figure in the history of the NFL.
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  39. The Veil of Signs: Joyce, Lacan, and Perception. [REVIEW]Michael Walsh - 1993 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 14 (4):401-404.
    Sheldon Brivic has an immediately idealist and ultimately religious view of language and literature; he is devoted to Berkeley and Hegel, turns phenomenology into what he wittily calls "phonemonology" , and is much preoccupied with the individuality, personality, and god-like authority of the author. For Brivic, history is mainly important insofar as it passes through the mind of the author , and political criticism is readily construed as "narrowly political" , particularly if it seems insufficiently respectful of a favored character. (...)
     
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  40. A Theory of Magnitude: Common Cortical Metrics of Time, Space and Quantity.V. Walsh - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (11):483-488.
  41. The Trials of Life: Natural Selection and Random Drift.Denis M. Walsh, Andre Ariew & Tim Lewens - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 69 (3):452-473.
    We distinguish dynamical and statistical interpretations of evolutionary theory. We argue that only the statistical interpretation preserves the presumed relation between natural selection and drift. On these grounds we claim that the dynamical conception of evolutionary theory as a theory of forces is mistaken. Selection and drift are not forces. Nor do selection and drift explanations appeal to the (sub-population-level) causes of population level change. Instead they explain by appeal to the statistical structure of populations. We briefly discuss the implications (...)
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  42. The Pomp of Superfluous Causes: The Interpretation of Evolutionary Theory.Denis M. Walsh - 2007 - Philosophy of Science 74 (3):281-303.
    There are two competing interpretations of the modern synthesis theory of evolution: the dynamical (also know as ‘traditional’) and the statistical. The dynamical interpretation maintains that explanations offered under the auspices of the modern synthesis theory articulate the causes of evolution. It interprets selection and drift as causes of population change. The statistical interpretation holds that modern synthesis explanations merely cite the statistical structure of populations. This paper offers a defense of statisticalism. It argues that a change in trait frequencies (...)
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  43. Evolutionary Essentialism.Denis Walsh - 2006 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):425-448.
    According to Aristotelian essentialism, the nature of an organism is constituted of a particular goal-directed disposition to produce an organism typical of its kind. This paper argues—against the prevailing orthodoxy—that essentialism of this sort is indispensable to evolutionary biology. The most powerful anti-essentialist arguments purport to show that the natures of organisms play no explanatory role in modern synthesis biology. I argue that recent evolutionary developmental biology provides compelling evidence to the contrary. Developmental biology shows that one must appeal to (...)
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  44.  65
    Fast Backprojections From the Motion to the Primary Visual Area Necessary for Visual Awareness.Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Vincent Walsh - 2001 - Science 292 (5516):510-512.
  45. The Intractable Rivalry.Stephen Craig Dilley - 2006 - Ars Disputandi 6:1566-5399.
     
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  46. Husserl's Concept of Motivation: The Logical Investigations and Beyond.Philip J. Walsh - 2013 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 16:70-83.
    Husserl introduces a phenomenological concept called “motivation” early in the First Investigation of his magnum opus, the Logical Investigations. The importance of this concept has been overlooked since Husserl passes over it rather quickly on his way to an analysis of the meaningful nature of expression. I argue, however, that motivation is essential to Husserl’s overall project, even if it is not essen- tial for defining expression in the First Investigation. For Husserl, motivation is a relation between mental acts whereby (...)
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  47. Logicism, Interpretability, and Knowledge of Arithmetic.Sean Walsh - 2014 - Review of Symbolic Logic 7 (1):84-119.
    A crucial part of the contemporary interest in logicism in the philosophy of mathematics resides in its idea that arithmetical knowledge may be based on logical knowledge. Here an implementation of this idea is considered that holds that knowledge of arithmetical principles may be based on two things: (i) knowledge of logical principles and (ii) knowledge that the arithmetical principles are representable in the logical principles. The notions of representation considered here are related to theory-based and structure-based notions of representation (...)
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  48. Fitness and Function.D. M. Walsh - 1996 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (4):553-574.
    According to historical theories of biological function, a trait's function is determined by natural selection in the past. I argue that, in addition to historical functions, ahistorical functions ought to be recognized. I propose a theory of biological function which accommodates both. The function of a trait is the way it contributes to fitness and fitness can only be determined relative to a selective regime. Therefore, the function of a trait can only be specified relative to a selective regime. Apart (...)
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  49.  47
    State-Dependency in Brain Stimulation Studies of Perception and Cognition.Juha Silvanto, Neil Muggleton & Vincent Walsh - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (12):447-454.
  50. Subjective Discriminability of Invisibility: A Framework for Distinguishing Perceptual and Attentional Failures of Awareness.Ryota Kanai, Vincent Walsh & Chia-Huei Tseng - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1045-1057.
    Conscious visual perception can fail in many circumstances. However, little is known about the causes and processes leading to failures of visual awareness. In this study, we introduce a new signal detection measure termed subjective discriminability of invisibility that allows one to distinguish between subjective blindness due to reduction of sensory signals or to lack of attentional access to sensory signals. The SDI is computed based upon subjective confidence in reporting the absence of a target . Using this new measure, (...)
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