139 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Rupert Read [120]R. Read [13]Rupert J. Read [5]R. C. Read [1]
See also
Rupert Read
University of East Anglia
Robert Read
University of Oklahoma
Rebecca Gurney-Read
Nottingham University
1 more
  1.  88
    The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary & Rupert Read (eds.) - 2000 - Routledge.
    This text offers major re-evaluation of Wittgenstein's thinking. It is a collection of essays that presents a significantly different portrait of Wittgenstein. The essays clarify Wittgenstein's modes of philosophical criticism and shed light on the relation between his thought and different philosophical traditions and areas of human concern. With essays by Stanley Cavell, James Conant, Cora Diamond, Peter Winch and Hilary Putnam, we see the emergence of a new way of understanding Wittgenstein's thought. This is a controversial collection, with essays (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  2. The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary, Rupert Read, Timothy G. Mccarthy, Sean C. Stidd, David Charles & William Child - 2005 - Mind 114 (453):129-137.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  3. The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary & Rupert Read - 2003 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 193 (4):481-482.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  4. Toward a Perspicuous Presentation of "Perspicuous Presentation".Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):141–160.
    Gordon Baker in his last decade published a series of papers (now collected in Baker 2004), which are revolutionary in their proposals for understanding of later Wittgenstein. Taking our lead from the first of those papers, on "perspicuous presentations," we offer new criticisms of 'elucidatory' readers of later Wittgenstein, such as Peter Hacker: we argue that their readings fail to connect with the radically therapeutic intent of the 'perspicuous presentation' concept, as an achievement-term, rather than a kind of 'objective' mapping (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  5.  46
    The New Hume Debate.Rupert Read & Kenneth Richman (eds.) - 2000 - Routledge.
    First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  6. The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary & Rupert Read - 2003 - Philosophy 78 (305):425-430.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  7. The New Hume Debate.Rupert Read & Kenneth A. Richman - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (299):125-129.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  8. Film as Philosophy: Essays on Cinema After Wittgenstein and Cavell.Rupert Read & Jerry Goodenough (eds.) - 2005 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  9.  3
    Toward a Perspicuous Presentation of “Perspicuous Presentation”1.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2008 - Philosophical Investigations 31 (2):141-160.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  10.  8
    There is No Such Thing as Social Science: In Defence of Peter Winch. [REVIEW]Phil Hutchinson, Rupert Read & Wes Sharrock - 2009 - Analysis 69 (4):795-797.
    This provocative, engaging and important book marks the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Peter Winch's seminal The Idea of a Social Science. The authors – the first two philosophers, the third a sociologist – have worked together in various permutations before. No-one familiar with their previous publications will be surprised that the dominant voice throughout is Wittgenstein's – that is, Wittgenstein as read ‘resolutely’ by ‘new Wittgensteinians’. They have three principal aims: first, to read Winch's own work in an (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  11. An Elucidatory Interpretation of Wittgenstein's Tractatus: A Critique of Daniel D. Hutto's and Marie McGinn's Reading of Tractatus 6.54.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):1 – 29.
    Much has been written on the relative merits of different readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The recent renewal of the debate has almost exclusively been concerned with variants of the ineffabilist (metaphysical) reading of TL-P - notable such readings have been advanced by Elizabeth Anscombe, P. M. S. Hacker and H. O. Mounce - and the recently advanced variants of therapeutic (resolute) readings - notable advocates of which are James Conant, Cora Diamond, Juliet Floyd and Michael Kremer. During this debate, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  12. A Wittgensteinian Way with Paradoxes.Rupert Read - 2012 - Lexington Books.
    A Wittgensteinian way with paradoxes tackles some of the classic philosophical paradoxes that have puzzled philosophers over the centuries and explores how they can be dissolved using the ‘therapeutic’ method of Wittgenstein, according to the ‘resolute’ reading of the latter’s work. The book shows how, by contrast, we should give more serious consideration to real, ‘lived paradoxes’, some of which can be harmful psychically, morally or politically, but others of which can be beneficial.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  42
    “Nothing is Shown”: A ‘Resolute’ Response to Mounce, Emiliani, Koethe and Vilhauer.Rupert Read & Rob Deans - 2003 - Philosophical Investigations 26 (3):239-268.
  14.  78
    On Approaching Schizophrenia Through Wittgenstein.Rupert Read - 2001 - Philosophical Psychology 14 (4):449 – 475.
    Louis Sass disputes that schizophrenia can be understood successfully according to the hitherto dominant models--for much of what schizophrenics say and do is neither regressive (as psychoanalysis claims) nor just faulty reasoning (as "cognitivists" claim). Sass argues instead that schizophrenics frequently exhibit hyper-rationality, much as philosophers do. He holds that schizophrenic language can after all be interpreted--if we hear it as Wittgenstein hears solipsistic language. I counter first that broadly Winchian considerations undermine both the hermeneutic conception of interpreting other humans (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  15. The New Hume Debate: Revised Edition.Rupert Read & Kenneth Richman (eds.) - 2008 - Routledge.
    For decades scholars thought they knew Hume's position on the existence of causes and objects he was a sceptic. However, this received view has been thrown into question by the `new readings of Hume as a sceptical realist. For philosophers, students of philosophy and others interested in theories of causation and their history, The New Hume Debate is the first book to fully document the most influential contemporary readings of Hume's work. Throughout, the volume brings the debate beyond textual issues (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  21
    Wittgenstein Among the Sciences: Wittgensteinian Investigations Into the "Scientific Method".Rupert J. Read - 2011 - Ashgate.
    Acknowledgments -- Preface -- Editor's introduction -- Wittgenstein, Kuhn, and natural science : science : a perspicuous presentation -- Kuhn : the Wittgenstein of the sciences? -- Kuhn on incommensurability : inhabiting the standard reading -- Wittgenstein on incommensurability : the view from "inside" -- Values : another kind of incommensurability? -- Does Kuhn have a model of science? -- Inter-section : a schematic elicitation of Wittgensteinian criteria -- Wittgenstein, Winch, and "human science" : social science -- The ghost of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  29
    De‐Mystifying Tacit Knowing and Clues: A Comment on Henry Et Al.Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):944-947.
  18.  49
    The Heart of What Matters: The Role for Literature in Moral Philosophy.Rupert Read - 2003 - Mind 112 (447):506-509.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  19.  51
    Guardians of the Future.Rupert Read - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 57 (57):27-28.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20.  66
    Iv *-Throwing Away 'the Bedrock'.Rupert Read - 2005 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):81-98.
    If one is impressed with Wittgenstein's philosophizing, then it is a deep mistake to think that the terms that he made famous-philosophical terms like 'form of life', 'language-game', 'everyday', 'bedrock'-are the key to his philosophy. On the contrary, they are in the end an obstacle to be overcome. The last temptation of the Wittgensteinian philosopher is to treat these terms as providing a kind of ersatz foundation. They are rather a ladder that takes one... to where one already is, only (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  21.  55
    A No-Theory?: Against Hutto on Wittgenstein.Rupert Read - 2006 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (1):73–81.
  22.  19
    Beyond Just Justice – Creating Space for a Future‐Care Ethic.Ruth Makoff & Rupert Read - 2017 - Philosophical Investigations 40 (3):223-256.
    Distributive justice relies on metaphors about spatial distribution. Modelling cross-temporal relations on cross-spatial relations in this way obscures how earlier groups become the later ones. Procedural justice metaphors rely on metaphors of contract and thereby on impartial reasoning. Their dominance is already problematic in the case of contemporary relations, but is even more so in the case of relations across time, where the conditions for later parties are controlled and created by earlier ones. Future generations should not be thought of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Thomas Kuhn's Misunderstood Relation to Kripke-Putnam Essentialism.Rupert Read & Wes Sharrock - 2002 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33 (1):151-8.
    Kuhn's ‘taxonomic conception’ of natural kinds enables him to defend and re-specify the notion of incommensurability against the idea that it is reference, not meaning/use, that is overwhelmingly important. Kuhn's ghost still lacks any reason to believe that referentialist essentialism undercuts his central arguments in SSR – and indeed, any reason to believe that such essentialism is even coherent, considered as a doctrine about anything remotely resembling our actual science. The actual relation of Kuhn to Kripke-Putnam essentialism, is as follows: (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24. Beyond the Tractatus Wars: The New Wittgenstein Debate.Rupert Read & Matthew A. Lavery (eds.) - 2011 - Routledge.
    Over fifteen years have passed since Cora Diamond and James Conant turned Wittgenstein scholarship upside down with the program of “resolute” reading, and ten years since this reading was crystallized in the major collection _The New Wittgenstein_. This approach remains at the center of the debate about Wittgenstein and his philosophy, and this book draws together the latest thinking of the world’s leading Tractatarian scholars and promising newcomers. Showcasing one piece alternately from each “camp”, _Beyond the Tractatus Wars_ pairs newly (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25.  70
    On Philosophy's Progress: From Plato to Wittgenstein : R. Read.R. Read - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (3):341-367.
    I argue that the type of progress exhibited by philosophy is not that exhibited by science, but rather is akin to the kind of progress exhibited be someone becoming ‘older and wiser’. However, as actually-existing philosophy has gotten older, it has not always gotten wiser. As an illustration, I consider Rawls's conception of justification. I argue that Rawls's notion of what it is to have a philosophical justification exhibits no progress at all from Euthyphro's. In fact, drawing on a remark (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  26
    Wittgenstein and the Illusion of ‘Progress’: On Real Politics and Real Philosophy in a World of Technocracy.Rupert Read - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:265-284.
    ‘You can’t stop progress’, we are endlessly told. But what is meant by “progress”? What is “progress” toward? We are rarely told. Human flourishing? And a culture? That would be a good start – but rarely seems a criterion for ‘progress’. Rather, ‘progress’ is simply a process, that we are not allowed, apparently, to stop. Or rather: it would be futile to seek to stop it. So that we are seemingly-deliberately demoralised into giving up even trying.Questioning the myth of ‘progress’, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  21
    Beyond Just Justice – Creating Space for a Future‐Care Ethic.Ruth Makoff & Rupert Read - 2016 - Philosophical Investigations 39 (4).
    Distributive justice relies on metaphors about spatial distribution. Modelling cross-temporal relations on cross-spatial relations in this way obscures how earlier groups become the later ones. Procedural justice metaphors rely on metaphors of contract and thereby on impartial reasoning. Their dominance is already problematic in the case of contemporary relations, but is even more so in the case of relations across time, where the conditions for later parties are controlled and created by earlier ones. Future generations should not be thought of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Feminism and Trans-Women.Rupert Read - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):26-28.
  29.  2
    Metaphysics Is Metaphorics: Philosophical and Ecological Reflections From Wittgenstein and Lakoff on the Pros and Cons of Linguistic Creativity.Rupert Read - 2016 - In Sebastian Sunday Grève & Jakub Mácha (eds.), Wittgenstein and the Creativity of Language. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 264-297.
    In the main bulk of this chapter, I offer a Wittgensteinian take on infinity and deduce from this some Wittgensteinian criticisms of Chomsky on ‘creativity’, treating this as one among many examples of how metaphors, following the understanding of Lakoff and Johnson, following Wittgenstein, can delude one into metaphysics. As per my title, ‘metaphysics’ turns out to be, really, nothing other than metaphorics in disguise. Our aim in philosophy, then, is to turn latent metaphors into patent metaphors. When we do (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  28
    What 'There Can Be No Such Thing as Meaning Anything by Any Word' Could Possibly Mean.Rupert Read - 2000 - In Alice Crary & Rupert Read (eds.), The New Wittgenstein. Routledge.
  31.  17
    Introduction: ‘Post-Truth’?Rupert Read & Timur Uçan - 2019 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 8:5-22.
    This paper introduces the Special Issue on 'post-truth'. The contributions to this special issue try between them to strike a right balance. To establish how new ‘post-truthism’ really is – or isn’t. To seek a point of reflection on whatever is new in our current socio-political straits. And to consider seriously how philosophy can help. Whether by wondering about the extent to which reason, or truth, may rightly, if one follows Wittgenstein, be viewed in certain respects as a constraint upon (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Why There Cannot Be Any Such Thing as “Time Travel”.Rupert Read - 2012 - Philosophical Investigations 35 (2):138-153.
    Extending work of Wittgenstein, Lakoff and Johnson I suggest that it is the metaphors we rely on in order to conceptualise time that provide an illusory space for time-travel-talk. For example, in the “Moving Time” spatialisation of time, “objects” move past the agent from the future to the past. The objects all move in the same direction – this is mapped to time always moving in the same direction. But then it is easy to imagine suspending this rule, and asking (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  2
    Guardians of the Future.Rupert Read - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 57:27-28.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  36
    Wittgenstein and Zen Buddhism: One Practice, No Dogma.Rupert Read - 2009 - In Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.), Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 13--23.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  11
    Thomas Kuhn.Rupert Read - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):162-163.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36.  38
    Throwing Away 'the Bedrock'.Rupert Read - 2005 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):81–98.
    If one is impressed with Wittgenstein's philosophizing, then it is a deep mistake to think that the terms that he made famous-philosophical terms like 'form of life', 'language-game', 'everyday', 'bedrock'-are the key to his philosophy. On the contrary, they are in the end an obstacle to be overcome. The last temptation of the Wittgensteinian philosopher is to treat these terms as providing a kind of ersatz foundation. They are rather a ladder that takes one... to where one already is, only (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  30
    The `Hard' Problem of Consciousness Is Continually Reproduced and Made Harder by All Attempts to Solve It.R. Read - 2008 - Theory, Culture and Society 25 (2):51-86.
  38.  92
    Is ‘What is Time?’ A Good Question to Ask?Rupert Read - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (2):193-210.
    Dummett in his recent paper in Philosophy replies in the negative to the question, “Is time a continuum of instants?” But Dummett seems to think that this negative reply entails giving an alternative theoretical account; he nowhere canvasses the possibility that there is something amiss with the question. In other words, Dummett thinks that he still has to reply to the question, “What (then) is time?” I offer no answer whatsover to such ‘questions’. Rather, I ask what it could possibly (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  28
    Against 'Time–Slices'.Rupert Read - 2003 - Philosophical Investigations 26 (1):24–43.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40.  38
    Wittgenstein in Exile by James C. Klagge (Review).Rupert Read & Jessica Woolley - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):499-500.
    James Klagge aims to shed light on Wittgenstein’s philosophy by situating it in its biographical–cultural context. While Klagge is not alone in pursuing this aim, his claim to originality lies in his thematic focus on Wittgenstein’s relationship to his time and culture as one of “alienation” (3), expressed by the metaphor of being “in exile” (61). A central concern of Klagge’s is how we, as modern readers living in a “civilized” culture not dissimilar to the one from which Wittgenstein felt (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Wittgenstein and Literary Language.Jon Cook & Rupert Read - 2010 - In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
  42.  69
    The Road Since ‘Structure’.Rupert Read - 2004 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (1):175-178.
  43.  27
    Book Review: How and How Not to Write on a “Legendary” Philosopher. [REVIEW]R. Read - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (3):369-387.
    The author argues that Fuller’s book, with the single exception of its correct reinterpretation of Kuhn as no apostle of postmodernism—such that his “fans” and “foes” alike are boxing with (or cheering on) only a shadow Kuhn—is worse than worthless. For, in a disreputable and outright propagandistic fashion, it consists in a series of serious distortions of and outright falsehoods about Kuhn and recent philosophy of science, distortions and falsehoods which may well mislead the unwary reader. Nickles’ s collection by (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Marx and Wittgenstein on Vampires and Parasites: A Critique of Capital and Metaphysics.Rupert Read - 2002 - In G. N. Kitching & Nigel Pleasants (eds.), Marx and Wittgenstein: Knowledge, Morality and Politics. Routledge. pp. 35--254.
  45.  15
    Why ‘Swampman’ Would Not Even Get as Far as Thinking It Was Davidson: On the Spatio‐Temporal Basis of Davidson's Conjuring Trick.Rupert Read & Bo Allesøe - 2019 - Philosophical Investigations 42 (4):350-366.
    Philosophical Investigations, EarlyView.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  64
    Meaningful Consequences.Rupert Read & James Guetti - 1999 - Philosophical Forum 30 (4):289–315.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  10
    What Is New in Our Time.Rupert Read - 2019 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 8:81-96.
    Finlayson argues that ‘post-truth’ is nothing new. In this response, I motivate a more modest position: that it is something new, to some extent, albeit neither radically new nor brand new. I motivate this position by examining the case of climate-change-denial, called by some post-truth before 'post-truth'. I examine here the nature of climate-denial. What precisely are its attractions?; How do they manage to outweigh its glaring, potentially-catastrophic downsides? I argue that the most crucial of all attractions of climate-denial is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  8
    IV—Throwing Away ‘The Bedrock’.Rupert Read - 2005 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):81-98.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  34
    Literature as Philosophy of Psychopathology: William Faulkner as Wittgenstein.Rupert J. Read - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):115-124.
  50.  23
    Wittgenstein and Marx on ‘Philosophical Language’.Rupert Read - 2000 - Essays in Philosophy 1 (2):2.
1 — 50 / 139