Results for 'Steven Bosworth'

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  1.  16
    Motives and comprehension in a public goods game with induced emotions.Simon Bartke, Steven J. Bosworth, Dennis J. Snower & Gabriele Chierchia - 2019 - Theory and Decision 86 (2):205-238.
    This study analyses the sensitivity of public goods contributions through the lens of psychological motives. We report the results of a public goods experiment in which subjects were induced with the motives of care and anger through autobiographical recall. Subjects’ preferences, beliefs, and perceptions under each motive are compared with those of subjects experiencing a neutral autobiographical recall control condition. We find, but only for those subjects with the highest comprehension of the game, that care elicits significantly higher contributions than (...)
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  2.  54
    Navigating Motivation: A Semantic and Subjective Atlas of 7 Motives.Gabriele Chierchia, Marisa Przyrembel, Franca Parianen Lesemann, Steven Bosworth, Dennis Snower & Tania Singer - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11:568064.
    Research from psychology, neurobiology and behavioral economics indicates that a binary view of motivation, based on approach and avoidance, may be too reductive. Instead, a literature review suggests that at least seven distinct motives are likely to affect human decisions: “consumption/resource seeking,” “care,” “affiliation,” “achievement,” “status-power,” “threat approach” (or anger), and “threat avoidance” (or fear). To explore the conceptual distinctness and relatedness of these motives, we conducted a semantic categorization task. Here, participants were to assign provided words to one of (...)
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  3.  15
    Steven V. Hicks, International Law and the Possibility of a Just World Order: An Essay on Hegel's Universalism , pp. 272. ISBN 90-420-0495-9. [REVIEW]Steve Bosworth - 2001 - Hegel Bulletin 22 (1-2):113-117.
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  4.  34
    Motive and Rightness.Steven Sverdlik - 2011 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK.
    Motive and Rightness is the first book-length attempt to answer the question, Does the motive of an action ever make a difference in whether that action is morally right or wrong? Steven Sverdlik argues that the answer is yes. His book examines the major theories now being discussed by moral philosophers to see if they can provide a plausible account of the relevance of motives to rightness and wrongness. Sverdlik argues that consequentialism gives a better account of these matters (...)
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  5. What you see is what you set: Sustained inattentional blindness and the capture of awareness.Steven B. Most, Brian J. Scholl, Erin R. Clifford & Daniel J. Simons - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (1):217-242.
  6.  39
    The faculty of language: what's special about it?Steven Pinker & Ray Jackendoff - 2005 - Cognition 95 (2):201-236.
  7.  15
    Constant battles: the myth of the peaceful, noble savage.Steven A. LeBlanc - 2003 - New York: St. Martin's Press. Edited by Katherine E. Register.
    With armed conflict in the Persian Gulf now upon us, Harvard archaeologist Steven LeBlanc takes a long-term view of the nature and roots of war, presenting a controversial thesis: The notion of the "noble savage" living in peace with one another and in harmony with nature is a fantasy. In Constant Battles: The Myth of the Peaceful, Noble Savage , LeBlanc contends that warfare and violent conflict have existed throughout human history, and that humans have never lived in ecological (...)
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  8. Nirvana and Other Buddhist Felicities: Utopias of the Pali Imaginaire.Steven Collins - 1999 - Utopian Studies 10 (1):176-179.
  9.  78
    Aristotelian virtue and business ethics education.Steven M. Mintz - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (8):827 - 838.
    In recent years there has been an increased interest in the application of Aristotelian virtue to business ethics. The objective of this paper is to describe the moral and intellectual virtues defined by Aristotle and the types of pedagogy that might be used to integrate virtue ethics into the business curriculum. Virtues are acquired human qualities, the excellences of character, which enable a person to achieve the good life. In business, the virtues facilitate successful cooperation and enable the community to (...)
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  10.  7
    The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine.Steven H. Miles - 2004 - New York: Oup Usa.
    This short work examines what the Hippocratic Oath said to Greek physicians 2400 years ago and reflects on its relevance to medical ethics today. Drawing on the writings of ancient physicians, Greek playwrights, and modern scholars, each chapter explores one passage of the Oath and concludes with a modern case discussion. This book is for anyone who loves medicine and is concerned about the ethics and history of the profession.
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  11.  31
    Mapping the Moral Terrain of Clinical Research.Steven Joffe & Franklin G. Miller - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 38 (2):30-42.
    Medical research is widely thought to have a fundamentally therapeutic orientation, in spite of the fact that clinical research is thought to be ethically distinct from medical care. We need an entirely new conception of clinical research ethics—one that looks to science instead of the doctor‐patient relationship.
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  12. Lifelines: biology beyond determinism.Steven Peter Russell Rose - 1998 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Reductionism--understanding complex processes by breaking them into simpler elements--dominates scientific thinking around the world and has certainly proved a powerful tool, leading to major discoveries in every field of science. But reductionism can be taken too far, especially in the life sciences, where sociobiological thinking has bordered on biological determinism. Thus popular science writers such as Richard Dawkins, author of the highly influential The Selfish Gene, can write that human beings are just "robot vehicles blindly programmed to preserve the selfish (...)
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  13. Humean Externalism and the Argument from Depression.Steven Swartzer - 2015 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (2):1-16.
    Several prominent philosophers have argued that the fact that depressed agents sometimes make moral judgments without being appropriately motivated supports Humean externalism – the view that moral motivation must be explained in terms of desires that are distinct from or “external” to an agent’s motivationally inert moral judgments. This essay argues that such motivational failures do not, in fact, provide evidence for this view. I argue that, if the externalist argument from depression is to undermine a philo-sophically important version of (...)
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  14. The nature of the language faculty and its implications for evolution of language (Reply to Fitch, Hauser, and Chomsky).Steven Pinker - 2005 - Cognition 97 (2):211-225.
    In a continuation of the conversation with Fitch, Chomsky, and Hauser on the evolution of language, we examine their defense of the claim that the uniquely human, language-specific part of the language faculty (the “narrow language faculty”) consists only of recursion, and that this part cannot be considered an adaptation to communication. We argue that their characterization of the narrow language faculty is problematic for many reasons, including its dichotomization of cognitive capacities into those that are utterly unique and those (...)
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  15. Epistemological Intelligence.Steven James Bartlett - 2017 - Willamette University Faculty Research Website.
    2022 UPDATE: The approach of this monograph has been updated and developed further in Appendix II, "Epistemological Intelligence," of the author’s 2021 book _Critique of Impure Reason: Horizons of Possibility and Meaning_. The book is available both in a printed edition (under ISBN 978-0-578-88646-6 from Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and other booksellers) and an Open Access eBook edition (available through Philpapers under the book’s title and other philosophy online archives). ●●●●● -/- The monograph’s twofold purpose is to recognize epistemological intelligence (...)
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  16.  62
    Normality Does Not Equal Mental Health: The Need to Look Elsewhere for Standards of Good Psychological Health.Steven James Bartlett - 2011 - Santa Barbara, CA, USA: Praeger.
    Normality Does Not Equal Mental Health: The Need to Look Elsewhere for Standards of Good Mental Health is the first book to question the equation of psychological normality and mental health. It is also the first book to take contemporary psychiatry and clinical psychology to task for deeply flawed thinking when they accept the diagnostic system propounded by the DSM, which reifies syndromes into alleged “mental disorders.” Where Thomas Szasz argued that “mental disorders” are myths, Bartlett makes the much more (...)
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  17.  49
    The Dissolution of Objects: Between Platonism and Phenomenalism.Steven French & James Ladyman - 2003 - Synthese 136 (1):73-77.
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  18. Dostoevsky's Religion.Steven Cassedy - 2007 - Studies in East European Thought 59 (1):163-165.
     
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  19.  83
    The effectiveness of corporate codes of ethics.Steven Weller - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (5):389 - 395.
    While the focus on business ethics is increasing in business school curricula, there has been little systematic scholarly research on the forces which bring about ethical behavior. This article is intended as a first step toward that research by creating a catalogue of hypotheses concerning the efficacy of corporate codes of ethics. The hypotheses are drawn from studies of compliance with law and court decisions and theories of legitimacy, authority, public policy making and individual behavior. Hypotheses are proposed based on (...)
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  20. A Code of Conduct for Peer Reviewers and Editors.Steven James Bartlett - 2019 - Willamette University Faculty Research Website.
    In the past few decades, peer review has come to dominate virtually all professionally respectable academic and scientific publications. However, despite its near-universal acceptance, no code of conduct has been developed to which peer reviewers and their editors are encouraged to adhere. This paper proposes such a code of conduct.
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  21.  19
    Abolition of cyclic activity changes following amygdaloid lesions in rats.Steven G. Barta, Ernest D. Kemble & Eric Klinger - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (3):236-238.
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  22.  70
    The naked truth: Positive, arousing distractors impair rapid target perception.Steven B. Most, Stephen D. Smith, Amy B. Cooter, Bethany N. Levy & David H. Zald - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (5):964-981.
  23. Sokal's Hoax.Steven Weinberg - 1996 - New York Review of Books 13:11-15.
    Like many other scientists, I was amused by news of the prank played by the NYU mathematical physicist Alan Sokal. Late in 1994 he submitted a sham article to the cultural studies journal Social Text, in which he reviewed some current topics in physics and mathematics, and with tongue in cheek drew various cultural, philosophical and political morals that he felt would appeal to fashionable academic commentators on science who question the claims of science to objectivity.
     
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  24. Collective responsibility.Steven Sverdlik - 1987 - Philosophical Studies 51 (1):61 - 76.
    More than one person can be responsible for a particular state of affairs--In this sense collective moral responsibility does indeed exist. However, Even in such cases, Moral responsibility is still fundamentally individualized since each agent responsible for a particular state of affairs is responsible for his/her actions which have the intention of producing this state of affairs.
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  25. Acedia: The Etiology of Work-engendered Depression.Steven James Bartlett - 1990 - New Ideas in Psychology 8 (3):389-396.
    There has been a general failure among mental health theorists and social psychologists to understand the etiology of work-engendered depression. Yet the condition is increasingly prevalent in highly industrialized societies, where an exclusionary focus upon work, money, and the things that money can buy has displaced values that traditionally exerted a liberating and humanizing influence. Social critics have called the result an impoverishment of the spirit, a state of cultural bankruptcy, and an incapacity for genuine leisure. From a clinical perspective, (...)
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  26. What counts as an Individual for Spinoza?Steven Barbone - 2002 - In Olli Koistinen & J. I. Biro (eds.), Spinoza: Metaphysical Themes. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 89-112.
    Very close analysis of Baruch Spinoza's wording in describing individuals rather than things. Individuals, but not collections such as a political state or club, each have their own specific conatus, or essence. Collectivities, like nations or institutions, fail to meet this necessary condition of individuation.
     
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  27. Conviction and Rationality.Steven James Bartlett - 2016 - Willamette University Faculty Research Website.
    A short paper presented before the Fellows of the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions during the academic year 1969-70, with an Introductory Note written nearly 50 years later. The paper describes the author's enduring personal philosophical precept; it is also an implicit encomium to individuals whose psychology establishes a dependable bridge between their rational convictions and their conduct.
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  28. Environmental Philosophy after the End of Nature.Steven Vogel - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (1):23-39.
    I call for “postnaturalism” in environmental philosophy—for an environmental philosophy that no longer employs the concept nature. First, the term is too ambiguous and philosophically dangerous and, second, McKibben and others who argue that nature has already ended are probably right—except that perhaps nature has always already ended. Poststructuralism, environmental history, and recent science studies all point in the same direction: the world we inhabit is always already one transformed by human practices. Environmental questions are social and political ones, to (...)
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  29. CRITIQUE OF IMPURE REASON: Horizons of Possibility and Meaning.Steven James Bartlett - 2021 - Salem, USA: Studies in Theory and Behavior.
    PLEASE NOTE: This is the corrected 2nd eBook edition, 2021. ●●●●● _Critique of Impure Reason_ has now also been published in a printed edition. To reduce the otherwise high price of this scholarly, technical book of nearly 900 pages and make it more widely available beyond university libraries to individual readers, the non-profit publisher and the author have agreed to issue the printed edition at cost. ●●●●● The printed edition was released on September 1, 2021 and is now available through (...)
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  30.  33
    Scribbling on the blank sheet: Eddington's structuralist conception of objects.Steven French - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 34 (2):227-259.
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  31.  29
    Treatment effectiveness, generalizability, and the explanatory/pragmatic-trial distinction.Steven Tresker - 2022 - Synthese 200 (4):1-29.
    The explanatory/pragmatic-trial distinction enjoys a burgeoning philosophical and medical literature and a significant contingent of support among philosophers and healthcare stakeholders as an important way to assess the design and results of randomized controlled trials. A major motivation has been the need to provide relevant, generalizable data to drive healthcare decisions. While talk of pragmatic and explanatory trials could be seen as convenient shorthand, the distinction can also be seen as harboring deeper issues related to inferential strategies used to evaluate (...)
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  32. Mysticism and Philosophical Analysis.Steven T. Katz - 1979 - Religious Studies 15 (1):132-132.
     
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  33.  64
    Quantum gravity.Steven Weinstein - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  34. Superluminal Signaling and Relativity.Steven Weinstein - 2006 - Synthese 148 (2):381-399.
    Special relativity is said to prohibit faster-than-light (superluminal) signaling, yet controversy regularly arises as to whether this or that physical phenomenon violates the prohibition. I argue that the controversy is a result of a lack of clarity as to what it means to ‘signal’, and I propose a criterion. I show that according to this criterion, superluminal signaling is not prohibited by special relativity.
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  35. Mysticism and Religious Traditions.Steven T. Katz - 1985 - Religious Studies 21 (3):417-419.
  36. Animal rights, one step at a time.Steven M. Wise - 2004 - In Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.), Animal rights: current debates and new directions. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 19.
  37.  28
    The Double Explanation in the Timaeus.Steven K. Strange - 1985 - Ancient Philosophy 5 (1):25-39.
  38.  68
    Crime and Moral Luck.Steven Sverdlik - 1988 - American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (1):79 - 86.
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  39.  49
    The Pathology of Man: A Study of Human Evil.Steven James Bartlett - 2005 - Springfield, IL, USA: Charles C. Thomas.
    The Pathology of Man is the first comprehensive study of the psychology and epistemology of human evil, long urged by leading psychiatrists and psychologists, including Freud, Jung, Menninger, Fromm, and Peck. The book breaks new ground by offering a clear, empirically based, and theoretically sound understanding of human evil as a widespread, real, non-metaphorical pathology. With deliberate and thorough scholarship the author proposes a new framework-relative theory of disease and justifies the provocative thesis that human evil should be classified as (...)
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  40.  54
    Phenomenology and phenomenography in educational research: A critique.Steven A. Stolz - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (10):1077-1096.
    The use of phenomenology and phenomenography as a method in the educational research literature has risen in popularity, particularly by researchers who are interested in understanding and generati...
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  41. Race, Ideology, and the Communicative Theory of Punishment.Steven Swartzer - 2019 - Philosophers' Imprint 19:1-22.
    This paper explores communicative punishment from a non-idealized perspective. I argue that, given the specific racial dynamics involved, and given the broader social and historical context in which they are embedded, American policing and punishment function as a form of racially derogatory discourse. Understood as communicative behavior, criminal justice activities express a commitment to a broader ideology. Given the facts about how the American justice system actually operates, and given its broader socio-political context, American carceral behaviors express a commitment to (...)
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  42. Mysticism and Philosophical Analysis.Steven T. Katz - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (208):255-257.
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  43.  18
    Theoretical and clinical disease and the biostatistical theory.Steven Tresker - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 82:101249.
  44. The species problem and its logic: Inescapable ambiguity and framework-relativity.Steven James Bartlett - 2015 - Willamette University Faculty Research Website, ArXiv.Org, and Cogprints.Org.
    For more than fifty years, taxonomists have proposed numerous alternative definitions of species while they searched for a unique, comprehensive, and persuasive definition. This monograph shows that these efforts have been unnecessary, and indeed have provably been a pursuit of a will o’ the wisp because they have failed to recognize the theoretical impossibility of what they seek to accomplish. A clear and rigorous understanding of the logic underlying species definition leads both to a recognition of the inescapable ambiguity that (...)
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  45. Conceptual Therapy: An Introduction to Framework-relative Epistemology.Steven James Bartlett - 1984/2014 - St. Louis, MO: Studies in Theory and Behavior.
    An introductory text describing the author’s approach to epistemology in terms of self-referential argumentation and self-validating proofs. The text emphasizes a skill-based, rather than content-based, approach to the study of epistemology. The book is a simply stated, basic text whose purpose is to introduce students to the technical approach to epistemology developed by the author in other publications. ●●●●● -/- 2022 UPDATE: The approach of this book has been updated and developed further in the author’s 2021 book _Critique of Impure (...)
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  46. Jean-Paul Sartre: Key Concepts (Kindle e-book edition).Steven Churchill & Jack Reynolds (eds.) - 2013 - Durham: Routledge.
    Most readers of Sartre focus only on the works written at the peak of his influence as a public intellectual in the 1940s, notably "Being and Nothingness". "Jean-Paul Sartre: Key Concepts" aims to reassess Sartre and to introduce readers to the full breadth of his philosophy. Bringing together leading international scholars, the book examines concepts from across Sartre's career, from his initial views on the "inner life" of conscious experience, to his later conceptions of hope as the binding agent for (...)
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  47.  96
    Consistency Among Intentions and the ‘Simple View’.Steven Sverdlik - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (4):515-522.
    What is the relation between the intention to A and doing A intentionally? It is natural to suppose that the latter entails the former. That is, it is natural to accept what Michael Bratman has called the ‘Simple View’ of the relation between acting intentionally and having an intention. Bratman is one noteworthy writer who has denied that the Simple View is true. In the present paper I do not defend this view. I contend that one well-known argument that Bratman (...)
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  48. Varieties of Reasons/Motives Internalism.Steven Arkonovich - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (3):210-219.
    Under what conditions do you have a reason to perform some action? Do you only have reason to do what you want to do? Reasons-motives internalism is the appealingly simple view that unless an agent is, or could be, motivated to act in a certain way, he has no normative reason to act in that way. Thus, according to reasons-motives internalism, facts about an individual’s motivational psychology constrain what is rational for that agent to do. This article canvasses several ways (...)
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  49. Gravity and gauge theory.Steven Weinstein - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (3):155.
    Gauge theories are theories that are invariant under a characteristic group of "gauge" transformations. General relativity is invariant under transformations of the diffeomorphism group. This has prompted many philosophers and physicists to treat general relativity as a gauge theory, and diffeomorphisms as gauge transformations. I argue that this approach is misguided.
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  50.  46
    Lifelines: life beyond the gene.Steven Peter Russell Rose - 2003 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In Life Beyond the Gene, Steven Rose offers a theory of life which insists that we as humans -- and indeed all living creatures -- create our own futures, though in circumstances not of our own choosing. Placing the organism at the center of life, Rose confronts the ideology of reductionism and ultra-Darwinism, with its insistence that all aspects of human life from sexual preference to infanticide, political orientation to violence, male domination to alcoholism, are in our genes and (...)
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