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  1. Philip Abbott (1999). Utopia by Hypnosis: V.F. Calverton's The Man Inside and American Radicalism in the 1930s. Utopian Studies 10 (2):70 - 88.
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  2. A. Alexander, A. Andrew, Kallio Sakari & Revonsuo Antti (2007). Hypnosis Induces a Changed Composition of Brain Oscillations in EEG: A Case Study. Contemporary Hypnosis 24 (1):3-18.
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  3. Daniel L. Araoz (2001). The Unconscious in Ericksonian Hypnotherapy. Australian Journal of Clinical Hypnotherapy and Hypnosis 22 (2):78-92.
  4. Sean M. Barnes, Steven Jay Lynn & Ronald J. Pekala (2009). Not All Group Hypnotic Suggestibility Scales Are Created Equal: Individual Differences in Behavioral and Subjective Responses☆. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):255-265.
    To examine the influence of hypnotic suggestibility testing as a source of individual differences in hypnotic responsiveness, we compared behavioral and subjective responses on three scales of hypnotic suggestibility: The Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A . Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility. Berlin: Consulting Psychologists Press); the Carleton University Responsiveness to Suggestion Scale . The Carleton University Responsiveness to Suggestion Scale: Normative data and psychometric properties. Psychological Reports, 53, 523–535); and the Group Scale of Hypnotic Ability . (...)
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  5. Imants Baruss (2003). Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association.
  6. Imants Baruss (2003). Hypnosis. In Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association 107-133.
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  7. Tim Bayne (2007). Hypnosis and the Unity of Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 93-109.
    Hypnosis appears to generate unusual—and sometimes even astonishing—changes in the contents of consciousness. Hypnotic subjects report perceiving things that are not there, they report not perceiving things that are there, and they report unusual alterations in the phenomenology of agency. In addition to apparent alterations in the contents of consciousness, hypnosis also appears to involve alterations in the structure of consciousness. According to many theorists—most notably Hilgard—hypnosis demonstrates that the unity of consciousness is an illusion (Hilgard 1977).
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  8. Tim Bayne (2007). Hypnosis and the Unity of Consciousness. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press
    Hypnosis appears to generate unusual—and sometimes even astonishing—changes in the contents of consciousness. Hypnotic subjects report perceiving things that are not there, they report not perceiving things that are there, and they report unusual alterations in the phenomenology of agency. In addition to apparent alterations in the contents of consciousness, hypnosis also appears to involve alterations in the structure of consciousness. According to many theorists—most notably Hilgard—hypnosis demonstrates that the unity of consciousness is an illusion (Hilgard 1977).
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  9. J. O. Beahrs (1983). Co-Consciousness: A Common Denominator in Hypnosis, Multiple Personality, and Normalcy. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis 26:100-13.
  10. J. O. Beahrs (1982). Unity and Multiplicity: Multilevel Consciousness of Self in Hypnosis, Psychiatric Disorder, and Mental Health. Brunner/Mazel.
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  11. D. G. Benner & C. Stephen Evans (1984). Unity and Multiplicity in Hypnosis, Commissurotomy, and Multiple Personality Disorder. Journal of Mind and Behavior 5 (4):423-431.
  12. Alfred Binet (1884). Visual Hallucinations in Hypnotism. Mind 9 (35):413-415.
  13. Ned Block (2002). Behaviorism Revisited. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):977-978.
    O'Regan and Noe declare that the qualitative character of experience is constituted by the nature of the sensorimotor contingencies at play when we perceive. Sensorimotor contingencies are a highly restricted set of input-output relations. The restriction excludes contingencies that don’t essentially involve perceptual systems. Of course if the ‘sensory’ in ‘sensorimotor’ were to be understood mentalistically, the thesis would not be of much interest, so I assume that these contingencies are to be understood non-mentalistically. Contrary to their view, experience is (...)
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  14. Mélanie Boly, Marie-Elisabeth Faymonville, Brent A. Vogt, Pierre Maquet & Steven Laureys (2007). Hypnotic Regulation of Consciousness and the Pain Neuromatrix. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 15-27.
  15. Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen (2005). Simulating the Unconscious. Psychoanalysis and History 7 (1):5-20.
  16. K. Bowers (1992). Dissociated Control and the Limits of Hypnotic Responsiveness. Consciousness and Cognition 1 (1):32-39.
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  17. Scott Brewster, Alien Induction: Hypnosis, Writing, Authority.
    From Descartes onwards, modernity has proposed various categories and theoretical models – mental illness, the unconscious, ideology - to characterize an outside force capable of depriving the punctual, self-present subject of rational autonomy. Hypnotic trance constitutes another foreign body or agency that can take possession of the self-possessed Cartesian subject. Inhabiting the blind spot of reason and reflection, the hypnotic relation remains alien to the Cogito of psychoanalysis, a mysterious challenge to its authority. This essay explores the relationship between hypnosis, (...)
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  18. William Brown (1931). Hypnotism and Suggestion. Philosophy 6 (22):212 - 220.
    In any consideration of the nature of suggestion we cannot omit reference to the extraordinary and startling phenomena which may sometimes be observed in hypnotized subjects. But it would be a mistake to look upon hypnosis as something uncanny, mysterious, and occult. Although we have even yet no thoroughly satisfactory theory of hypnosis, we understand it in general terms, and can bring it into line with other facts and phenomena of psychology known in everyday life. The hypnotic subject, and the (...)
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  19. Richard A. Bryant & David Mallard (2003). Seeing is Believing: The Reality of Hypnotic Hallucinations. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):219-230.
    Two experiments investigated the reality attributed to hypnotic suggestion through subtle projection of a visual image during simultaneous suggestion for a visual hallucination that resembled the projected image. In Experiment 1, high and low hypnotizable participants were administered either a hypnotic induction or wake instructions, given a suggestion to hallucinate a shape, and then the projected image was subsequently introduced. Although highs in both conditions rated the projected image more vividly than lows, highs in the hypnosis condition made comparable reality (...)
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  20. Adrian Burgess (2007). On the Contribution of Neurophysiology to Hypnosis Research: Current State and Future Directions. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 195-219.
  21. M. C. & W. P. (2003). Hypnotic Control of Attention in the Stroop Task: A Historical Footnote. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):347-353.
    have recently provided a compelling demonstration of enhanced attentional control under post-hypnotic suggestion. Using the classic color-word interference paradigm, in which the task is to ignore a word and to name the color in which it is printed (e.g., RED in green, say ''green''), they gave a post-hypnotic instruction to participants that they would be unable to read. This eliminated Stroop interference in high suggestibility participants but did not alter interference in low suggestibility participants. replicated this pattern and further demonstrated (...)
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  22. J. A. Cheyne, S. D. Rueffer & I. R. Newby-Clark (1999). Hypnagogic and Hypnopompic Hallucinations During Sleep Paralysis: Neurological and Cultural Construction of the Night-Mare. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (3):319-337.
    Hypnagogic and hypnopompic experiences (HHEs) accompanying sleep paralysis (SP) are often cited as sources of accounts of supernatural nocturnal assaults and paranormal experiences. Descriptions of such experiences are remarkably consistent across time and cultures and consistent also with known mechanisms of REM states. A three-factor structural model of HHEs based on their relations both to cultural narratives and REM neurophysiology is developed and tested with several large samples. One factor, labeled Intruder, consisting of sensed presence, fear, and auditory and visual (...)
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  23. Axel Cleeremans & Erik Myin (1999). A Short Review of Consciousness in Action by Susan Hurley. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:455-458.
    Consider Susan Hurley's depiction of mainstream views of the mind: "The mind is a kind of sandwich, and cognition is the filling" (p. 401). This particular sandwich (with perception as the bottom loaf and action as the top loaf) tastes foul to Hurley, who devotes most of "Consciousness in Action" to a systematic and sometimes extraordinarily detailed critique of what has otherwise been dubbed "classical" models of the mind. This critique then provides the basis for her alternative proposal, in which (...)
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  24. Alvin David, Mark Moore & Dan Rusu (2002). Unconscious Information Processing, Hypnotic Amnesia, and the Misattribution of Arousal: Schachter and Singer's Theory Revised. Journal of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies 2 (1):23-33.
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  25. Vilfredo De Pascalis (2007). Phase-Ordered Gamma Oscillations and the Modulation of Hypnotic Experience. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 67-89.
  26. Zoltán Dienes, Elizabeth Brown, Sam Hutton, Irving Kirsch, Giuliana Mazzoni & Daniel B. Wright (2009). Hypnotic Suggestibility, Cognitive Inhibition, and Dissociation. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):837-847.
    We examined two potential correlates of hypnotic suggestibility: dissociation and cognitive inhibition. Dissociation is the foundation of two of the major theories of hypnosis and other theories commonly postulate that hypnotic responding is a result of attentional abilities . Participants were administered the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C. Under the guise of an unrelated study, 180 of these participants also completed: a version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale that is normally distributed in non-clinical populations; a latent inhibition (...)
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  27. Zoltán Dienes & Josef Perner (2007). Executive Control Without Conscious Awareness: The Cold Control Theory of Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 293-314.
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  28. Richard Double (1989). Puppeteers, Hypnotists, and Neurosurgeons. Philosophical Studies 56 (June):163-73.
    The objection to R-S accounts that was raised by the possibility of external agents requires the acceptance of two premises, viz., that all R-S accounts allow for puppeteers and that puppeteers necessarily make us unfree. The Metaphilosophical reply shows that to the extent that puppeteers are more problematic than determinism per se, pup-peteers may be explicitly excluded since they violate our paradigm of free will. The Metaphilosophical reply also suggests that we should not expect our mature R-S account to supply (...)
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  29. Tobias Egner & Amir Raz (2007). Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 29-50.
  30. O. Fassler, S. Lynn & J. Knox (2008). Is Hypnotic Suggestibility a Stable Trait?☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):240-253.
    The present study examined the trait-like nature of hypnotic suggestibility by examining the stability of hypnotic responsiveness in a test–retest design in which the procedures were administered either live or by audiotape. Contrary to the idea that hypnotizability is a largely immutable, stable trait, scores on the scale of hypnotic responsiveness decreased significantly at the second session. Measures of subjective experiences and expectancies accounted for a sizable portion of the variance in hypnotic responding, both at initial test and at retest. (...)
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  31. Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). HYPNOSIS INDUCES A CHANGED COMPOSITION OF BRAIN OSCILLATIONS IN EEG: A CASE STUDY. Contemporary Hypnosis 24 (1):3-18.
    Cognitive functions associated with the frontal lobes of the brain may be specifi cally involved in hypnosis. Thus, the frontal area of the brain has recently been of great interest when searching for neural changes associated with hypnosis. We tested the hypothesis that EEG during pure hypnosis would differ from the normal non-hypnotic EEG especially above the frontal area of the brain. The composition of brain oscillations was examined in a broad frequency band (130 Hz) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) of (...)
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  32. Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). Cortex Functional Connectivity as a Neurophysiological Correlate of Hypnosis: An EEG Case Study. Neuropsychologia 45 (7):14521462.
    Cortex functional connectivity associated with hypnosis was investigated in a single highly hypnotizable subject in a normal baseline condition and under neutral hypnosis during two sessions separated by a year. After the hypnotic induction, but without further suggestions as compared to the baseline condition, all studied parameters of local and remote functional connectivity were significantly changed. The significant differences between hypnosis and the baseline condition were observable (to different extent) in five studied independent frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and (...)
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  33. Shaun Gallagher (2005). Review of Alva Noë's Action in Perception. [REVIEW] Times Literary Supplement.
    In Action in Perception, Alva Noë provides a persuasive account of the “enactive” approach to perception, according to which perception is not simply based on the processing of sensory information, or on the construction of internal representations, but is fundamentally shaped by the motor possibilities of the perceiving body. As John Dewey put it in 1896, in his essay, “The Reflex Arc Concept in Psychology”.
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  34. Balaganesh Gandhi & David A. Oakley (2005). Does 'Hypnosis' by Any Other Name Smell as Sweet? The Efficacy of 'Hypnotic' Inductions Depends on the Label 'Hypnosis'. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):304-315.
    Hypnosis is associated with profound changes in conscious experience and is increasingly used as a cognitive tool to explore neuropsychological processes. Studies of this sort typically employ suggestions following a hypnotic induction to produce changes in perceptual experience and motor control. It is not clear, however, to what extent the induction procedure serves to facilitate suggested phenomena. This study investigated the effect on suggestibility of a hypnotic induction and labelling that procedure ‘hypnosis.’ Suggestibility of participants was tested before and after (...)
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  35. John Gruzelier (2005). Altered States of Consciousness and Hypnosis in the Twenty-First Century: Comment. Contemporary Hypnosis 22 (1):1-7.
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  36. Edmund Gurney (1887). Further Problems of Hypnotism (I.). Mind 12 (46):212-232.
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  37. Edmund Gurney (1887). Further Problems of Hypnotism (II.). Mind 12 (47):397-422.
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  38. Edmund Gurney (1884). The Problems of Hypnotism. Mind 9 (36):477-508.
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  39. Edmund Gurney (1884). The Stages of Hypnotism. Mind 9 (33):110-121.
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  40. Mary Haight (1989). Hypnosis and the Philosophy of Mind. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 90:171 - 189.
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  41. G. Stanley Hall (1883). Reaction-Time and Attention in the Hypnotic State. Mind 8 (30):170-182.
  42. G. Stanley Hall (1881). Recent Researches on Hypnotism. Mind 6 (21):98-104.
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  43. Graham A. Jamieson & Hasegawa & Harutomo (2007). New Paradigms of Hypnosis Research. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. OUP Oxford
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  44. Ernest R. Hilgard (1992). Divided Consciousness and Dissociation. Consciousness and Cognition 1 (1):16-31.
    The well-known behaviorist revolt against consciousness is largely in the past, although that does not mean that the new interest in consciousness is without many unsolved problems. Cognitive psychology, as an alternative, is not necessarily a consciousness psychology, and humanistic psychology, friendly to consciousness, has difficulty in maintaining scientific status. One approach to consciousness is by way of dissociation, the phenomena of which can be found in everyday experience but can be studied in more detail through hypnosis. One aspect of (...)
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  45. Ernest R. Hilgard (1979). Consciousness and Control: Lessons From Hypnosis. Australian Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis 7:103-15.
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  46. Susan L. Hurley (2007). Neural Dominance, Neural Deference, and Sensorimotor Dynamics. In M. Velmans (ed.), Encyclopedia of Consciousness. Blackwell 640--656.
    Why is neural activity in a particular area expressed as experience of red rather than green, or as visual experience rather than auditory? Indeed, why does it have any conscious expression at all? These familiar questions indicate the explanatory gap between neural activity and ‘what it’s like’-- qualities of conscious experience. The comparative explanatory gaps, intermodal and intramodal, can be separated from the absolute explanatory gap and associated zombie issues--why does neural activity have any conscious expression at all?. Here I (...)
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  47. Graham A. Iamieson & Harutomo Hasegavva (2007). New Paradigms of Hypnosis Research. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 133.
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  48. Cristina Iani, Federico Ricci, Giulia Baroni & Sandro Rubichi (2009). Attention Control and Susceptibility to Hypnosis. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):856-863.
    The present work aimed at assessing whether the interference exerted by task-irrelevant spatial information is comparable in high- and low-susceptible individuals and whether it may be eliminated by means of a specific posthypnotic suggestion. To this purpose high- and low-susceptible participants were tested using a Simon-like interference task after the administration of a suggestion aimed at preventing the processing of the irrelevant spatial information conveyed by the stimuli. The suggestion could be administered either in the absence or following a standard (...)
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  49. Graham A. Jamieson (2007). Previews and Prospects for the Cognitive Neuroscience of Hypnosis and Conscious States. In Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 1-11.
  50. Graham A. Jamieson (ed.) (2007). Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.
    The phenomenon of hypnosis provides a rich paradigm for those seeking to understand the processes that underlie consciousness. Understanding hypnosis tells us about a basic human capacity for altered experiences that is often overlooked in contemporary western societies. Throughout the 200 year history of psychology, hypnosis has been a major topic of investigation by some of the leading experimenters and theorists of each generation. Today hypnosis is emerging again as a lively area of research within cognitive (systems level) neuroscience informing (...)
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