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  1. Andrew Apter (1992). Depersonalization, the Experience of Prosthesis, and Our Cosmic Insignificance: The Experimental Phenomenology of an Altered State. Philosophical Psychology 5 (3):257-285.
    Psychogenic depersonalization is an altered mental state consisting of an unusual discontinuity in the phenomenological perception of personal being; the individual is engulfed by feelings of unreality, self-detachment and unfamiliarity in which the self is felt to lack subjective perspective and the intuitive feeling of personal embodiment. A new sub-feature of depersonalization is delineated. 'Prosthesis' consists in the thought that the thinker is a 'mere thing'. It is a subjectively realized sense of the specific and objective 'thingness' of the particular (...)
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  2. Heather Ashton (2002). Delirium and Hallucinations. In Elaine Perry, Heather Ashton & Allan Young (eds.), Neurochemistry of Consciousness: Neurotransmitters in Mind. John Benjamins 181-203.
  3. Imants Baruss (2003). Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association.
  4. Imants Barušs (2003). Death. In Imants Baruss (ed.), Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association 211-232.
  5. Imants Barušs (2003). Introduction. In Imants Baruss (ed.), Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association 3-23.
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  6. Imants Baruss (2003). Trance. In Mind. American Psychological Association 135-159.
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  7. R. P. Behrendt (2003). Hallucinations: Synchronisation of Thalamocortical ? Oscillations Underconstrained by Sensory Input. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):413-451.
    What we perceive is the product of an intrinsic process and not part of external physical reality. This notion is consistent with the philosophical position of transcendental idealism but also agrees with physiological findings on the thalamocortical system. -Frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in thalamocortical networks, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent oscillations under constraints of sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. Perception and conscious experience may be based (...)
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  8. Olaf Blanke & Christine Mohr (2005). Out-of-Body Experience, Heautoscopy, and Autoscopic Hallucination of Neurological Origin. Implications for Neurocognitive Mechanisms of Corporeal Awareness and Self Consciousness. Brain Research Reviews 50 (1):184-199.
  9. William Braud (2003). Nonordinary and Transcendent Experiences: Transpersonal Aspects of Consciousness. Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research 97 (1):1-26.
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  10. P. V. Bundzen, V. V. Zagrantsev, K. G. Korotkov, P. Leisner & L. -E. Unestahl (2000). Comprehsnive Bioelectrographic Analysis of Mechanisms of the Alternative State of Consciousness. Human Physiology 26 (5):558-566.
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  11. S. Bünning & Olaf Blanke (2006). The Out-of-Body Experience: Precipitation Factors and Neural Correlates. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier
  12. E. Cardena & S. Lynn (eds.) (2000). Varieties of Anomalous Experience: Examining the Scientific Evidence. American Psychological Association.
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  13. Glenn Carruthers (2015). Who Am I in Out of Body Experiences? Implications From OBEs for the Explanandum of a Theory of Self-Consciousness. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):183-197.
    Contemporary theories of self-consciousness typically begin by dividing experiences of the self into types, each requiring separate explanation. The stereotypical case of an out of body experience may be seen to suggest a distinction between the sense of oneself as an experiencing subject, a mental entity, and a sense of oneself as an embodied person, a bodily entity. Point of view, in the sense of the place from which the subject seems to experience the world, in this case is tied (...)
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  14. A. Dietrich (2003). Functional Neuroanatomy of Altered States of Consciousness: The Transient Hypofrontality Hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):231-256.
    It is the central hypothesis of this paper that the mental states commonly referred to as altered states of consciousness are principally due to transient prefrontal cortex deregulation. Supportive evidence from psychological and neuroscientific studies of dreaming, endurance running, meditation, daydreaming, hypnosis, and various drug-induced states is presented and integrated. It is proposed that transient hypofrontality is the unifying feature of all altered states and that the phenomenological uniqueness of each state is the result of the differential viability of various (...)
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  15. Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). HYPNOSIS INDUCES A CHANGED COMPOSITION OF BRAIN OSCILLATIONS IN EEG: A CASE STUDY. Contemporary Hypnosis 24 (1):3-18.
    Cognitive functions associated with the frontal lobes of the brain may be specifi cally involved in hypnosis. Thus, the frontal area of the brain has recently been of great interest when searching for neural changes associated with hypnosis. We tested the hypothesis that EEG during pure hypnosis would differ from the normal non-hypnotic EEG especially above the frontal area of the brain. The composition of brain oscillations was examined in a broad frequency band (130 Hz) in the electroencephalogram (EEG) of (...)
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  16. Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo (2007). Cortex Functional Connectivity as a Neurophysiological Correlate of Hypnosis: An EEG Case Study. Neuropsychologia 45 (7):14521462.
    Cortex functional connectivity associated with hypnosis was investigated in a single highly hypnotizable subject in a normal baseline condition and under neutral hypnosis during two sessions separated by a year. After the hypnotic induction, but without further suggestions as compared to the baseline condition, all studied parameters of local and remote functional connectivity were significantly changed. The significant differences between hypnosis and the baseline condition were observable (to different extent) in five studied independent frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta, and (...)
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  17. Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Tarja Kallio-Tamminen (2015). EEG-Guided Meditation: A Personalized Approach. Journal of Physiology-Paris:in press.
    The therapeutic potential of meditation for physical and mental well-being is well documented, however the possibility of adverse effects warrants further discussion of the suitability of any particular meditation practice for every given participant. This concern highlights the need for a personalized approach in the meditation practice adjusted for a concrete individual. This can be done by using an objective screening procedure that detects the weak and strong cognitive skills in brain function, thus helping design a tailored meditation training protocol. (...)
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  18. R. Forman (ed.) (1990). The Problem of Pure Consciousness: Mysticism and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Are mystical experiences primarily formed by the mystic's cultural background and concepts, as modern day "constructivists" maintain, or do mystics in some way transcend language, belief, and culturally conditioned expectations? Do mystical experiences differ in the different religious traditions, as "pluralists" contend, or are they identical across cultures? Twelve contributors here attempt to answer these questions through close examination of a particular form of mystical experience, "Pure Consciousness"--the experience of being awake but devoid of intentional content for consciousness. The contributors (...)
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  19. E. B. Gurstelle & J. L. de Oliveira (2004). Daytime Parahypnagogia: A State of Consciousness That Occurs When We Almost Fall Asleep. Medical Hypotheses 62:166-8.
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  20. R. Edward Hogan & Kitti Kaiboriboon (2003). The "Dreamy State": John Hughlings-Jackson's Ideas of Epilepsy and Consciousness. American Journal of Psychiatry 160 (10):1740-1747.
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  21. Claire M. Karam (2003). Rethinking Dissociation As an Altered State of Consciousness: An Exploration of Altered State Encounters in Imaginal Space and Beyond. Dissertation, Pacifica Graduate Institute
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  22. J. M. Katz (1983). Altered States of Consciousness and Emotion. Imagination, Cognition and Personality 2:37-50.
  23. Dagmar Koethe, Christoph W. Gerth, Miriam A. Neatby, Anita Haensel, Martin Thies, Udo Schneider, Hinderk M. Emrich, Joachim Klosterkötter, Frauke Schultze-Lutter & F. Markus Leweke (2006). Disturbances of Visual Information Processing in Early States of Psychosis and Experimental Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Altered States of Consciousness. Schizophrenia Research 88 (1-3):142-150.
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  24. Errol R. Korn (2002). Visualization Techniques and Altered States of Consciousness. In Anees A. Sheikh (ed.), Handbook of Therapeutic Imagery Techniques. Baywood Publishing Co. 41-49.
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  25. Steven Laureys (2006). The Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology. Elsevier.
    The interest of this is threefold. First, patients with altered states of consciousness continue to represent a major clinical problem in terms of clinical assessment of consciousness and daily management.
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  26. Andrew B. Newberg & Eugene G. D'Aquili (2000). The Neuropsychology of Religious and Spiritual Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):251-266.
    This paper considers the neuropsychology of religious and spiritual experiences. This requires a review of our current understanding of brain function as well as an integrated synthesis to derive a neuropsychological model of spiritual experiences. Religious and spiritual experiences are highly complex states that likely involve many brain structures including those involved in higher order processing of sensory and cognitive input as well as those involved in the elaboration of emotions and autonomic responses. Such an analysis can help elucidate the (...)
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  27. Sanford I. Nidich, Randi J. Nidich & Charles N. Alexander (2000). Moral Development and Higher States of Consciousness. Journal of Adult Development. Special Issue 1949 (4):217-225.
  28. Gregory Nixon (2004). Shanon's *The Antipodes of the Mind*. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (5/6).
    What happens when a worldly Israeli cognitive psychologist goes to the Amazon Basin where he ingests the famed psychotropic concoction Ayahuasca (the ‘vine of the dead’) again and again and again? Our intrepid philosophical psychologist is no longer a sprightly youth, maddened for adventure. He is instead an accomplished theoretician with widely published articles (several in this journal) and a noted book (Shanon, 1993) that speak the from the perspective of cognitive (or phenomenological, for Shanon) psychology against the reductive tendency (...)
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  29. Ronald J. Pekala & E. Cardena (2000). Methodological Issues in the Study of Altered States of Consciousness and Anomalous Experiences. In E. Cardena & S. Lynn (eds.), Varieties of Anomalous Experience: Examining the Scientific Evidence. American Psychological Association
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  30. Elaine Perry, Heather Ashton & Andrew W. Young (eds.) (2002). Neurochemistry of Consciousness: Neurotransmitters in Mind. John Benjamins.
  31. Nathan Porath (2013). “Not to Be Aware Anymore”: Indigenous Sumatran Ideas and Shamanic Experiences of Changed States of Awareness/Consciousness. Anthropology of Consciousness 24 (1):7-31.
    Anthropologists working on altered states of consciousness (ASC) have suggested that we should do away with psychologizing concepts and use people's own terms for these experiences. With material drawn from the Orang Sakai of Sumatra this paper shows that practitioners who utilize ASC do recognize the alteration of states of awareness as preconditions for numinous interactions. Also critically discussed is the term ASC.
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  32. M. A. Richards, S. A. Koren & M. A. Persinger (2002). Circumcerebral Application of Weak Complex Magnetic Fields with Derivatives and Changes in Electroencephalographic Power Spectra Within the Theta Range: Implications for States of Consciousness. Perceptual and Motor Skills 95 (2):671-686.
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  33. Anees A. Sheikh (ed.) (2002). Handbook of Therapeutic Imagery Techniques. Baywood Publishing Co..
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  34. Marlene Spencer (2001). An Exploratory Study in Altered Consciousness and Auditory Memory in Critically Ill Patients. Dissertation, University of Alberta
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  35. Louis Tinnin (1990). Mental Unity, Altered States of Consciousness, and Dissociation. Dissociation 3:154-59.
  36. Dieter Vaitl, Niels Birbaumer, John Gruzelier, Graham A. Jamieson, Boris Kotchoubey, Andrea Kübler, Dietrich Lehmann, Wolfgang H. R. Miltner, Ulrich Ott, Peter Pütz, Gebhard Sammer, Inge Strauch, Ute Strehl, Jiri Wackermann & Thomas Weiss (2005). Psychobiology of Altered States of Consciousness. Psychological Bulletin 131 (1):98-127.
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  37. Dieter Vaitl & Ulrich Ott (2005). Altered States of Consciousness Induced by Psychophysiological Techniques. Mind and Matter 3 (1):9-30.
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  38. Jirí Wackerman, Peter Pütz, Simone Büchi, Inge Strauch & Dietrich Lehmann (2002). Brain Electrical Activity and Subjective Experience During Altered States of Consciousness: Ganzfeld and Hypnagogic States. International Journal of Psychophysiology 46 (2):123-146.
  39. Dennis R. Wier (ed.) (2007). The Way of Trance. Trance Research Foundation.
    Introduction TRANCE began to interest me when, in 1957, a friend and I went to see a hypnotist so that I could learn to hypnotize him. ...
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