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  1. S. G. Arnal (2001). Gordon Graham The Internet://A Philosophical Inquiry. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):311-311.
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  2. Christopher Banthin, Douglas Blanke & John Archard (2004). Legal Approaches to Regulating Internet Tobacco Sales. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (s4):64-68.
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  3. Anat Biletzki (2013). Online Security: What's in a Name? [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):397-410.
    This article motions to a real contradiction between online security and civil rights. It traverses semantic and conceptual elaborations of both security and human rights, narrowing their range to national security and human rather than civil rights, and suggests that the concept of security itself, whether online or not, is a rhetorical instrument in the hands of interested parties, mostly states and militaries. This instrument is used to undermine human rights precisely by means of its association and even identification with (...)
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  4. Pamela Bluh (2006). "Open Access," Legal Publishing, and Online Repositories. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (1):126-130.
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  5. Elizabeth Buchanan (2006). Introduction: Internet Research Ethics at a Critical Juncture. Journal of Information Ethics 15 (2):14-17.
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  6. Ian Budge (1996). Bytes That Bite: The Internet and Deliberative Democracy. Constellations 4 (2):248-263.
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  7. Teresa Blankmeyer Burke (2012). A Disability Response to Surrogate Decision Making in the Internet Age. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):36-37.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 36-37, October 2012.
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  8. Mei-Fang Chen & Ya-Hui Yen (2011). Costs and Utilities Perspective of Consumers' Intentions to Engage in Online Music Sharing: Consumers' Knowledge Matters. Ethics and Behavior 21 (4):283 - 300.
    Online music sharing, deemed illegal for invading intellectual property rights under current laws, has become a crucial issue for the music industry in the modern digital age, but few have investigated the potential costs and utilities for individuals involved in such online misbehavior. This study aimed to fill in this gap to predict consumers' intentions to engage in online music sharing and further consider consumers' online music sharing knowledge as a moderator in the research model. The results of repeated measures (...)
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  9. Craig A. Childress & Joy K. Asamen (1998). The Emerging Relationship of Psychology and the Internet: Proposed Guidelines for Conducting Internet Intervention Research. Ethics and Behavior 8 (1):19 – 35.
    The Internet is rapidly developing into an important medium of communication in modem society, and both psychological research and therapeutic interventions are being increasingly conducted using this new communication medium. As therapeutic interventions using the Internet are becoming more prevalent, it is becoming increasingly important to conduct research on psychotherapeutic Internet interventions to assist in the development of an appropriate standard of practice regarding interventions using this new medium. In this article, we examine the Internet and the current psychological uses (...)
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  10. M. Clarke (2009). Ethics of Science Communication on the Web. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 9:9-12.
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  11. David Coady (2011). An Epistemic Defence of the Blogosphere. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):277-294.
    Alvin Goldman claims that the conventional media is in decline as a result of competition from the blogosphere, and that this is a threat to our epistemic wellbeing and, as a result, a threat to good democratic decision-making. He supports this claim with three common complaints about the blogosphere: first, that it is undermining professional journalism, second, that, unlike the conventional media, it lacks ‘balance’, and finally that it is a parasite on the conventional media. I defend the blogosphere against (...)
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  12. Raphael Cohen-Almagor (2012). Freedom of Expression, Internet Responsibility, and Business Ethics: The Yahoo! Saga and Its Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):353-365.
    In the late 1990s, the Internet seemed a perfect medium for business: a facilitator of unlimited economical propositions to people without any regulatory limitations. Cases such as that of Yahoo! mark the beginning of the end of that illusion. They demonstrate that Internet service providers (ISPs) have to respect domestic state legislation in order to avoid legal risks. Yahoo! was wrong to ignore French national laws and the plea to remove Nazi memorabilia from its auction site. Its legal struggle proved (...)
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  13. Paul B. de Laat (2001). Emerging Roles for Third Parties in Cyberspace. Ethics and Information Technology 3 (4):267-276.
    In `real' space, third partieshave always been useful to facilitatetransactions. With cyberspace opening up, it isto be expected that intermediation will alsodevelop in a virtual fashion. The articlefocuses upon new cyberroles for third partiesthat seem to announce themselves clearly.First, virtualization of the market place haspaved the way for `cybermediaries', who brokerbetween supply and demand of material andinformational goods. Secondly,cybercommunication has created newuncertainties concerning informational securityand privacy. Also, as in real space,transacting supposes some decency with one'spartners. These needs are being addressed (...)
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  14. Jodi Dean (2003). Why the Net is Not a Public Sphere. Constellations 10 (1):95-112.
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  15. Adam Dodek (2010). Ethics in Practice Correspondents' Reports Canada: Sex on the Internet and Fitness for Judicial Office. Legal Ethics 13 (2):215.
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  16. Anders Eriksson & Kalle Grill, Who Owns My Avatar? -Rights in Virtual Property. Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views – Worlds in Play.
    This paper presents a framework for discussing issues of ownership in connection to virtual worlds. We explore how divergent interests in virtual property can be mediated by applying a constructivist perspective to the concept ownership. The simple solutions offered today entail that a contract between the game producer and the gamer gives the game developer exclusive rights to all virtual property. This appears to be unsatisfactory. A number of legitimate interests on part of both producers and gamers may be readily (...)
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  17. Karen Frost-Arnold (2014). Trustworthiness and Truth: The Epistemic Pitfalls of Internet Accountability. Episteme 11 (1):63-81.
    Since anonymous agents can spread misinformation with impunity, many people advocate for greater accountability for internet speech. This paper provides a veritistic argument that accountability mechanisms can cause significant epistemic problems for internet encyclopedias and social media communities. I show that accountability mechanisms can undermine both the dissemination of true beliefs and the detection of error. Drawing on social psychology and behavioral economics, I suggest alternative mechanisms for increasing the trustworthiness of internet communication.
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  18. Joseph S. Fulda, The Worst Way (Not) to Communicate.
    Evaluates e-mail critically from four perspectives. Note: This is /not/ the full version. The full version is available upon written request only.
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  19. Joseph S. Fulda (2000). A Gift of Fire: Social Legal, and Ethical Issues in Computing by Sara Baase. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 2 (4):241-247.
    Extremely favorable review, with hardly any criticisms at all.
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  20. Justin L. Harmon (forthcoming). Dwelling In the House That Porn Built: A Phenomenological Critique of Pornography In the Age of Internet Technology. Social Philosophy Today.
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  21. Heidi E. Keller & Sandra Lee (2003). Ethical Issues Surrounding Human Participants Research Using the Internet. Ethics and Behavior 13 (3):211 – 219.
    The Internet appears to offer psychologists doing research unrestricted access to infinite amounts and types of data. However, the ethical issues surrounding the use of data and data collection methods are challenging research review boards at many institutions. This article illuminates some of the obstacles facing researchers who wish to take advantage of the Internet's flexibility. The applications of the APA ethical codes for conducting research on human participants on the Internet are reviewed. The principle of beneficence, as well as (...)
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  22. Cathy Legg (2005). Hacking: The Performance of Technology? [REVIEW] Techne 9 (2):151-154.
    The word “hacker” has an interesting double meaning: one vastly more widespread connotation of technological mischief, even criminality, and an original meaning amongst the tech savvy as a term of highest approbation. Both meanings, however, share the idea that hackers possess a superior ability to manipulate technology according to their will (and, as with God, this superior ability to exercise will is a source of both mystifying admiration and fear). This book mainly concerns itself with the former meaning. To Thomas (...)
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  23. Michael C. Loui (2002). Duncan Langford. Internet Ethics. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (2):167-168.
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  24. Bjørn K. Myskja (2008). The Categorical Imperative and the Ethics of Trust. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (4):213-220.
    Trust can be understood as a precondition for a well-functioning society or as a way to handle complexities of living in a risk society, but also as a fundamental aspect of human morality. Interactions on the Internet pose some new challenges to issues of trust, especially connected to disembodiedness. Mistrust may be an important obstacle to Internet use, which is problematic as the Internet becomes a significant arena for political, social and commercial activities necessary for full participation in a liberal (...)
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  25. Michael R. Nelson (2010). A Response to Responsibility of and Trust in ISPs by Raphael Cohen-Almagor. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):403-407.
    The Internet and Internet applications such as cloud computing continue to grow at an extraordinary rate, enabled by the Internet's open architecture and the vibrant lightly regulated Internet service provider (ISP) market. Proposals to hold ISPs responsible for content and software shared by their customers would dramatically constrain the openness and innovation that has been the hallmark of the Internet to date. Rather than taking the kind of approach favored by Raphael Cohen-Almagor, government should enlist the assistance of other intermediaries (...)
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  26. Simon Newman & Wallace Koehler (2004). Copyright. Moral Rights, Fair Use, and the Online Environment. Journal of Information Ethics 13 (2):38-57.
  27. Mitch Parsell & Cynthia Townley, Refereed Articles.
    In response to those who have argued the Internet is amoral at best, and an instrument for immorality at worst, we show that the net can provide a forum for genuine ethical engagement and distinctive forms of wrongdoing. Without deriving the moral value of the Internet from its interface with the non-virtual world and in contrast to presentations of the net as an anarchic utopia or as an unethical or amoral dystopia, we apply a substantive moral test to a selection (...)
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  28. David J. Pittenger (2003). Internet Research: An Opportunity to Revisit Classic Ethical Problems in Behavioral Research. Ethics and Behavior 13 (1):45 – 60.
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  29. Saskia Polder-Verkiel (2012). Online Responsibility: Bad Samaritanism and the Influence of Internet Mediation. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):117-141.
    In 2008 a young man committed suicide while his webcam was running. 1,500 people apparently watched as the young man lay dying: when people finally made an effort to call the police, it was too late. This closely resembles the case of Kitty Genovese in 1964, where 39 neighbours supposedly watched an attacker assault and did not call until it was too late. This paper examines the role of internet mediation in cases where people may or may not have been (...)
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  30. Daniel Edward Shapiro & Charles Eric Schulman (1996). Ethical and Legal Issues in E-Mail Therapy. Ethics and Behavior 6 (2):107 – 124.
    Psychologists and psychiatrists recently started using electronic mail (e-mail) to conduct therapy. This article explores relevant ethical and legal issues including, among others, the nature of the professional relationship, boundaries of competence, informed consent, treating minors, confidentiality, and the duty to warn and protect. To illustrate these complex issues, two services currently operating are discussed. To address potential hazards to clients and the profession, a new ethical standard for e-mail therapists is offered.
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  31. Matteo Turilli, Antonino Vaccaro & Mariarosaria Taddeo (2012). Internet Neutrality: Ethical Issues in the Internet Environment. Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):133-151.
    This paper investigates the ethical issues surrounding the concept of Internet neutrality focusing specifically on the correlation between neutrality and fairness. Moving from an analysis of the many available definitions of Internet neutrality and the heterogeneity of the Internet infrastructure, the common assumption that a neutral Internet is also a fair Internet is challenged. It is argued that a properly neutral Internet supports undesirable situations in which few users can exhaust the majority of the available resources or in which specific (...)
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  32. Connie K. Varnhagen, Matthew Gushta, Jason Daniels, Tara C. Peters, Neil Parmar, Danielle Law, Rachel Hirsch, Bonnie Sadler Takach & Tom Johnson (2005). How Informed is Online Informed Consent? Ethics and Behavior 15 (1):37 – 48.
    We examined participants' reading and recall of informed consent documents presented via paper or computer. Within each presentation medium, we presented the document as a continuous or paginated document to simulate common computer and paper presentation formats. Participants took slightly longer to read paginated and computer informed consent documents and recalled slightly more information from the paginated documents. We concluded that obtaining informed consent online is not substantially different than obtaining it via paper presentation. We also provide suggestions for improving (...)
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