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  1. added 2016-08-27
    A. C. Love (2011). Darwin’s Functional Reasoning and Homology. In M. Wheeler (ed.), 150 Years of Evolution: Darwin’s Impact on Contemporary Thought & Culture. SDSU Press 49–67.
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  2. added 2016-08-27
    A. C. Love (2007). Morphological and Paleontological Perspectives for a History of Evo-Devo. In M. Laubichler & J. Maienschein (eds.), From Embryology to Evo-Devo: A History of Developmental Evolution. MIT Press 267–307.
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  3. added 2016-08-26
    Jan Baedke & Tobias Schöttler (2016). Visual Metaphors in the Sciences: The Case of Epigenetic Landscape Images. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie:1-22.
    Recent philosophical analyses of the epistemic dimension of images in the sciences show a certain trend in acknowledging potential roles of these images beyond their merely decorative or pedagogical functions. We argue, however, that this new debate has yet paid little attention to a special type of pictures, we call ‘visual metaphor’, and its versatile heuristic potential in organizing data, supporting communication, and guiding research, modeling, and theory formation. Based on a case study of Conrad Hal Waddington’s epigenetic landscape images (...)
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  4. added 2016-08-26
    A. C. Love (2016). Explaining the Origins of Multicellularity: Between Evolutionary Dynamics and Developmental Mechanisms. In K. J. Niklas & S. A. Newman (eds.), Multicellularity: Origins and Evolution. MIT Press 279–295.
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  5. added 2016-08-26
    A. C. Love & D. Urban (2016). Developmental Evolution of Novel Structures – Animals. In R. Kliman (ed.), Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology. Volume 3. Academic Press 136–145.
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  6. added 2016-08-26
    A. C. Love (2015). Conceptual Change and Evolutionary Developmental Biology. In Conceptual Change in Biology: Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives on Evolution and Development: Boston Studies in Philosophy of Science. Springer 1-54.
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  7. added 2016-08-26
    A. C. Love, Developmental Biology. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  8. added 2016-08-26
    A. C. Love (2015). Evolutionary Developmental Biology: Philosophical Issues. In T. Heams, P. Huneman, L. Lecointre & M. Silberstein (eds.), Handbook of Evolutionary Thinking in the Sciences. Springer 265-283.
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  9. added 2016-08-26
    A. C. Love (2014). The Erotetic Organization of Developmental Biology. In A. Minelli & T. Pradeu (eds.), Towards a Theory of Development. Oxford University Press 33–55.
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  10. added 2016-08-26
    A. C. Love (2013). Teaching Evolutionary Developmental Biology: Concepts, Problems, and Controversy. In K. Kampourakis (ed.), Philosophy of Biology: A Companion for Educators. Springer 323-341.
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  11. added 2016-08-26
    A. C. Love (2010). Rethinking the Structure of Evolutionary Theory for an Extended Synthesis. In M. Pigliucci & G. Müller (eds.), Evolution—The Extended Synthesis. MIT Press 403–441.
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  12. added 2016-08-25
    A. P. Moczek, K. E. Sears, A. Stollewerk, P. J. Wittkopp, P. Diggle, I. Dworkin, C. Ledon-Rettig, D. Q. Mattus, S. Roth, E. Abouheif, F. D. Brown, C.-H. Chiu, C. S. Cohen, A. W. De Tomaso, S. F. Gilbert, B. K. Hall, A. C. Love, D. C. Lyons, T. Sanger, J. Smith, C. Specht, M. Vallejo-Marin & C. G. Extavour (2015). The Significance and Scope of Evolutionary Developmental Biology: A Vision for the 21st Century. Evolution & Development 17:198–219.
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  13. added 2016-08-25
    Alan C. Love (2013). Interdisciplinary Lessons for the Teaching of Biology From the Practice of Evo-Devo. Science & Education 22:255–278.
    Evolutionary developmental biology (Evo-devo) is a vibrant area of contemporary life science that should be (and is) increasingly incorporated into teaching curricula. Although the inclusion of this content is important for biological pedagogy at multiple levels of instruction, there are also philosophical lessons that can be drawn from the scientific practices found in Evo-devo. One feature of particular significance is the interdisciplinary nature of Evo-devo investigations and their resulting explanations. Instead of a single disciplinary approach being the most explanatory or (...)
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  14. added 2016-08-25
    Alan C. Love (2012). Hierarchy, Causation and Explanation: Ubiquity, Locality, and Pluralism. Interface Focus 2:115–125..
    The ubiquity of top-down causal explanations within and across the sciences is prima facie evidence for the existence of top-down causation. Much debate has been focused on whether top-down causation is coherent or in conflict with reductionism. Less attention has been given to the question of whether these representations of hierarchical relations pick out a single, common hierarchy. A negative answer to this question undermines a commonplace view that the world is divided into stratified ‘levels’ of organization and suggests that (...)
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  15. added 2016-08-25
    I. Brigandt & Alan C. Love (2010). Evolutionary Novelty and the Evo-Devo Synthesis: Field Notes. Evolutionary Biology 37:93–99.
    Accounting for the evolutionary origins of morphological novelty is one of the core challenges of contemporary evolutionary biology. A successful explanatory framework requires the integration of different biological disciplines, but the relationships between developmental biology and standard evolutionary biology remain contested. There is also disagreement about how to define the concept of evolutionary novelty. These issues were the subjects of a workshop held in November 2009 at the University of Alberta. We report on the discussion and results of this workshop, (...)
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  16. added 2016-08-25
    Alan C. Love (2010). Idealization in Evolutionary Developmental Investigation: A Tension Between Phenotypic Plasticity and Normal Stages. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 365:679–690.
    Idealization is a reasoning strategy that biologists use to describe, model and explain that purposefully departs from features known to be present in nature. Similar to other strategies of scientific reasoning, idealization combines distinctive strengths alongside of latent weaknesses. The study of ontogeny in model organisms is usually executed by establishing a set of normal stages for embryonic development, which enables researchers in different laboratory contexts to have standardized comparisons of experimental results. Normal stages are a form of idealization because (...)
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  17. added 2016-08-25
    A. C. Love (2010). Darwin’s ‘Imaginary Illustrations’: Creatively Teaching Evolutionary Concepts and the Nature of Science. The American Biology Teacher 72:82–89.
    An overlooked feature of Darwin’s work is his use of “imaginary illustrations” to show that natural selection is competent to produce adaptive, evolutionary change. When set in the context of Darwin’s methodology, these thought.
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  18. added 2016-08-25
    Alan C. Love (2009). Marine Invertebrates, Model Organisms, and the Modern Synthesis: Epistemic Values, Evo-Devo, and Exclusion. Theory in Biosciences 128:19–42.
    A central reason that undergirds the significance of evo-devo is the claim that development was left out of the Modern synthesis. This claim turns out to be quite complicated, both in terms of whether development was genuinely excluded and how to understand the different kinds of embryological research that might have contributed. The present paper reevaluates this central claim by focusing on the practice of model organism choice. Through a survey of examples utilized in the literature of the Modern synthesis, (...)
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  19. added 2016-08-25
    A. C. Love (2008). From Philosophy to Science (to Natural Philosophy): Evolutionary Developmental Perspectives. The Quarterly Review of Biology 83:65–76.
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  20. added 2016-08-24
    Ben Dixon (2016). Deriving Moral Considerability From Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac. Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):196-212.
    I argue that a reasonable understanding of Leopold’s ‘Land Ethic’ is one that identifies possession of health as being a sufficient condition for moral consideration. With this, Leopold extends morality not only to biotic wholes, but to individual organisms, as both can have their health undermined. My argument centers on explaining why Leopold thinks it reasonable to analogize ecosystems both to an organism and to a community: both have a health. My conclusions undermine J. Baird Callicott’s rhetorical dismissal of the (...)
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  21. added 2016-08-21
    Seungbae Park (forthcoming). Problems with Using Evolutionary Theory in Philosophy. Axiomathes.
    Does science move toward truths? Are present scientific theories (approximately) true? Should we invoke truths to explain the success of science? Do our cognitive faculties track truths? Some philosophers say yes, while others say no, to these questions. Interestingly, both groups use the same scientific theory, viz., evolutionary theory, to defend their positions. I argue that it begs the question for the former group to do so because their positive answers imply that evolutionary theory is warranted, whereas it is self-defeating (...)
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  22. added 2016-08-20
    Jose Luis Gonzalez Recio (2016). Los hechos y las hipótesis en la fisiología francesa del siglo XIX. Ludus Vitalis 45:101-126.
    The historiographical studies focused on French nineteenth-century physiology have eventually enshrined the thesis that the need to resort to hypotheses was assumed and proclaimed for the first time within the works and scientific practice of Claude Bernard (1813-1888). His teacher, François Magendie (1783-1855), is presented as a figure that fights against vitalism and that, devoted to an absolute empiricism, only admits the bare facts as constitutive elements of science. He accepted generalizations —as long as they were not premature— from what (...)
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  23. added 2016-08-18
    Baptiste Bedessem & Stphanie Ruphy (forthcoming). SMT and TOFT Integrable After All: A Reply to Bizzarri and Cucina. Acta Biotheoretica.
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  24. added 2016-08-18
    Alfred Gierer (1988). Physics, Life and Mind: The Scope and Limitations of Science. In Iain Paul Jan Fennema (ed.), Second European Conference on Science and Religion. Kluwer Academic Publishers 61-71.
    What, precisely, are the ‘changing perspectives on reality’ in contemporary scientific thought? The topics of the lecture are the scope and the limits of science with emphasis on the physical foundations of biology. The laws of physics in general and the physics of molecules in particular form the basis for explaining the mechanism of reproduction, the generation of structure and form in the course of the development of the individual organism, the evolution of the diversity and complexity of organisms by (...)
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  25. added 2016-08-16
    Charles T. Wolfe & Philippe Huneman (forthcoming). “Man-Machines and Embodiment: From Cartesian Physiology to Claude Bernard’s ‘Living Machine’”. In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), Embodiment, Oxford Philosophical Concepts. Oxford
    A common and enduring early modern intuition is that materialists reduce organisms in general and human beings in particular to automata. Wasn’t a famous book of the time entitled L’Homme-Machine? In fact, the machine is employed as an analogy, and there was a specifically materialist form of embodiment, in which the body is not reduced to an inanimate machine, but is conceived as an affective, flesh-and-blood entity. We discuss how mechanist and vitalist models of organism exist in a more complementary (...)
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  26. added 2016-08-16
    Charles T. Wolfe (2015). “Was Canguilhem a Biochauvinist? Goldstein, Canguilhem and the Project of ‘Biophilosophy’". In Darian Meacham (ed.), Medicine and Society, New Continental Perspectives (Dordrecht: Springer, Philosophy and Medicine Series, 2015). Springer 197-212.
    Canguilhem is known to have regretted, with some pathos, that Life no longer serves as an orienting question in our scientific activity. He also frequently insisted on a kind of uniqueness of organisms and/or living bodies – their inherent normativity, their value-production and overall their inherent difference from mere machines. In addition, Canguilhem acknowledged a major debt to the German neurologist-theoretician Kurt Goldstein, author most famously of The Structure of the Organism in 1934; along with Merleau-Ponty, Canguilhem was the main (...)
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  27. added 2016-08-14
    Kate E. Lynch (forthcoming). Heritability and Causal Reasoning. Biology and Philosophy:1-25.
    Gene–environment covariance is the phenomenon whereby genetic differences bias variation in developmental environment, and is particularly problematic for assigning genetic and environmental causation in a heritability analysis. The interpretation of these cases has differed amongst biologists and philosophers, leading some to reject the utility of heritability estimates altogether. This paper examines the factors that influence causal reasoning when G–E covariance is present, leading to interpretive disagreement between scholars. It argues that the causal intuitions elicited are influenced by concepts of agency (...)
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  28. added 2016-08-10
    Mark Couch (2012). Natural Kind. In Robert L. Fastiggi (ed.), New Catholic Encyclopedia Supplement 2012-13: Ethics and Philosophy. Gale
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  29. added 2016-08-09
    Robert K. Garcia & Jonathan A. Newman (2016). Is It Possible to Care for Ecosystems? Policy Paralysis and Ecosystem Management. Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):170-182.
    Conservationists have two types of arguments for why we should conserve ecosystems: instrumental and intrinsic value arguments. Instrumental arguments contend that we ought to conserve ecosystems because of the benefits that humans, or other morally relevant individuals, derive from ecosystems. Conservationists are often loath to rely too heavily on the instrumental argument because it could potentially force them to admit that some ecosystems are not at all useful to humans, or that if they are, they are not more useful than (...)
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  30. added 2016-08-08
    Jeremy Michael Pober (2013). Addiction is Not a Natural Kind. Frontiers in Psychiatry 4:123.
    I argue that addiction is not an appropriate category to support generalizations for the purposes of scientific prediction. That is, addiction is not a natural kind. I discuss the Homeostatic Property Cluster (HPC) theory of kinds, according to which members of a kind share a cluster of properties generated by a common mechanism or set of mechanisms. Leading accounts of addiction in literature fail to offer a mechanism that explains addiction across substances. I discuss popular variants of the disease conception (...)
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  31. added 2016-08-08
    Nicholas Shea, Representation in the Genome and in Other Inheritance Systems.
    There is ongoing controversy as to whether the genome is a representing system. Although it is widely recognised that DNA carries information, both correlating with and coding for various outcomes, neither of these implies that the genome has semantic properties like correctness or satisfaction conditions, In the Scope of Logic, Methodology, and the Philosophy of Sciences, Vol. II. Kluwer, Dordrecht, pp. 387-400). Here a modified version of teleosemantics is applied to the genome to show that it does indeed have semantic (...)
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  32. added 2016-08-07
    Tatiane Tagliatti Maciel, Bruno Corrêa Barbosa & Fabio Prezoto (2016). Foraging Behavior of Fire Ant Solenopsis Saevissima (Smith) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Felis Catus Linnaeus (Carnivora: Felidae) Carcass. Sociobiology 62 (4).
    Solenopsis saevissima fire ants were found foraging in a Felis catus carcass over tissues an secretions present in holes and mucosa. The ants built a dirt-made physical structure around the carcass, which prevented necrophagous flies from laying eggs or larvae in the body. These observations are relevant to increasing knowledge on the role of this ant genus in the decaying process of other animal corpses, including humans.
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  33. added 2016-08-07
    Mateus Detoni, Maria do Carmo Mattos, Mariana Monteiro de Castro, Bruno Corrêa Barbosa & Fabio Prezoto (2015). Activity Schedule and Foraging in Protopolybia Sedula (Hymenoptera, Vespidae). Revista Colombiana de Entomología 41 (2).
    Protopolybia sedula is a social swarming wasp, widely spread throughout many countries in the Americas, including most of Brazil. Despite its distribution, studies of its behavioral ecology are scarce. This study aimed to describe its foraging activity and relation to climatic variables in the city of Juiz de Fora in southeastern Brazil. Three colonies were under observation between 07:00 and 18:00 during April 2012, January 2013, and March 2013. Every 30 minutes, the number of foragers leaving and returning to the (...)
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  34. added 2016-08-07
    Francisco Virgínio (2015). Nesting Polybia Rejecta (Fabricius) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) Associated with Azteca Chartifex Forel (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Ecotone Caatinga/Atlantic Forest, in the State of Rio Grande Do Norte. Entomobrasillis 8 (3).
    Some neotropical social wasps which are associated with some vertebrates and other insects like ants, and these interactions are reported for decades, but little is known about the presence of these in the Caatinga and Atlantic Forest. This study describes the first association’s record between nests of Polybia rejecta (Fabricius) wasp and Azteca chartifex Forel ants in the transition area of the Atlantic Forest and Caatinga in Rio Grande do Norte. The observations were in a private forest in Monte Alegre, (...)
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  35. added 2016-08-07
    Robson Henrique Carvalho, Pedro Dutra Lacerda, Sarah da Silva Mendes, Bruno Corrêa Barbosa, Mariana Paschoalini, Fábio Prezoto & Bernadete Maria de Sousa (2015). Marine Debris Ingestion by Sea Turtles (Testudines) on the Brazilian Coast: An Underestimated Threat? Marine Pollution Bulletin 101 (3):746-749.
    Assessment of marine debris ingestion by sea turtles is important, especially to ensure their survival. From January to December 2011, 23 specimens of five species of sea turtleswere found dead or dying after being rehabilitated, along the coast of the municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. To detect the presence of marine debris in the digestive tract of these turtles, we conducted a postmortemexamination from the esophagus until the distal portion of the large intestine for each specimen. Of the total (...)
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  36. added 2016-08-07
    Marcos Magalhaes de Souza, L. N. Perillo, Bruno Correa Barbosa & Fabio Prezoto (2015). Use of Flight Interception Traps of Malaise Type and Attractive Traps for Social Wasps Record (Vespidae: Polistinae). Sociobiology 62 (3).
    The literature provides different methodologies for sampling social wasps, including, flight intercept trap type Malaise and Attractive trap, however, there is no consensus on its use. In this respect, the aim of this study was to evaluate the best use of Malaise traps and Attractive trap in biodiversity work of social wasps, and generate a collection protocol for the use of these traps. The study was conducted in the Parque Estadual do Rio Doce, located in the east of the state (...)
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  37. added 2016-08-06
    Douglas Campbell (forthcoming). A Case for Resurrecting Lost Species—Review Essay of Beth Shapiro’s, “How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction”. Biology and Philosophy:1-13.
    The title of Beth Shapiro’s ‘How to Clone a Mammoth’ contains an implicature: it suggests that it is indeed possible to clone a mammoth, to bring extinct species back from the dead. But in fact Shapiro both denies this is possible, and denies there would be good reason to do it even if it were possible. The de-extinct ‘mammoths’ she speaks of are merely ecological proxies for mammoths—elephants re-engineered for cold-tolerance by the addition to their genomes of a few mammoth (...)
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  38. added 2016-08-06
    Snait Gissis, Ehud Lamm & Ayelet Shavit (eds.) (forthcoming). Landscapes of Collectivity. MIT Press.
  39. added 2016-08-06
    Jonathan Beever & Nicolae Morar (forthcoming). Bioethics and the Challenge of the Ecological Individual. Environmental Philosophy.
  40. added 2016-08-05
    Massimiliano Simons (2016). The End and Rebirth of Nature? From Politics of Nature to Synthetic Biology. Philosophica 47:109-124.
    In this article, two different claims about nature are discussed. On the one hand, environmental philosophy has forced us to reflect on our position within nature. We are not the masters of nature as was claimed before. On the other hand there are the recent developments within synthetic biology. It claims that, now at last, we can be the masters of nature we have never been before. The question is then raised how these two claims must be related to one (...)
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  41. added 2016-08-04
    Carol Booth (2016). Environmental Skill: Motivation, Knowledge, and the Possibility of a Non-Romantic Environmental Ethics. Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):235-237.
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  42. added 2016-08-02
    Eoin O’Neill (2016). The Precautionary Principle: A Preferred Approach for the Unknown. Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):153-156.
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  43. added 2016-07-31
    Robert James M. Boyles (2011). The Enemy: A Thought Experiment on Patriarchies, Feminisms and Memes. In Jeane Peracullo & Noelle Leslie Dela Cruz (eds.), Feminista: Gender, Race, and Class in the Philippines. Anvil Publishing, Inc. 53–64.
    This article examines who or what should be the target of feminist criticism. Throughout the discussion, the concept of memes is applied in analyzing systems such as patriarchy and feminism itself. Adapting Dawkins' theory on genes, this research puts forward the possibility that patriarchies and feminisms are memeplexes competing for the limited energy and memory space of humanity.
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  44. added 2016-07-29
    Simon Fitzpatrick & Grant Goodrich (forthcoming). Building a Science of Animal Minds: Lloyd Morgan, Experimentation, and Morgan’s Canon. Journal of the History of Biology.
    Conwy Lloyd Morgan (1852–1936) is widely regarded as the father of modern comparative psychology. Yet, Morgan initially had significant doubts about whether a genuine science of comparative psychology was even possible, only later becoming more optimistic about our ability to make reliable inferences about the mental capacities of non-human animals. There has been a fair amount of disagreement amongst scholars of Morgan’s work about the nature, timing, and causes of this shift in Morgan’s thinking. We argue that Morgan underwent two (...)
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  45. added 2016-07-28
    Andrew Jameton (2016). Time Frames for Saving the Planet. Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):136-140.
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  46. added 2016-07-27
    Arnon Levy (forthcoming). Causal Order and Kinds of Robustness. In Snait Gissis, Ehud Lamm & Ayelet Shavit (eds.), Landscapes of Collectivity. MIT Press
    This paper derives from a broader project dealing with the notion of causal order. I use this term to signify two kinds of parts-whole dependence: Orderly systems have rich, decomposable, internal structure; specifically, parts play differential roles, and interactions are primarily local. Disorderly systems, in contrast, have a homogeneous internal structure, such that differences among parts and organizational features are less important. Orderliness, I suggest, marks one key difference between individuals and collectives. My focus here will be the connection between (...)
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  47. added 2016-07-25
    Caleb Ward (2016). The Ethics of Eating as a Human Organism. In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge 48-58.
    Conventional ethics of how humans should eat often ignore that human life is itself a form of organic activity. Using Henri Bergson’s notions of intellect and intuition, this chapter brings a wider perspective of the human organism to the ethical question of how humans appropriate life for nutriment. The intellect’s tendency to instrumentalize living things as though they were inert seems to subtend the moral failures evident in practices such as industrial animal agriculture. Using the case study of Temple Grandin’s (...)
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  48. added 2016-07-23
    Duncan Purves (2016). The Case for Discounting the Future. Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):213-230.
    Though economists appear to discount future well-being when evaluating the costs of climate change, plausible justifications of this practice have not been forthcoming. The methods of economists thus seem to contravene the requirements of justice by discounting the moral importance of future well-being simply because it exists in the future. I defend the practice of discounting the future against the charge of injustice on grounds that moral theorists of different stripes can accept. I argue that, because public policy choices are (...)
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  49. added 2016-07-21
    Jacob Stegenga (2009). Jessica Riskin , Genesis Redux: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2007. Pp. Xvii+389. ISBN 978-0-226-72081-4. £16.00, $25.00. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 42 (3):437.
  50. added 2016-07-20
    Christian Baatz (2016). Reply to My Critics: Justifying the Fair Share Argument. Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):160-169.
    In an earlier article I argued that individuals are obligated not to exceed their fair share of emissions entitlements, that many exceed their fair share at present and thus ought to reduce their emissions as far as can reasonably be demanded. The peer commentators raised various insightful and pressing concerns, but the following objections seem particularly important: It was argued that the fair share argument is insufficiently justified, that it is incoherent, that it would result in more far-reaching duties than (...)
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