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History/traditions: Violence
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  1. Hanan Alexander (2014). Education in Nonviolence: Levinas' Talmudic Readings and the Study of Sacred Texts. Ethics and Education 9 (1):58-68.
  2. Larry Alexander (1993). Self-Defense, Justification and Excuse. Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (1):53-66.
  3. Andrew Alexandra (2012). Private Military and Security Companies and the Liberal Conception of Violence. Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (3):158-174.
    Abstract The institution of war is the broad framework of rules, norms, and organizations dedicated to the prevention, prosecution, and resolution of violent conflict between political entities. Important parts of that institution consist of the accountability arrangements that hold between armed forces, the political leaders who oversee and direct the use of those forces, and the people in whose name the leaders act and from whose ranks the members of the armed forces are drawn. Like other parts of the institution, (...)
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  4. Hannah Arendt & Hans Jürgen Benedict (2009). Revolution, Violence, and Power: A Correspondence. Constellations 16 (2):302-306.
  5. Samantha Ashenden (forthcoming). On Violence in Habermas's Philosophy of Language. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885113499146.
    Habermas does not rule out the possibility of violence in language. In fact his account explicitly licenses a broad conception of violence as ‘systematically distorted communication’. Yet he does rule out the possibility that language simultaneously imposes as it discloses. That is, his argument precludes the possibility of recognizing that there is an antinomy at the heart of language and philosophical reason. This occlusion of the simultaneously world-disclosing and world-imposing character of language feeds and sustains Habermas’s legal and political arguments, (...)
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  6. Alain Badiou (2013). Philosophy for Militants. Verso.
    Enigmatic relationship between philosophy and politics -- Figure of the soldier -- Politics as a nonexpressive dialectics.
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  7. Etienne Balibar (2001). Outlines of a Topography of Cruelty: Citizenship and Civility in the Era of Global Violence. Constellations 8 (1):15-29.
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  8. László Levente Balogh (2011). Az Erőszak Kritikája: Tanulmányok. Debreceni Egyetemi Kiadó.
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  9. Tarak Barkawi (2002). Organising Violence in World Politics: A Review Essay. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 5 (1):101-120.
  10. William J. Behre, Ron Avi Astor & Heather Ann Meyer (2001). Elementary- and Middle-School Teachers' Reasoning About Intervening in School Violence: An Examination of Violence-Prone School Subcontexts. Journal of Moral Education 30 (2):131-153.
    The study compared middle-school and elementary-school teachers' (N = 108) reasoning about their professional roles when violence occurred in "undefined" and potentially violence-prone school subcontexts (e.g. hallways, cafeterias, playgrounds). The study combined concepts from urban planing, architecture, criminology and cognitive developmental domain theory to explore teachers' moral attributions towards school spaces. Participants were asked to locate dangerous locations and discuss their professional roles in those locations. Teachers were also given hypothetical situations where the specific subcontexts (i.e. hallways, classroom, school yard) (...)
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  11. Robert Bernasconi (2011). Perpetual Peace and the Invention of Total War. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  12. Joseph R. Biden (1998). Commentary: Attacking Youth Violence. Criminal Justice Ethics 17 (1):2-67.
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  13. Peg Birmingham (2011). Agamben on Violence, Language, and Human Rights. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  14. Jeffrey Bloechl (2011). Towards an Anthropology of Violence: Existential Analyses of Levinas, Girard, Freud. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  15. Geoff Boucher (2010). Slavoj Žižek, Violence. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 10 (3):425-430.
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  16. Richard Bourne, Eli H. Newberger & C. Sue White (forthcoming). Mandated Child Abuse Reporting. Ethics and Behavior.
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  17. Cristian Bratu (2011). Political Violence and/as Evil : Sartre's Dirty Hands. In Scott M. Powers (ed.), Evil in Contemporary French and Francophone Literature. Cambridge Scholars Pub..
  18. Torkel Brekke (2004). Wielding the Rod of Punishment – War and Violence in the Political Science of Kautilya. Journal of Military Ethics 3 (1):40-52.
    This article presents Kautilya, the most important thinker in the tradition of statecraft in India. Kautilya has influenced ideas of war and violence in much of South- and Southeast Asia and he is of great importance for a comparative understanding of the ethics of war. The violence inflicted by the king on internal and external enemies is pivotal for the maintenance of an ordered society, according to Kautilya. Prudence and treason are hallmarks of Kautilya's world. The article shows that this (...)
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  19. Bruce Buchan (2001). Liberalism and Fear of Violence. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (3):27-48.
    Liberal political thought is underwritten by an enduring fear of civil and state violence. It is assumed within liberal thought that self?interest characterises relations between individuals in civil society, resulting in violence. In absolutist doctrines, such as Hobbes?, the pacification of private persons depended on the Sovereign's command of a monopoly of violence. Liberals, by contrast, sought to claim that the state itself must be pacified, its capacity for cruelty (e.g., torture) removed, its capacity for violence (e.g., war) reduced and (...)
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  20. Richard M. Buck (2004). Beyond Retribution. Social Philosophy Today 20:67-80.
    The very nature of terrorism and the context in which it typically occurs make responding to it much more complicated, morally speaking, than responding to conventional military attacks. Two points are particularly important here: (1) terrorism often arises in the midst of conflicts that can only be resolved at the negotiating table; (2) responses to terrorist acts almost always present significant risks to the lives and well-being of noncombatants. The history of the Israel-Palestinian conflict suggests that its resolution will only (...)
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  21. Nicole Gastineau Campos & Paul Farmer (2003). Partners: Discernment and Humanitarian Efforts in Settings of Violence. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):506-515.
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  22. Terrell Carver (2010). Sex, Violence and Crime: Foucault and the |[Lsquo]|Man|[Rsquo]| Question. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):347.
  23. Jacek Chrobaczyński & Wojciech Wrzesiński (eds.) (2004). Dramat Przemocy W Historycznej Perspektywie. Wydawnictwo Wam.
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  24. C. A. J. Coady (1985). The Idea of Violence. Philosophical Papers 14 (1):3-19.
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  25. Clare Connors (2010). Force From Nietzsche to Derrida. Legenda, Modern Humanities Research Association and Maney Publishing.
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  26. Stanley Corngold (1989). Potential Violence in Paul De Man. Critical Review 3 (1):117-137.
    PAUL DE MAN: DECONSTRUCTION AND THE CRITIQUE OF AESTHETIC IDEOLOGY by Christopher Norris New York: Routledge, 1988. 218pp. $12.95 (paper).
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  27. Cory A. Crane, Samuel W. Hawes, Dolores Mandel & Caroline J. Easton (2013). Informed Consent: An Ethical Issue in Conducting Research with Male Partner Violent Offenders. Ethics and Behavior 23 (6):477-488.
    Ethical codes help guide the methods of research that involves samples gathered from ?at-risk? populations. The current article reviews general as well as specific ethical principles related to gathering informed consent from partner violent offenders mandated to outpatient treatment, a group that may be at increased risk of unintentional coercion in behavioral sciences research due to court mandates that require outpatient treatment without the ethical protections imbued upon prison populations. Recommendations are advanced to improve the process of informed consent within (...)
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  28. Simon Critchley (2011). Violent Thoughts About Slavoj Zizek. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group. 183-204.
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  29. Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt (2012). No Right to Resist? Elise Reimarus's "Freedom" as a Kantian Response to the Problem of Violent Revolt. Hypatia 27 (4):755 - 773.
    One of the greatest woman intellectuals of eighteenth-century Germany is Elise Reimarus, whose contribution to Enlightenment political theory is rarely acknowledged today. Unlike other social contract theorists, Reimarus rejects a people's right to violent resistance or revolution in her philosophical dialogue Freedom (1791). Exploring the arguments in Freedom, this paper observes a number of similarities in the political thought of Elise Reimarus and Immanuel Kant. Both, I suggest, reject violence as an illegitimate response to perceived political injustice in a way (...)
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  30. Kim Dammers, Anthony B. Iton, Karen J. Mathis, Patricia M. Speck & David E. Nahmias (2007). Innovative Tools to Fight Gang Violence. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35:118-119.
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  31. Nicolas de Warren (2006). Apocalypse of Hope: Political Violence in the Writings of Sartre and Fanon. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 27 (1):1-35.
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  32. Peter DeAngelis (2011). The Logic of Violence: Foucault on How Power Kills. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  33. James Dodd (2011). Violence and Non-Violence. In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  34. James Dodd (2009). Violence and Phenomenology. Routledge.
    Introduction: Reflections on violence -- Schmitt's challenge (Clausewitz, Schmitt) -- On violence (Arendt, Sartre) -- On the line (Junger, Heidegger) -- Violence and responsibility (Patoka) -- Conclusion: Six problems of violence.
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  35. David C. Durst (1998). Heidegger on the Problem of Metaphysics and Violence. Heidegger Studies 14:93-110.
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  36. Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.) (2011). Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
    A range of leading philosophers set the best resources of the philosophical tradition to the task of interpreting violence in its diverse expressions. >.
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  37. Stephen L. Esquith (2012). Reframing the Responsibilities of Bystanders Through Film. Political Theory 41 (1):0090591712463197.
    Political responsibilities for systemic mass violence have been subordinated to the moral guilt and legal liability of perpetrators and collaborators, while the role of the bystander has been narrowly construed in terms of charitable rescue or negligence. This dominant victim–perpetrator framework ignores the complex political dimensions of bystander responsibilities for systemic mass violence, especially those responsibilities that stem from the benefits that bystanders receive. The films of Claude Lanzmann, Rithy Panh, and Yael Hersonski contain elements of an alternative framework of (...)
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  38. Andrew Fitz-Gibbon (forthcoming). Somaesthetics: Body Consciousness and Nonviolence. Social Philosophy Today.
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  39. Elizabeth Frazer & Kimberly Hutchings (2008). On Politics and Violence: Arendt Contra Fanon. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (1):90-108.
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  40. Barry L. Gan (2008). Means and Ends, Nonviolence and Politics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:177-184.
    During the latter half of the twentieth century political realism dominated national and international landscapes. The twenty-first century has seen the rise of neo‐conservatism, what Charles Krauthammer has called “democratic realism” and what others see as a re-birth of Wilsonianism—making the world safe for democracy. Robert M. Gates, U.S. Secretary of Defense, in a speech on Sept. 17, 2007 in Williamsburg, VA, at the World Forum on the Future of Democracy, acknowledged these different strains of current U.S. policy, saying that (...)
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  41. Erinn Gilson (2013). Review Essay: Ann Murphy, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):173-182.
    Review essay of Ann V. Murphy, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary.
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  42. Rose Gorman (2003). Latin American Liberationist Approaches to Nonviolence. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 13 (2):85-104.
  43. Michael C. Gottlieb (1995). Family Violence and Family Systems: Who is the Patient? Ethics and Behavior 5 (3):273 – 277.
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  44. Vinit Haksar (2012). Violence in a Spirit of Love: Gandhi and the Limits of Non-Violence. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):303-324.
    The paper considers how Mahatma Gandhi?s Law of Ahimsa (or non-violence) can be reconciled with the necessity of violence; some of the strategies that Gandhi adopts in response to this problem are critically examined. Gandhi was willing to use (outward) violence as an expedience (in the sense of necessity), but he was opposed to using non-violence as an expedience. There are two versions of Gandhi?s doctrine. He makes a distinction between outward violence and inner violence. Both versions grant that outward (...)
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  45. Virginia Held (2010). Can the Ethics of Care Handle Violence? Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (2):115-129.
    It may be thought that the ethics of care has developed important insights into the moral values involved in the caring practices of family, friendship, and personal caregiving, but that the ethics of care has little to offer in dealing with violence. The violence of crime, terrorism, war, and violence against women in any context may seem beyond the ethics of care. Skepticism is certainly in order if it is suggested that we can deal with violence simply by caring. Violence (...)
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  46. Virginia Held (2005). Legitimate Authority in Non-State Groups Using Violence. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (2):175–193.
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  47. Thomas E. Hill Jr (1997). A Kantian Perspective on Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):105-140.
    Rejecting Kant's absolute opposition to revolution, I propose a modified Kantian perspective for reflecting on political violence, drawing from Kant's basic ideas but abandoning some dubious assumptions. Developing suggestions in earlier papers, the essay sketches a model for “moral legislation” that combines the core ideas of each of Kant's formulas of the Categorical Imperative. Though only a framework for deliberation, not a complete decision procedure, this excludes extremist positions, prohibitive and permissive, about political violence. Despite Kant's hopes, the values implicit (...)
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  48. Thomas E. Hill (1997). A Kantian Perspective on Political Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):105 - 140.
    Rejecting Kant''s absolute opposition to revolution, I propose a modified Kantian perspective for reflecting on political violence, drawing from Kant''s basic ideas but abandoning some dubious assumptions. Developing suggestions in earlier papers, the essay sketches a model for moral legislation that combines the core ideas of each of Kant''s formulas of the Categorical Imperative. Though only a framework for deliberation, not a complete decision procedure, this excludes extremist positions, prohibitive and permissive, about political violence. Despite Kant''s hopes, the values implicit (...)
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  49. Robert L. Holmes (2009). Morality and Political Violence • by C. A. J. Coady. Analysis 69 (2):390-392.
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  50. Ted Honderich (1980). Violence for Equality: Inquiries in Political Philosophy: Incorporating Three Essays on Political Violence. Penguin.
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1 — 50 / 850