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  1. Bernardo Alonso Alonso, Nietzsche Verbrecher.
    Nietzsche berechtigt den groβen Verbrecher, verachtet aber den niedrigen Verbrecher, und immer positiv beurteilt und lobt das Verbrechen, das Böse, die böse Handlung, die Umwertung der Werte folgend, als die höchste Probe der Stärke gegen die Werte, die Tafeln, die Gesetze, die Gebote, die Natur. Der Verbrecher macht mit Sich und mit den Anderen was er will, mit seinem irrationellen Willen zur Macht und mit seiner radikalen "ungeheuren" Umwertung der Werte, er ist jenseits von Gut und Böse, von Wahrheit und (...)
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  2. Juan José Hernández Alonso (1983). "TS Elliot: Contenidos Ideológicos de" Murder in the Cathedral". Naturaleza y Gracia: Revista Cuatrimestral de Ciencias Eclesiásticas 3:435-444.
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  3. G. E. M. Anscombe (1979). Prolegomenon to a Pursuit of the Definition of Murder. Dialectics and Humanism 6 (4):73-77.
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  4. G. E. M. Anscombe (1979). Prolegomenon to a Pursuit of the Definition of Murder. Dialectics and Humanism 6 (4):73-77.
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  5. G. E. M. Anscombe, War and Murder.
    Two attitudes are possible: one, that the world is an absolute jungle and that the exercise of coercive power by rulers is only a manifestation of this; and the other, that it is both necessary and right that there should be this exercise of power, that through it the world is much less of a jungle than it could possibly be without it, so that one should in principle be glad of the existence of such power, and only take exception (...)
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  6. Julian Baggini (2007). The Logic of Murder. The Philosophers' Magazine 37:62-65.
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  7. J. P. V. D. Balsdon (1951). The 'Murder' of Drusus, Son of Tiberius. The Classical Review 1 (02):75-.
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  8. A. A. Barb (1972). Cain's Murder-Weapon and Samson's Jawbone of an Ass. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 35:386-389.
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  9. R. Hedges Bates (1900). Is War Murder? Or, Killing No Murder! Thieving No Robbery! [Signed R.H.B.].
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  10. Alessia T. Bell (2000). Criminal Law/Medical Malpractice: Court Strikes Down Murder Conviction of Physician Where Inappropriate Care Led to Patient's Death. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 28 (2):194-195.
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  11. Guyora Binder, The Culpability of Felony Murder.
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  12. Jeremy Allen Byrd (2007). The Perfect Murder: A Philosophical Whodunit. Synthese 157 (1):47 - 58.
    In his Reasons and Persons, Derek Parfit argues from the possibility of cases of fission and/or fusion of persons that one must reject identity as what matters for personal survival. Instead Parfit concludes that what matters is “psychological connectedness and/or continuity with the right kind of cause,” or what he calls an R-relation. In this paper, I argue that, if one accepts Parfit’s conclusion, one must accept that R-relations are what matter for moral responsibility as well. Unfortunately, it seems that (...)
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  13. Marc Champagne (2011). What About Suicide Bombers? A Terse Response to a Terse Objection. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 11 (2):233–236.
    Stressing that the pronoun "I" picks out one and only one person in the world (i.e., me), I argue against Hunt (and other like-minded Rand commentators) that the supposed "hard case" of destructive people who do not care for their own lives poses no special difficulty for rational egoism. I conclude that the proper response to a terse objection like "What about suicide bombers?" is the equally terse assertion "But I don't want to get blown up.".
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  14. Michael Cholbi (2006). Race, Capital Punishment, and the Cost of Murder. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):255 - 282.
    Numerous studies indicate that racial minorities are both more likely to be executed for murder and that those who murder them are less likely to be executed than if they murder whites. Death penalty opponents have long attempted to use these studies to argue for a moratorium on capital punishment. Whatever the merits of such arguments, they overlook the fact that such discrimination alters the costs of murder; racial discrimination imposes higher costs on minorities for murdering through tougher sentences, and (...)
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  15. Russell Christopher (2004). Does Attempted Murder Deserve Greater Punishment Than Murder? Moral Luck and the Duty to Prevent Harm. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 18 (2):419-436.
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  16. Romane Clark (1986). Murderers Are Not Obliged to Murder; Another Solution to Forrester's Paradox. Philosophical Papers 15 (1):51-57.
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  17. Daniel Cohen & Morgan Luck (2009). Why a Victim's Age is Irrelevant When Assessing the Wrongness of Killing. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):396-401.
    abstract Intuitively, all killings are equally wrong, no matter how old one's victim. In this paper we defend this claim — The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis — against a challenge presented by Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen. Lippert-Rasmussen shows The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis to be incompatible with two further theses: The Unequal Wrongness of Renderings Unconscious Thesis and The Equivalence Thesis. Lippert-Rasmussen argues that, of the three, The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis is the least defensible. He suggests that the (...)
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  18. Thomas V. Cohen (2002). Reflections on Retelling a Renaissance Murder. History and Theory 41 (4):7–16.
    This mischievously artful essay plays out on several levels; think of them as storeys of an imaginary castle much like the real, solid, central Italian one it explores and expounds. On its own ground floor, the essay recounts a gruesome murder, a noble husband’s midnight revenge upon his wife and upon her bastard lover, his own half-brother, in her castle chamber, in bed. In sex. Of course. The murder itself is pure Renaissance, quintessential Boccaccio or Bandello, but the aftermath, in (...)
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  19. Raphael Cohen-Almagor & Sharon Haleva-Amir (2008). Bloody Wednesday in Dawson College - The Story of Kimveer Gill, or Why Should We Monitor Certain Websites to Prevent Murder. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (3).
    The article deals with the Dawson College Massacre, focusing on the story of Kimveer Gill, a 25-year-old man from Laval, Montreal who wished to murder young students in Dawson College. It is argued that the international community should continue working together to devise rules for monitoring specific Internet sites, as human lives are at stake. Preemptive measures could prevent the translation of murderous thoughts into murderous actions. Designated monitoring mechanisms of certain websites that promote violence and seek legitimacy as well (...)
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  20. Clayton E. Cramer (1994). Ethical Problems of Mass Murder Coverage in the Mass Media. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 9 (1):26 – 42.
    This article analyzes news coverage of mass murders in Time and Newsweek for the period 1984 to 1991 for evidence of disproportionate, perhaps politically motivated coverage of certain categories of mass murder. Discusses ethical problems related to news and entertainment attention to mass murder, and suggests methods of enhancing the public's understanding of the nature of murder.
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  21. Martin Cropp (2003). Tragic Violations E. Belfiore: Murder Among Friends. Violation of Philia in Greek Tragedy . Pp. XIX + 282. Newyork and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Cased, £36.50. Isbn: 0-19-513149-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):16-.
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  22. Malcolm Davies (1994). Odyssey 22.474–7: Murder or Mutilation? Classical Quarterly 44 (02):534-.
    The treatment of the goatherd Melanthius in these lines received remarkably little animadversion from earlier commentators . In contrast, the late Manuel Fernandez-Galiano devoted an extremely full note to the passage. One may wonder, however, whether he was right to base it on the automatic assumption that what we have depicted here is an act of murder. He himself admits that we are not ‘told exactly at what moment the unfortunate Melanthius dies’. :πότομος ατη κα δεινοτάτη ποιν, ξ ς εκς (...)
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  23. Michael Davis (2010). What Punishment for the Murder of 10,000? Res Publica 16 (2):101-118.
    Those who commit crime on a grand scale, numbering their victims in the thousands, seem to pose a special problem both for consequentialist and for non-consequentialist theories of punishment, a problem the International Criminal Court makes practical. This paper argues that at least one non-consequentialist theory of punishment, the fairness theory, can provide a justification of punishment for great crimes. It does so by dividing the question into two parts, the one of proportion which it answers directly, and the other (...)
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  24. Daniel C. Dennett (1997). Did Hal Committ Murder? In D. Stork (ed.), Hal's Legacy: 2001's Computer As Dream and Reality. MIT Press
    The first robot homicide was committed in 1981, according to my files. I have a yellowed clipping dated 12/9/81 from the Philadelphia Inquirer--not the National Enquirer--with the headline: Robot killed repairman, Japan reports The story was an anti-climax: at the Kawasaki Heavy Industries plant in Akashi, a malfunctioning robotic arm pushed a repairman against a gearwheel-milling machine, crushing him to death. The repairman had failed to follow proper instructions for shutting down the arm before entering the workspace. Why, indeed, had (...)
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  25. Philip E. Devine (1979). The Conscious Acceptance of Guilt in the Necessary Murder. Ethics 89 (3):221-239.
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  26. Nora Devlin (2010). The Ethics of Archiving "Murderabilia". Journal of Information Ethics 19 (1):126-140.
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  27. Mark Dooley (1995). Murder on Moriah. Philosophy Today 39 (1):67-82.
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  28. Nicholas Everitt (1992). What's Wrong with Murder? Some Thoughts on Human and Animal Killing. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (1):47-54.
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  29. Marie Failinger (2009). The Lesser Violence Than Murder and the Face-to-Face : 'Illegal' Immigrants Stand Over American Law. In Desmond Manderson (ed.), Essays on Levinas and Law: A Mosaic. Palgrave Macmillan
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  30. Bryan Farrow (2005). The Will to Murder. [REVIEW] Janus Head 8 (1).
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  31. Norman Finkel (1996). Culpability and Commonsense Justice: Lessons Learned Betwixt Murder and Madness. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 10 (1):11-64.
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  32. James William Forrester (1984). Gentle Murder, or the Adverbial Samaritan. Journal of Philosophy 81 (4):193-197.
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  33. Romayne Smith Fullerton & Maggie Jones Patterson (2006). Murder in Our Midst: Expanding Coverage to Include Care and Responsibility. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (4):304 – 321.
    Using a U.S. and a Canadian example, in this article we argue that news reports of murder, especially of the heavily covered signal crimes that become part of community storytelling, often employ predetermined formulas that probe intrusively into the lives of those involved in the murder but ultimately come away with only cheaply sketched, stick-figure portraits. The thesis is that crime coverage that is formulaic tends to produce cynicism and a distance between the reader and those involved in the crime. (...)
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  34. P. T. Geach (1976). Murder and Sodomy. Philosophy 51 (197):346 - 348.
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  35. Bennett Gilbert, The Case of Meiwes Ate Brandes.
  36. Lou Goble (1991). Murder Most Gentle: The Paradox Deepens. Philosophical Studies 64 (2):217 - 227.
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  37. Laurence Goldstein (1992). A Buridanian Discussion of Desire, Murder and Democracy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (4):405 – 414.
  38. Laura Suzanne Gordon (forthcoming). Mass Murder. Feminist Studies.
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  39. Kurt Gray, Simulating Murder: The Aversion to Harmful Action.
    Diverse lines of evidence point to a basic human aversion to physically harming others. First, we demonstrate that unwillingness to endorse harm in a moral dilemma is predicted by individual differences in aversive reactivity, as indexed by peripheral vasoconstriction. Next, we tested the specific factors that elicit the aversive response to harm. Participants performed actions such as discharging a fake gun into the face of the experimenter, fully informed that the actions were pretend and harmless. These simulated harmful actions increased (...)
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  40. E. Griew (1986). Reducing Murder to Manslaughter: Whose Job? Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (1):18-23.
    This paper compares two versions of the diminished responsibility defence, which reduces murder to manslaughter: the present statutory formulation and a proposed reformulation. The comparison confirms that evidence such as psychiatrists are commonly invited to give in murder cases takes them beyond their proper role. Paradoxically, although the two formulations mean essentially the same thing, the proposed change of wording must have the practical effect of subduing the psychiatrist's evidence. This conclusion leads to speculation about why psychiatrists are at present (...)
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  41. Boris Groys (2000). The Russian Novel as a Serial Murder or the Poetics of Bureaucracy. In Willem van Reijen & Willem G. Weststeijn (eds.), Subjectivity. Rodopi
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  42. Christopher Hamilton (2007). Nietzsche and the Murder of God. Religious Studies 43 (2):165-182.
    Nietzsche's tortured relationship to the Christian God has received scant attention from commentators. In this paper I seek to map out the central lines a proper understanding of Nietzsche in this regard might take. I argue that fundamental in such an understanding is Nietzsche's profoundly corporeal moral vocabulary, and I trace connections between this vocabulary and Nietzsche's concern with cleanliness, his asceticism, and the notion of a sense of common humanity with others.
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  43. J. R. Hamilton (1985). Murder Into Manslaughter. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (3):160-160.
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  44. R. M. Hare (1977). Geach on Murder and Sodomy. Philosophy 52 (202):467 - 472.
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  45. Sharon E. Hartline (1997). Battered Woman Who Kill: Victims and Agents of Violence. Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (2):56-67.
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  46. D. W. Haslett (2003). Murder and the Exception for Fair Competition. Social Theory and Practice 29 (4):631-654.
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  47. D. W. Haslett (1984). Is Allowing Someone to Die the Same as Murder? Social Theory and Practice 10 (1):81-95.
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  48. Graham Haydon (1999). 2. Right, Wrong and Murder. Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):11–22.
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  49. Steve Heilig (1991). Murder or Mercy? The Debate Over Active Euthanasia has Only Just Begun. HEC Forum 3 (2):95-98.
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  50. Barbara Herman (1989). Murder and Mayhem. The Monist 72 (3):411-431.
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