Search results for 'Suffering Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jamie Mayerfeld (1999). Suffering and Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press.score: 684.0
    In this work, Jamie Mayerfeld undertakes a careful inquiry into the meaning and moral significance of suffering. Understanding suffering in hedonistic terms as an affliction of feeling, he claims that it is an objective psychological condition, amenable to measurement and interpersonal comparison, although its accurate assessment is never easy. Mayerfeld goes on to examine the content of the duty to prevent suffering and the weight it has relative to other moral considerations. He argues that the (...)
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  2. Lilie Chouliaraki (2006). The Spectatorship of Suffering. Sage Publications.score: 648.0
    "The work is on an important topic that has been oft debated but rarely systematically studied – the political, cultural, and moral effects of distant news coverage of suffering. [The book] is extremely well steeped in the relevant literature, including semiotics, discourse analysis, meda and social theory and makes a fresh methodological contribution by looking at the codes and formats of news about suffering. It has a fresh vision and answer to some of the stickiest moral (...)
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  3. Richard Hull, Philosophical, Ethical, and Moral Aspects of Health Care Rationing: A Review of Daniel Callahan's Setting Limits. [REVIEW]score: 564.0
    My assigned task in today’s colloquium is to review philosophers’ perspectives on the broad question of whether health care rationing ought to target the elderly. This is a revolutionary question, particularly in a society that is so sensitive to apparent discrimination, and the question must be approached carefully if it is to be successfully dealt with. Three subordinate questions attend this one and must be addressed in the course of answering it. The first such question has to do with (...)
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  4. Josep E. Corbí (2012/2011). Morality, Self-Knowledge, and Human Suffering: An Essay on the Loss of Confidence in the World. Routledge.score: 540.0
    Relying upon real life examples of human suffering--including torture, genocide, and warfare--as opposed to thought experiments, Corbi proposes a novel approach to self-knowledge that runs counter to standard Kantian approaches to morality.
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  5. Asma Abbas (2010). Liberalism and Human Suffering: Materialist Reflections on Politics, Ethics, and Aesthetics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 528.0
    This book investigates the sources and implications of our encounters with suffering in contemporary politics and culture, exploring the forces that determine ...
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  6. Renée Jeffery (2008). Evil and International Relations: Human Suffering in an Age of Terror. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 468.0
    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the concept of 'evil' has enjoyed renewed popularity in both international political rhetoric and scholarly writing. World leaders, politicians, and intellectuals have increasingly turned to 'evil' to describe the very worst humanitarian atrocities that continue to mark international affairs. However, precisely what 'evil' actually entails is not well understood. Little consensus exists as to what 'evil' is, how it is manifested in the international sphere, and what we ought to do about it. (...)
     
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  7. Vasil Gluchman (2013). Pious Aspects in the Ethical and Moral Views of Matthias Bel. History of European Ideas 39 (6):776-790.score: 441.0
    Summary The author of the paper studies the ethical views of Matthias Bel expressed in his Preface to Johann Arndt's treatise and in Davidian-Solomonian Ethics, which contain a critique of false Christianity and ancient (especially Aristotle's) ethics. Bel refuses any philosophical ethics based on human nature, since man, in his very essence, is sinful and vicious. This leads to the general moral downfall of the young and mankind. He only recognises ethics whose source and the highest good is (...)
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  8. John Portmann (2000). When Bad Things Happen to Other People. Routledge.score: 440.0
    Although many of us deny it, it is not uncommon to feel pleasure over the suffering of others, particularly when we feel that suffering has been deserved. The German word for this concept- Schadenfreude -has become universal in its expression of this feeling. Drawing on the teachings of history's most prominent philosophers, John Portmann explores the concept of Schadenfreude in this rigorous, comprehensive, and absorbing study. Citing examples from literature and popular culture-from the works of Toni Morrison, Umberto (...)
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  9. William Ernest Barton (1966). The Moral Challenge of Communism: Some Ethical Aspects of Marxist-Leninist Society. London, Friends Home Service Committee.score: 433.5
     
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  10. J. Arlebrink (1997). The Moral Roots of Prenatal Diagnosis. Ethical Aspects of the Early Introduction and Presentation of Prenatal Diagnosis in Sweden. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):260-261.score: 430.5
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  11. Gary Duhon (2008). An Uncomfortable Refusal Pp. 15-15 HTML Version | PDF Version (78k) Subject Headings: Premature Infants -- Medical Care -- Moral and Ethical Aspects. Commentary. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 15-16.score: 427.5
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  12. Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.) (2008). Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 416.0
    The entwined history of humans and elephants is fascinating but often sad. People have used elephants as beasts of burden and war machines, slaughtered them for their ivory, exterminated them as threats to people and ecosystems, turned them into objects of entertainment at circuses, employed them as both curiosities and conservation ambassadors in zoos, and deified and honored them in religious rites. How have such actions affected these pachyderms? What ethical and moral imperatives should humans follow to ensure (...)
     
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  13. B. G. Gazzard (1992). AIDS a Moral Issue -- Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (1):51-52.score: 408.0
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  14. S. M. van Geelen, L. L. E. Bolt & M. J. H. van Summeren (2010). Moral Aspects of Bariatric Surgery for Obese Children and Adolescents: The Urgent Need for Empirical-Ethical Research. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):30-32.score: 405.0
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  15. Luigi Alici (ed.) (2011). Il Dolore E la Speranza: Cura Della Responsabilità, Responsabilità Della Cura. Aracne.score: 396.0
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  16. Sheldon Ekland-Olson (2011). Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Decides?: Abortion, Neonatal Care, Assisted Dying, Capital Punishment. Routledge.score: 396.0
  17. Klaus Reinhardt, Henrieke Stahl & Harald Schwaetzer (eds.) (2004). Umgang Mit Leid: Cusanische Perspektiven. S. Roderer-Verlag.score: 396.0
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  18. Andrew Linzey (2009). Why Animal Suffering Matters: Philosophy, Theology, and Practical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 392.0
    Introduction: Reason, ethics, and animals -- Part I: Making the rational case -- Why animal suffering matters morally -- How we minimize animal suffering and how we can change -- Part II: Three practical critiques -- First case: Hunting with dogs -- Second case: Fur farming -- Third case: Commercial sealing -- Conclusion: Re-establishing animals and children as a common cause and six objections considered.
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  19. Suzanne Shale (2012). Moral Leadership in Medicine: Building Ethical Healthcare Organizations. Cambridge University Press.score: 387.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Why medicine needs moral leaders; 2. Creating an organizational narrative; 3. Understanding normative expectations in medical moral leadership; Prologue to chapters four and five; 4. Expressing fiduciary, bureaucratic and collegial propriety; 5. Expressing inquisitorial and restorative propriety; Epilogue to chapters four and five; 6. Understanding organizational moral narrative; 7. Moral leadership for ethical organizations; Appendix 1. How the research was done; Appendix 2. Accountability for clinical performance: individuals and (...)
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  20. Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.) (2003). Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research: Readings and Commentary. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 387.0
    All investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health are now required to receive training about the ethics of clinical research. Based on a course taught by the editors at NIH, Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research is the first book designed to help investigators meet this new requirement. The book begins with the history of human subjects research and guidelines instituted since World War II. It then covers various stages and components of the clinical trial process: (...)
     
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  21. Thomas W. Kallert, Juan E. Mezzich & John Monahan (eds.) (2011). Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry: Clinical, Legal and Ethical Aspects. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 382.5
    This book considers coercion within the healing and ethical framework of therapeutic relationships and partnerships at all levels, and addresses the universal ...
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  22. Iva Smit, Wendell Wallach & G. E. Lasker (eds.) (2005). Cognitive, Emotive, and Ethical Aspects of Decision Making in Humans and in Ai. International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics.score: 373.5
  23. John Harris (1992). Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology. Oxford University Press.score: 356.0
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, biotechnology (...)
     
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  24. Gosia M. Brykczyńska & Joan Simons (eds.) (2011). Ethical and Philosophical Aspects of Nursing Children and Young People. John Wiley & Sons.score: 351.0
    This important new book provides a philosophical and historical analysis of the subject, looking at a review of sociological and political theories concerning ...
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  25. Lars-Eric Nilsson (2008). "But Can't You See They Are Lying": Student Moral Positions and Ethical Practices in the Wake of Technological Change. Distribution, Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis.score: 351.0
     
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  26. Elisa Aaltola (2012). Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 336.0
    Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture explores the multifaceted moral meanings allocated to non-human suffering in contemporary Western culture.
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  27. Scott Veitch (2007). Law and Irresponsibility: On the Legitimation of Human Suffering. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 336.0
    It is commonly understood that in its focus on rights and obligations law is centrally concerned with organising responsibility. In defining how obligations are created, in contract or property law, say, or imposed, as in tort, public, or criminal law, law and legal institutions are usually seen as society’s key mode of asserting and defining the content and scope of responsibilities. This book takes the converse view: legal institutions are centrally involved in organising irresponsibility. Particularly with respect to the production (...)
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  28. Donald A. Brown (2013). Climate Change Ethics: Navigating the Perfect Moral Storm. Routledge.score: 297.0
    Part 1. Introduction -- Introduction: Navigating the Perfect Moral Storm in Light of a Thirty-Five Year Debate -- Thirty-Five Year Climate Change Policy Debate -- Part 2. Priority Ethical Issues -- Ethical Problems with Cost Arguments -- Ethics and Scientific Uncertainty Arguments -- Atmospheric Targets -- Allocating National Emissions Targets -- Climate Change Damages and Adaptation Costs -- Obligations of Sub-national Governments, Organizations, Businesses, and Individuals -- Independent Responsibility to Act -- Part 3. The Crucial Role of (...)
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  29. Louis M. Guenin (2008). The Morality of Embryo Use. Cambridge University Press.score: 296.0
    Is it permissible to use a human embryo in stem cell research, or in general as a means for benefit of others? Acknowledging each embryo as an object of moral concern, Louis M.Guenin argues that it is morally permissible to decline intrauterine transfer of an embryo formed outside the body, and that from this permission and the duty of beneficence, there follows a consensus justification for using donated embryos in service of humanitarian ends. He then proceeds to show how (...)
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  30. Gregor Betz & Sebastian Cacean (2012). Ethical Aspects of Climate Engineering. Karlsruhe. KIT Scientific Publishing.score: 294.0
    This study investigates the ethical aspects of deploying and researching into so-called climate engineering methods, i.e. large-scale technical interventions in the climate system with the objective of offsetting anthropogenic climate change. The moral reasons in favour of and against R&D into and deployment of CE methods are analysed by means of argument maps. These argument maps provide an overview of the CE controversy and help to structure the complex debate.
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  31. M. W. Ross (1989). Psychosocial Ethical Aspects of AIDS. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (2):74-81.score: 291.0
    The psychosocial morbidity associated with HIV infection and responses to such infection may exceed morbidity associated with medical sequelae of such infection. This paper argues that negative judgements on those with HIV infection or in groups associated with such infection will cause avoidable psychological and social distress. Moral judgements made regarding HIV infection may also harm the common good by promoting conditions which may increase the spread of HIV infection. This paper examines these two lines of argument with regard (...)
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  32. Matthew Scully (2002). Dominion: The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy. St. Martin's Press.score: 288.0
    "And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth." --Genesis 1:24-26 In this crucial passage from the Old Testament, God grants mankind power over animals. But with this privilege comes the grave responsibility to respect life, to treat animals with (...)
     
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  33. Bernice Bovenkerk & Franck L. B. Meijboom (2012). The Moral Status of Fish. The Importance and Limitations of a Fundamental Discussion for Practical Ethical Questions in Fish Farming. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):843-860.score: 282.0
    As the world population is growing and government directives tell us to consume more fatty acids, the demand for fish is increasing. Due to declines in wild fish populations, we have come to rely more and more on aquaculture. Despite rapid expansion of aquaculture, this sector is still in a relatively early developmental stage. This means that this sector can still be steered in a favorable direction, which requires discussion about sustainability. If we want to avoid similar problems to the (...)
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  34. Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.score: 279.0
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
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  35. Mary Midgley (1994/1996). The Ethical Primate: Humans, Freedom, and Morality. Routledge.score: 279.0
    In The Ethical Primate , Mary Midgley, 'one of the sharpest critical pens in the West' according to the Times Literary Supplement , addresses the fundamental question of human freedom. Scientists and philosophers have found it difficult to understand how each human-being can be a living part of the natural world and still be free. Midgley explores their responses to this seeming paradox and argues that our evolutionary origin explains both why and how human freedom and morality have come (...)
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  36. Frédéric Gilbert & Susan Dodds (2014). Is There a Moral Obligation to Develop Brain Implants Involving NanoBionic Technologies? Ethical Issues for Clinical Trials. NanoEthics 8 (1):49-56.score: 279.0
    In their article published in Nanoethics, “Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques”, Berger et al. suggest that there may be a prima facie moral obligation to improve neuro implants with nanotechnology given their possible therapeutic advantages for patients [Nanoethics, 2:241–249]. Although we agree with Berger et al. that developments in nanomedicine hold the potential to render brain implant technologies less invasive and to better target neural stimulation to respond to brain impairments (...)
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  37. Willem B. Drees (ed.) (2003). Is Nature Ever Evil?: Religion, Science, and Value. Routledge.score: 276.0
    Can one call nature 'evil'? Or is life a matter of eating and being eaten, where value judgments should not be applied? Is nature beautiful? Or is beauty in the eye of the beholder? Scientists often pretend that their disciplines only describe and analyze natural processes in factual terms, without making evaluative statements regarding reality. However, scientists may also be driven by the beauty of that which they study. Or they may be appalled by suffering they encounter, and look (...)
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  38. Dean A. Kowalski (2010/2012). Moral Theory at the Movies: An Introduction to Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 270.0
    The book incorporates film summaries and study questions to draw students into ethical theory and then pairs them with classical philosophical texts.
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  39. Michael S. Northcott (2007). A Moral Climate: The Ethics of Global Warming. Orbis Books.score: 270.0
    Message from the planet -- When prophecy fails -- Energy and empire -- Climate economics -- Ethical emissions -- Dwelling in the light -- Mobility and pilgrimage -- Faithful feasting -- Remembering in time.
     
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  40. Jona Specker, Farah Focquaert, Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Maartje Schermer (2014). The Ethical Desirability of Moral Bioenhancement: A Review of Reasons. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):67.score: 268.5
    The debate on the ethical aspects of moral bioenhancement focuses on the desirability of using biomedical as opposed to traditional means to achieve moral betterment. The aim of this paper is to systematically review the ethical reasons presented in the literature for and against moral bioenhancement.
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  41. Samuel Mejías Valbuena (2005). Philosophical, Scientist, Moral, Ethics and Religious Analysis in the Juridical Compared Science in the Law of Cloning. S. Mejías Valbuena.score: 268.5
     
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  42. Duane L. Cady (2005). Moral Vision: How Everyday Life Shapes Ethical Thinking. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 267.0
    Ethics and rationality -- Moral frameworks -- Experience in context -- Aesthetic aspects of ethical thought -- Morals and metaphors -- Ethics and pluralism -- Moral thinking -- Afterword: diversity, relativism, and nonviolence.
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  43. Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.) (1995). Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press.score: 267.0
    Over the past decade much significant new work has appeared in the field of Jewish ethics. While much of this work has been devoted to issues in applied ethics, a number of important essays have explored central themes within the tradition and clarified the theoretical foundations of Jewish ethics. This important text grew out of the need for a single work which accurately and conveniently reflects these developments within the field. The first text of its kind in almost two decades, (...)
     
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  44. James D. Proctor & David Marshall Smith (eds.) (1999). Geography and Ethics: Journeys in a Moral Terrain. Routledge.score: 264.0
    Geography and Ethics examines the place of geography in ethics and of ethics in geography by drawing together specially commissioned contributors from distinguished scholars from around the world.
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  45. Marshall Schminke (ed.) (1998). Managerial Ethics: Moral Management of People and Processes. Lawrence Erlbaum Assocs..score: 264.0
    This volumes presents better ways to integrate research on management and ethics. The need for better communication and meaningful ways to change the pattern of thinking in complex organizational settings is discussed and explored.
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  46. Kaija Helin & Unni Å Lindström (2003). Sacrifice: An Ethical Dimension of Caring That Makes Suffering Meaningful. Nursing Ethics 10 (4):414-427.score: 264.0
    This article is intended to raise the question of whether sacrifice can be regarded as constituting a deep ethical structure in the relationship between patient and carer. The significance of sacrifice in a patient-carer relationship cannot, however, be fully understood from the standpoint of the consistently utilitarian ethic that characterizes today’s ethical discourse. Deontological ethics, with its universal principles, also does not provide a suitable point of departure. Ethical recommendations and codices are important and can serve as (...)
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  47. M. J. Newton (1986). Moral Dilemmas in Surgical Training: Intent and the Case for Ethical Ambiguity. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (4):207-211.score: 264.0
    It is often assumed that the central problem in a medical ethics issue is determining which course of action is morally correct. There are some aspects of ethical issues that will yield to such analysis. However, at the core of important medical moral problems is an irreducible dilemma in which all possible courses of action, including inaction, seem ethically unsatisfactory. When facing these issues ethical behaviour depends upon an individual's understanding and acceptance of this painful dilemma (...)
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  48. Francois Berger, Sjef Gevers, Ludwig Siep & Klaus-Michael Weltring (2008). Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques. NanoEthics 2 (3):241-249.score: 261.0
    Nanotechnology is an important platform technology which will add new features like improved biocompatibility, smaller size, and more sophisticated electronics to neuro-implants improving their therapeutic potential. Especially in view of possible advantages for patients, research and development of nanotechnologically improved neuro implants is a moral obligation. However, the development of brain implants by itself touches many ethical, social and legal issues, which also apply in a specific way to devices enabled or improved by nanotechnology. For researchers developing nanotechnology (...)
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  49. Alasdair MacIntyre (2010). Danish Ethical Demands and French Common Goods: Two Moral Philosophies. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):1-16.score: 261.0
    Abstract: Is Knud Eiler Løgstrup's conception of the ethical demand as deeply incompatible with the central theses of 20th century French Thomistic moral philosophy as it seems to be? Discussion of this question requires attention to both the Lutheran and the phenomenological background of Løgstrup's thought; a consideration of the Danish and French social contexts in which the claims of the two moral philosophies were developed; and an enquiry into how far aspects of each are complementary (...)
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  50. Ted van Baarda & Désirée Verweij (eds.) (2009). The Moral Dimension of Asymmetrical Warfare: Counter-Terrorism, Democratic Values and Military Ethics. Martinus Nijhoff.score: 261.0
    PART I The superpower and asymmetry PART II Jus ad bellum, jus in bello, jus post bellum PART III Leadership and accountability PART IV Soldiersa (TM) ...
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