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  1. La Titulature de l'Impératrice Et Sa Signification.Elisabeth Bensammar - 1976 - Byzantion 46:243-291.
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  2. Encountering Mangrove: An Essay In Signification.Naomi Cumming - 1996 - American Journal of Semiotics 13 (1/4):60-102.
  3. Formalisme Et Signification (*).André Guimbretiere, Henri Ronse, Claude Mauriac, Maurice Mouillaud, Jean Rousset & Pierre-Henri Simon - 1965 - Cahiers Internationaux de Symbolisme 7:1.
  4. De la Signification des Normes Juridiques.Georges Kalinowski - 1992 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 5 (2):131-136.
  5. Signification Et Signifiance.Jean Ladrière - 1984 - Synthese 59 (1):59 - 67.
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  6. Review: Linguistic Turns in Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]S. Lapointe - 2007 - Mind 116 (464):1143-1146.
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  7. Signification d'Un Tricentenaire.Robert Misrahi - 1977 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 167 (2):147 - 153.
  8. Language and Signification.Gustav Roth - 1992 - In Gustav Roth & H. S. Prasad (eds.), Philosophy, Grammar, and Indology: Essays in Honour of Professor Gustav Roth. Sri Satguru Publications. pp. 20--37.
  9. Review of Walter Ott, Locke's Philosophy of Language[REVIEW]David Soles - 2004 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (8).
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Locke: Signification
  1. John Locke's "Doctrine of Signs": A New Metaphysics.Robert L. Armstrong - 1965 - Journal of the History of Ideas 26 (3):369.
  2. Locke on Language.E. J. Ashworth - 1984 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 14 (1):45 - 73.
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  3. "Do Words Signify Ideas or Things?" The Scholastic Sources of Locke's Theory of Language.E. J. Ashworth - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (3):299-326.
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  4. Natural Language and Natural Meaning.David J. Cole - manuscript
    In Book II of the _Essay_, at the beginning of his discussion of language in Chapter II ("Of the Signification of Words"), John Locke writes that we humans have a variety of thoughts which might profit others, but that unfortunately these thoughts lie invisible and hidden from others. And so we use language to communicate these thoughts. As a result, "words, in their primary or immediate signification,stand for nothing but _the ideas in the mind of him that uses them_.
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  5. Lockian teleosemantics.Sally Ferguson - 2001 - Locke Studies 1:105-122.
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  6. Locke, Leibniz, Language and Hans Aarsleff.Ian Hacking - 1988 - Synthese 75 (2):135 - 153.
  7. Locke's Doctrine of Signification. Hall - 1998 - Locke Studies 29:85-104.
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  8. Locke's Theory of Signification.Galib Khan - 1987 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 14 (2):135.
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  9. The Main Thesis of Locke's Semantic Theory.Norman Kretzmann - 1968 - Philosophical Review 77 (2):175-196.
  10. Jezik in javno: reorganizacija trivija v Lockovem Eseju in v Portroyalski logiki.Gregor Kroupa - 2013 - Filozofski Vestnik 34 (3):57-74.
    "Language and its Public Features: Reorganizing the Trivium in Locke's Essay and Port-Royal Logic" The new theory of language in the 17th century coincides with the end the traditional order of disciplines in the trivium (grammar, logic and rhetoric), which in the mediaeval times provided a comprehensive view of the problems of discourse. The article focuses on some key passages in Port-Royal Logic and Locke's Essay that provide us with a typical early modern scheme of linguistic representation, characterised by heavily (...)
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  11. Locke's Theory of Meaning.Charles Landesman - 1976 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (1):23-35.
  12. Locke's Formula and the Scope of Semiotics.David Lidov - 1988 - Semiotics:173-179.
  13. Locke on Meaning and Significance.Michael Losonsky - 1996 - In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Clarendon Press.
    The author argues that Locke's theory of signification in the Essay Concerning Human Understanding is a theory of meaning and defends it against criticisms.
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  14. Locke and the Signification of Words.D. Odegard - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
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  15. Locke's Argument From Signification.W. Ott - 2002 - Locke Studies 2:145-76.
    Locke clearly intends what I call his 'linguistic thesis,' the claim that words signify nothing but ideas, to tell against Aristotelian essentialism. I argue that current interpretations of Locke's anti-essentialist arguments have not accorded the linguistic thesis its proper role. This is largely due to the prevalent misreadings of that thesis. Locke's view is that words reliably indicate ideas in the mind of the speaker. It is only once we see this that we can understand how the thesis functions in (...)
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  16. Locke and Signification.Walter R. Ott - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Research 27:449-473.
    This paper addresses the following questions: (a) what did Locke mean when he said that ‘words signify ideas’? and (b) what is Locke’s argument for this thesis, and how successful is it? The paper argues that the two most prominent interpretations, those of Norman Kretzmann and E. J. Ashworth, attribute to Locke an argument for his semantic thesis that is fallacious, and that neither can make good sense of two key passages in book 3 of the Essay concerning Human Understanding. (...)
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  17. Speaking Your Mind: Expression in Locke's Theory of Language.Lewis Powell - 2017 - ProtoSociology 34:15-30.
    There is a tension between John Locke’s awareness of the fundamental importance of a shared public language and the manner in which his theorizing appears limited to offering a psychologistic account of the idiolects of individual speakers. I argue that a correct understanding of Locke’s central notion of signification can resolve this tension. I start by examining a long standing objection to Locke’s view, according to which his theory of meaning systematically gets the subject matter of our discourse wrong, by (...)
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  18. Locke and the Primary Signification of Words: An Approach to Word Meaning.Timothy Pritchard - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):486-506.
    Locke’s claim that the primary signification of (most) words is an idea, or complex of ideas, has received different interpretations. I support the majority view that Locke’s notion of primary signification can be construed in terms of linguistic meaning. But this reading has been seen as making Locke’s account vulnerable to various criticisms, of which I consider two. First, it appears to make the account vulnerable to the charge that an idea cannot play the role that a word meaning should (...)
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  19. Semeiotike [Greek] in Locke.L. J. Russell - 1939 - Mind 48:405.
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  20. Signification, Intention, Projection.Kenneth P. Winkler - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):477-501.
    Locke is what present-day aestheticians, critics, and historians call an intentionalist. He believes that when we interpret speech and writing, we aim—in large part and perhaps even for the most part—to recover the intentions, or intended meanings, of the speaker or writer. Berkeley and Hume shared Locke’s commitment to intentionalism, but it is a theme that recent philosophical interpreters of all three writers have left largely unexplored. In this paper I discuss the bearing of intentionalism on more familiar themes in (...)
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Locke: Propositional Attitudes
  1. Particles and Ideas in Locke's Theory of Meaning.D. Berman - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:15.
  2. Locke on Particles: A Reply to Nuchelmans.David Berman & Timothy Williamson - 1988 - Logique Et Analyse 31 (123-124):213-218.
  3. Locke on Propositions and Assertion.Benjamin Hill - 2008 - Modern Schoolman 85 (3):187-205.
  4. Propositions and Judgments in Locke and Arnauld: A Monstrous and Unholy Union?Jennifer Smalligan Marušić - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (2):255-280.
    Philosophers have accused locke of holding a view about propositions that simply conflates the formation of a propositional thought with the judgment that a proposition is true, and charged that this has obviously absurd consequences.1 Worse, this account appears not to be unique to Locke: it bears a striking resemblance to one found in both the Port-Royal Logic (the Logic, for short) and the Port-Royal Grammar. In the Logic, this account forms part of the backbone of the traditional logic expounded (...)
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  5. Locke: "Our Knowledge, Which All Consists in Propositions".Ruth Marie Mattern - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (4):677 - 695.
  6. Locke and Leibniz on Linguistic Particles.Robert McRae - 1988 - Synthese 75 (2):155 - 161.
  7. Propositional Attitudes in Modern Philosophy.Walter Ott - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (3):551-568.
    Philosophers of the modern period are often presented as having made an elementary error: that of confounding the atttitude one adopts toward a proposition with its content. By examining the works of Locke and the Port-Royalians, I show that this accusation is ill-founded and that Locke, in particular, has the resources to construct a theory of propositional attitudes.
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  8. Locke on Judgment.David Owen - 2007 - In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
    Locke usually uses the term “judgment” in a rather narrow but not unusual sense, as referring to the faculty that produces probable opinion or assent.2 His account is explicitly developed in analogy with knowledge, and like knowledge, it is developed in terms of the relation various ideas bear to one another. Whereas knowledge is the perception of the agreement or disagreement of any of our ideas, judgment is the presumption of their agreement or disagreement. Intuitive knowledge is the immediate perception (...)
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  9. Locke and Hume on Belief, Judgment and Assent.David Owen - 2003 - Topoi 22 (1):15-28.
    Hume's account of belief has been much reviled, especially considered as an account of what it is to assent to or judge a proposition to be true. In fact, given that he thinks that thoughts about existence can be composed of a single idea, and that relations are just complex ideas, it might be wondered whether he has an account of judgment at all. Nonetheless, Hume was extremely proud of his account of belief, discussing it at length in the Abstract, (...)
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  10. Locke, Hume, and Reid on the Objects of Belief.Lewis Powell - 2018 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 35 (1):21-38.
    The goal of this paper is show how an initially appealing objection to David Hume's account of judgment can only be put forward by philosophers who accept an account of judgment that has its own sizable share of problems. To demonstrate this, I situate the views of John Locke, David Hume, and Thomas Reid with respect to each other, so as to illustrate how the appealing objection is linked to unappealing features of Locke's account of judgment.
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  11. Speaking Your Mind: Expression in Locke's Theory of Language.Lewis Powell - 2017 - ProtoSociology 34:15-30.
    There is a tension between John Locke’s awareness of the fundamental importance of a shared public language and the manner in which his theorizing appears limited to offering a psychologistic account of the idiolects of individual speakers. I argue that a correct understanding of Locke’s central notion of signification can resolve this tension. I start by examining a long standing objection to Locke’s view, according to which his theory of meaning systematically gets the subject matter of our discourse wrong, by (...)
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  12. Locke on Knowledge and Propositions.David E. Soles - 1985 - Philosophical Topics 13 (2):19-29.
  13. Locke and Arnauld on Judgment and Proposition.Maria van Der Schaar - 2008 - History and Philosophy of Logic 29 (4):327-341.
    To understand pre-Fregean theories of judgment and proposition, such as those found in Locke and the Port-Royal logic, it is important to distinguish between propositions in the modern sense and propositions in the pre-Fregean sense. By making this distinction it becomes clear that these pre-Fregean theories cannot be meant to solve the propositional attitude problem. Notwithstanding this fact, Locke and Arnauld are able to make a distinction between asserted and unasserted propositions (in their sense). The way Locke makes this distinction (...)
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Locke: Philosophy of Language, Misc
  1. Leibniz on Locke on Language.Hans Aarsleff - 1964 - American Philosophical Quarterly 1 (3):165-188.
  2. Wahrheitsbegriffe von Descartes bis Kant.Michael Albrecht - 2006 - In Markus Enders & Jan Szaif (eds.), Die Geschichte des Philosophischen Begriffs der Wahrheit. De Gruyter. pp. 231--250.
  3. Is Locke's Semiotic Inconsistent?Barry Allen - 1994 - American Journal of Semiotics 11 (3/4):23-31.
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  4. Locke on Language, Meaning and Communication.Alexiadou Anastasia-Sofia - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):159-166.
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  5. Locke on Language, Meaning and Communication.Alexiadou Anastasia-Sofia - 2011 - Philosophical Inquiry 35 (3-4):72-79.
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  6. John Locke on Ultimate Reality and Meaning.Robert L. Armstrong - 1980 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 3 (4):264.
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  7. John Locke's "Doctrine of Signs": A New Metaphysics.Robert L. Armstrong - 1965 - Journal of the History of Ideas 26 (3):369.
  8. Locke's Philosophy of Language.E. J. Ashworth - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (4):530-532.
    This book examines John Locke’s claims about the nature and work- ings of language.WalterOtt proposes a new interpretation of Locke’s thesis that words signify ideas in the mind of the speaker, and argues that rather than employing such notions as sense or reference, Locke relies on an ancient tradition that understands signification as reliable indication.He then uses this interpretation to explain crucial areas of Locke’s metaphysics and epistemology, including essence, abstraction, knowledge, and mental representation. His discussion, which is the first (...)
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