Results for 'Sociology of scientific knowledge'

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  1.  50
    Duhem, Quine, Wittgenstein and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: Continuity of Self-Legitimation?Dominique Raynaud - 2003 - Epistemologia 26 (1):133-160.
    Contemporary sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) is defined by its relativist trend. Its programme often calls for the support of philosophers, such as Duhem, Quine, and Wittgenstein. A critical re-reading of key texts shows that the main principles of relativism are only derivable with difficulty. The thesis of the underdetermination of theory doesn't forbid that Duhem, in many places, validates a correspondence-consistency theory of truth. He never said that social beliefs and interests fill the lack of underdetermination. (...)
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  2. Science as Social Existence: Heidegger and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jeff Kochan - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers.
    Publisher's blurb: In this bold and original study, Jeff Kochan constructively combines the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) with Martin Heidegger’s early existential conception of science. Kochan shows convincingly that these apparently quite different approaches to science are, in fact, largely compatible, even mutually reinforcing. --- This open-access book can be read/downloaded for free at the publisher's website -- https://www.openbookpublishers.com/product/670 -- where the interactive HTML version may also be translated (automatically but imperfectly) into several other languages.
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  3.  52
    The Reflexive Thesis: Wrighting Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Malcolm Ashmore - 1989 - University of Chicago Press.
    This unusually innovative book treats reflexivity, not as a philosophical conundrum, but as a practical issue that arises in the course of scholarly research and argument. In order to demonstrate the concrete and consequential nature of reflexivity, Malcolm Ashmore concentrates on an area in which reflexive "problems" are acute: the sociology of scientific knowledge. At the forefront of recent radical changes in our understanding of science, this increasingly influential mode of analysis specializes in rigorous deconstructions of the (...)
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  4.  28
    The Knowledge Content of Science and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Loet Leydesdorff - 1992 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 23 (2):241-263.
    Several, seemingly unrelated problems of empirical research in the 'sociology of scientific knowledge' can be analyzed as following from initial assumptions with respect to the status of the knowledge content of science. These problems involve: (1) the relation between the level of the scientific field and the group level; (2) the boundaries and the status of 'contexts', and (3) the emergence of so-called 'asymmetry' in discourse analysis. It is suggested that these problems can be clarified (...)
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  5. Conjectures and Reputations:The Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and the History of Economic Thought.D. Wade Hands - 1997 - History of Political Economy 29:695-739.
  6.  15
    Science, Truth and History, Part I. Historiography, Relativism and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.N. Tosh - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (4):675-701.
    Recently, many historians of science have chosen to present their historical narratives from the ‘actors’-eye view’. Scientific knowledge not available within the actors’ culture is not permitted to do explanatory work. Proponents of the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge purport to ground this historiography on epistemological relativism. I argue that they are making an unnecessary mistake: unnecessary because the historiographical genre in question can be defended on aesthetic and didactic grounds; and a mistake because the argument (...)
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  7.  55
    Changing Society by Scientific Investigations? The Unexpected Shared Ground Between Early Sociology of Knowledge and the Vienna Circle.M. Seidel - 2016 - Foundations of Science 21 (1):117-128.
    In this paper, I show that there are important but hitherto unnoticed similarities between key figures of the Vienna Circle and early defenders of sociology of knowledge. The similarities regard their stance on potential implications of the study of science for political and societal issues. I argue that notably Otto Neurath and Karl Mannheim are concerned with proposing a genuine political philosophy of science that is remarkably different from today’s emerging interest in the relation between science and society (...)
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  8. The Problem of Relativism in the Sociology of (Scientific) Knowledge.Richard Schantz & Markus Seidel - 2011 - ontos.
    This volume comprises original articles by leading authors – from philosophy as well as sociology – in the debate around relativism in the sociology of (scientific) knowledge. Its aim has been to bring together several threads from the relevant disciplines and to cover the discussion from historical and systematic points of view. Among the contributors are Maria Baghramian, Barry Barnes, Martin Endreß, Hubert Knoblauch, Richard Schantz and Harvey Siegel.
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  9. Science Made Up: Constructivist Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Arthur Fine - manuscript
    (Draft copy published as “Science Made Up: Constructivist Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.” In P. Galison and D. Stump (eds.) The Disunity of Science: Boundaries, Contexts, and Power. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996, pp. 231-54.).
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  10.  5
    Emergence of a Radical Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: The Strong Programme in the Early Writings of Barry Barnes.Saeid Zibakalam - 1993 - Dialectica 47 (1):3-25.
    SummaryThe early writings of Barry Barnes, as the co‐founder of the Edinburgh School of sociology of scientific knowledge, are explored to bring out and to evaluate his main presuppositions and arguments. Barnes is highly critical of anthropologists' conception of scientific knowledge, rationality, truth, and their asymmetrical explanatory approach towards different belief‐systems. Likewise he rejects the prevalent View of science among sociologists of knowledge, and also their approach to explanation of knowledge or belief‐adoption. His (...)
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  11. Socialization of Epistemology: For a Better Relationship Between Epistemology and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Tetsuji Iseda - 2001 - Dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park
    The main theme of this dissertation is to explore how to establish a better relationship between sociological and philosophical investigations of science; how should epistemological considerations be used in sociological studies of scientific knowledge, and how should sociological findings be used in epistemological studies? To answer these questions, I review both sociological and social epistemological literatures on scientific knowledge, with more emphasis on the latter. On the sociological side, I point out that a large part of (...)
     
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  12.  16
    Conventionalism, Scientific Discovery and the Sociology of Knowledge.Angelo M. Petroni - 1993 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 7 (3):225 – 240.
    Abstract In this paper the basic aim of the so?called ?strong programme? in the sociology of knowledge is examined. The ?strong programme? is considered (and rightly so) as an extreme version of the anti?realist view of science. While the problem of scientific realism has normally been dealt with from the point of view of the ?context of justification? of theories, the paper focuses on the issues raised by law?discovery. In this context Herbert Simon's views about the existence (...)
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  13.  13
    Science, Rhetoric, and the Sociology of Knowledge: A Critique of Dascal's View of Scientific Controversies.Kanavillil Rajagopalan - 2002 - Manuscrito 25 (2):433-464.
    Dascal’s position on scientific controversies is submitted to a critical examination. It is pointed out that his distinction between knowledge and understanding, between ‘hard rationality’ and ‘soft rationality’ is unlikely to survive sustained critical probing. What is egregiously missing in his approach is a recognition of the role of so-called ‘sociology of knowledge’ in the way scientific controversies play out. It is argued that, insofar as they constitute pragmatic events, scientific controversies cannot be studied (...)
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  14.  46
    A Critique of Relativism in the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Si Sun - 2007 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (1):115-130.
    “The Strong Programme” is put forward as a metaphysical theory of sociology by the Edinburgh School (SSK) to study the social causes of knowledge. Barry Barnes and David Bloor are the proponents of the School. They call their programme “the Relativist View of Knowledge” and argue against rationalism in the philosophy of science. Does their relativist account of knowledge present a serious challenge to rationalism, which has dominated 20th century philosophy of science? I attempt to answer (...)
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  15. Realism, Reliabilism, and the 'Strong Programme' in the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jeff Kochan - 2008 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):21 – 38.
    In this essay, I respond to Tim Lewens's proposal that realists and Strong Programme theorists can find common ground in reliabilism. I agree with Lewens, but point to difficulties in his argument. Chief among these is his assumption that reliabilism is incompatible with the Strong Programme's principle of symmetry. I argue that the two are, in fact, compatible, and that Lewens misses this fact because he wrongly supposes that reliabilism entails naturalism. The Strong Programme can fully accommodate a reliabilism which (...)
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  16.  92
    Contrastive Explanation and the 'Strong Programme' in the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jeff Kochan - 2010 - Social Studies of Science 40 (1):127-44.
    In this essay, I address a novel criticism recently levelled at the Strong Programme by Nick Tosh and Tim Lewens. Tosh and Lewens paint Strong Programme theorists as trading on a contrastive form of explanation. With this, they throw valuable new light on the explanatory methods employed by the Strong Programme. However, as I shall argue, Tosh and Lewens run into trouble when they accuse Strong Programme theorists of unduly restricting the contrast space in which legitimate historical and sociological explanations (...)
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  17.  43
    Karl Mannheim and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: Toward a New Agenda.Dick Pels - 1996 - Sociological Theory 14 (1):30-48.
    In previous decades, a regrettable divorce has arisen between two currents of theorizing and research about knowledge and science: the Mannheimian and Wittgensteinian traditions. The radical impulse of the new social studies of science in the early 1970s was initiated not by followers of Mannheim, but by Wittgensteinians such as Kuhn, Bloor, and Collins. This paper inquires whether this Wittgensteinian program is not presently running into difficulties that might be resolved to some extent by reverting to a more traditional (...)
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  18.  19
    Interests, Folk Psychology and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Petri Ylikoski - 2004 - Philosophical Explorations 7 (3):265 – 279.
    This paper provides a conceptual analysis of the notion of interests as it is used in the social studies of science. After describing the theoretical background behind the Strong Program's adoption of the concept of interest, the paper outlines a reconstruction of the everyday notion of interest and argues that this same notion is used also by the sociologists of scientific knowledge. However, there are a couple of important differences between the everyday use of this notion and the (...)
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  19.  29
    New Economics of Science, Economics of Scientific Knowledge and Sociology of Science: The Case of Paul David.Matthieu Ballandonne - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (4):391-406.
    For a little more than twenty years, the terminology used in the economics of science has changed significantly with the development of expressions such as ?new economics of science? (NES) and ?economics of scientific knowledge? (ESK). This article seeks to shed light on the use of these different terminologies by studying the work of the economist of science Paul David. We aim to use his work as a case study in order to argue for a difference between NES (...)
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  20. Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: A Source Book.H. M. Collins (ed.) - 1982 - Bath University Press.
     
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  21.  49
    Here and Everywhere - Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Steven Shapin - 1995 - Annual Review of Sociology 21:289-321.
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  22.  78
    Truthlikeness with a Human Face: On Some Connections Between the Theory of Verisimilitude and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla - 2005 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 83 (1):361-369.
    Verisimilitude theorists (and many scientific realists) assume that science attempts to provide hypotheses with an increasing degree of closeness to the full truth; on the other hand, radical sociologists of science assert that flesh and bone scientists struggle to attain much more mundane goals (such as income, power, fame, and so on). This paper argues that both points of view can be made compatible, for (1) rational individuals only would be interested in engaging in a strong competition (such as (...)
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  23.  55
    On the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and its Philosophical Agenda.Michael Friedman - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (2):239-271.
  24. Truthlikeness with a Human Face: On Some Connections Between the Theory of Verisimilitude and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jesús Zamora Bonilla - 2005 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 83:361-369.
    Verisimilitude theorists assume that science attempts to provide hypotheses with an increasing degree of closeness to the full truth; on the other hand, radical sociologists of science assert that flesh and bone scientists struggle to attain much more mundane goals . This paper argues that both points of view can be made compatible, for rational individuals only would be interested in engaging in a strong competition if they knew in advance the rules under which their outcomes are to be assessed, (...)
     
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  25. Rule-Scepticism and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: The Bloor-Lynch Debate Revisited.Martin Kusch - 2004 - Social Studies of Science 34:571-591.
  26. What Does the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge Explain?: Or, When Epistemological Chickens Come Home to Roost.Paul A. Roth - 1994 - History of the Human Sciences 7 (1):95-108.
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  27. The Social and the Cognitive: Resources for the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.M. Nicolson - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (2):347-369.
  28.  7
    Science, Truth and History, Part I. Historiography, Relativism and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Nick Tosh - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (4):675-701.
  29.  7
    Science, Truth and History, Part II. Metaphysical Bolt-Holes for the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge?Nick Tosh - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):185-209.
  30.  18
    The Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: The Constructivist Thesis and Relativism.Paul Tibbetts - 1986 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 16 (1):39-57.
  31.  24
    Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.David Bloor - 2004 - In Ilkka Niiniluoto, Matti Sintonen & Jan Wolenski (eds.), Handbook of Epistemology. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 919--962.
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  32.  38
    Science Made Up: Constructivist Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.D. Stump - unknown
    Part of the work for this paper was done during the tenure of a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. I am grateful for financial support provided by the National Science Foundation, Grant #BNS-8011494, and for the assistance of the staff of the Center. I also want to thank David Bloor, Stephen Downes, David Hull and Andy Pickering for offering good advice and criticism, some of which I have heeded.
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  33.  12
    The Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: Can We Ever Get It Straight?Peter T. Manicas & Alan Rosenberg - 1988 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (1):51–76.
  34. Epistemology and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.D. M. Clarke - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (2):177-183.
     
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  35.  14
    The Possibility of a Mathematical Sociology of Scientific Communication.Loet Leydesdorff - 1996 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 27 (2):243-265.
    The focus on discourse and communication in the recent sociology of scientific knowledge offers new perspectives for an integration of qualitative and quantitative approaches in science studies. The common point of interest is the question of how reflexive communication systems communicate. The elaboration of the mathematical theory of communication into a theory of potentially self-organizing entropical systems enables us to distinguish the various layers of communication, and to specify the dynamic changes in these configurations over time. For (...)
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  36.  19
    A Mannheim for All Seasons: Bloor, Merton, and the Roots of the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.David Kaiser - 1998 - Science in Context 11 (1).
  37.  5
    Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and Scientific Education: Part I.Peter Slezak - 1994 - Science & Education 3 (3):265-294.
  38. The Controversy Between Biometricions and Mendelions: A Test Case for the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.N. Roll-Hansen - 1980 - Social Science Information 19 (3):501-517.
  39.  30
    Sociology of Knowledge and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Andrew Pickering - 1997 - Social Epistemology 11 (2):187 – 192.
  40.  47
    Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Zaheer Baber - 1992 - Theory and Society 21 (1):105-119.
  41.  1
    Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and Science Education Part 2: Laboratory Life Under the Microscope.Peter Slezak - 1994 - Science and Education 3 (4):329-355.
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  42.  17
    Joseph Ben-David's Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Gad Freudenthal - 1987 - Minerva 25 (1-2):135-149.
  43.  36
    Darwin, Social Theory, and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Nancey Murphy - 1999 - Zygon 34 (4):573-600.
  44.  6
    Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and Science Education Part 2: Laboratory Life Under the Microscope.Peter Slezak - 1994 - Science & Education 3 (4):329-355.
  45.  3
    Comment: All Pumped Up About the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Trevor Pinch - 2017 - Isis 108 (1):127-129.
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  46.  13
    Rationality and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Peter Halfpenny - 1991 - Sociological Theory 9 (2):212-215.
  47.  1
    Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: A Source Book. H. M. Collins.Ian Inkster - 1984 - Isis 75 (3):577-578.
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  48. Symposium on "Computer Discovery and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge".David Edge & Peter Slezak - 1989 - Sage Publications.
     
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  49.  33
    But is It Sociology of Knowledge? Wilhelm Jerusalem's “Sociology of Cognition” in Context.Thomas Uebel - 2012 - Studies in East European Thought 64 (1-2):5-37.
    This paper considers the charge that—contrary to the current widespread assumption accompanying the near-universal neglect of his work—Wilhelm Jerusalem (1854–1923) cannot count as one of the founders of the sociology of (scientific) knowledge. In order to elucidate the matter, Jerusalem’s “sociology of cognition” is here reconstructed in the context of his own work in psychology and philosophy as well as in the context of the work of some predecessors and contemporaries. It is argued that while it (...)
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  50.  4
    David Turnbull. Masons, Tricksters, and Cartographers: Comparative Studies in the Sociology of Scientific and Indigenous Knowledge. X + 263 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index.Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers, 2000. $24, £14.99. [REVIEW]Pamela O. Long - 2002 - Isis 93 (1):165-166.
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