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  1. Giacomo Borbone & Krzysztof Brzechczyn (eds.) (2016). Idealization Xiv: Models in Science. Brill | Rodopi.
    The book "Idealization XIV: Models in Science" offers a detailed ontological, epistemological and historical account of the role of models in scientific practice. The volume contains contributions of different international scholars who developed many aspects of the use of idealizations and models both in the natural and the social sciences. This volume is particularly relevant because it offers original contributions concerning one of the main topic in philosophy of science: the role of models in such branches of the sciences and (...)
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  2. Marcel Boumans & Mary S. Morgan (2001). Ceteris Paribus Conditions: Materiality and the Application of Economic Theories. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):11-26.
  3. Nancy Cartwright (2010). Reply to Steel and Pearl Hunting Causes and Using Them: Approaches in Philosophy and Economics , Nancy Cartwright. Cambridge University Press, 2008, X + 270 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):87-94.
  4. Danny Frederick, What is Wrong with Ceteris-Paribus Law-Statements?
    It is often contended that the special sciences, and even fundamental physics, make use of ceteris-paribus law-statements. Yet there are general concerns that such law-statements are vacuous or untestable or unscientific. I consider two main kinds of ceteris-paribus law-statement. I argue that neither kind is vacuous, that one of the kinds is untestable, that both kinds may count as scientific to the extent that they form parts of conjunctions that imply novel falsifiable statements which survive testing, but that one kind (...)
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  5. Enrique Guerra-Pujol (2014). The Evolutionary Path of the Law. [REVIEW] Indonesian Journal of International and Comparative Law 1 (3):878-890.
    What lessons can legal scholars learn from the life and work of W. D. "Bill" Hamilton, a lifelong student of nature? From my small corner of the legal Academia, three aspects of Bill Hamilton’s work in evolutionary biology stand out in particular: (i) Hamilton’s simple and beautiful model of social behavior in terms of costs and benefits; (ii) his fruitful collaboration with the political theorist Robert Axelrod and their unexpected yet elegant solution of the Prisoner’s Dilemma, an important game or (...)
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  6. Frank Hahn (1996). Rerum Cognoscere Causas. Economics and Philosophy 12 (2):183.
    Professor Hausman has written an interesting and instructive book. Though I am by no means favourably disposed to methodology for economists,, I found reading Hausman enjoyable and I came away having learned things worth learning. But not all is well, largely because Hausman is a philosopher first and an economist a poor second. There are also important questions where one would have expected philosophic help which are not asked at all.
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  7. M. Hammersley (2011). On Becker's Studies of Marijuana Use as an Example of Analytic Induction. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (4):535-566.
    Analytic induction (AI) is an interpretation of scientific method that emerged in early twentieth-century sociology and still has some influence today. Among the studies often cited as examples are Becker’s articles on marijuana use. While these have been given less attention than the work of Lindesmith on opiate addiction and Cressey on financial trust violation, Becker’s work has distinctive features. Furthermore, it raises some important and interesting issues that relate not only to AI but to social scientific explanation more generally. (...)
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  8. O. Hamouda (1996). Review of Michel Zouboulakis's La Science Economique D la Recherche des Ses Fondements: La Tradition Epistemologique Ricardienne 1826-1891. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 12:234-239.
  9. D. Wade Hands (1987). Human Agency and Language: Philosophical Papers I, Charles Taylor, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985, 294 Pages.Philosophy and the Human Sciences: Philosophical Papers II, Charles Taylor, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985, 337 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 3 (1):172.
  10. Lukasz Hardt (2016). The Recent Critique of Theoretical Economics: A Methodologically Informed Investigation. Journal of Economic Issues 50 (1):269-287.
    My purpose is to appraise the recent critique of theoretical economics by applying the methodological perspective. Therefore, I start by identifying the main lines of criticism raised against theoretical economics in the aftermath of the post-2008 global economic crisis: namely, the voices criticizing economics for its unrealistic models, excessive mathematization, and overconfidence in its theoretical claims. First, I show that these issues are interconnected and should be jointly analyzed. Next, I investigate these lines of critique from the perspective provided by (...)
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  11. Kevin D. Hoover (1990). Nature's Capacities and Their Measurement, Nancy Cartwright. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989, X + 268 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 6 (2):309.
  12. Ian Hunt (2001). How the Laws of Economics Lie. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):119–133.
  13. Harold Kincaid (2003). The Dappled World: A Study of the Boundaries of Science, Nancy Cartwright. Cambridge University Press, 1999, IX + 240 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 19 (1):167-170.
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  14. Gregory M. Mikkelson (2003). Ecological Kinds and Ecological Laws. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1390-1400.
    Ecologists typically invoke "law-like" generalizations, ranging over "structural" and/or "functional" kinds, in order to explain generalizations about "historical" kinds (such as biological taxa)rather than vice versa. This practice is justified, since structural and functional kinds tend to correlate better with important ecological phenomena than do historical kinds. I support these contentions with three recent case studies. In one sense, therefore, ecology is, and should be, more nomothetic, or law-oriented, than idiographic, or historically oriented. This conclusion challenges several recent philosophical claims (...)
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  15. Piet-Hein van Eeghen (1996). Towards a Methodology of Tendencies. Journal of Economic Methodology 3 (2):261-284.
    The paper attempts to think through some aspects of a methodology for tendencies, taking Menger as an important source of inspiration. The contrast between laws and tendencies is emphasized, whereby laws posit necessary connections between cause and effect and refer to historically specific events and tendencies describe loose connections between cause and effect and refer to broad Hayekian patterns of events. Emphasis is placed on the importance of isolating as well as ?patterning? abstraction for the social sciences, which is traced (...)
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  16. Jean-Philippe Vergne & Rodolphe Durand (2010). The Missing Link Between the Theory and Empirics of Path Dependence: Conceptual Clarification, Testability Issue, Methodological Implications. Journal of Management Studies 47:736-759.
    Path dependence is a central construct in social sciences, used to describe a mechanism that connects the past and the future in an abstract way. However, across disciplines, it remains unclear why path dependence sometimes occurs and sometimes not, why it sometimes lead to inefficient outcomes and sometimes not, how it differs from mere increasing returns, and how scholars can empirically support their claims on path dependence. Hence, path dependence is not yet a theory since it does not causally relate (...)
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