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  1. Jonathan Aldred (2009). The Skeptical Economist: Revealing the Ethics Inside Economics. Earthscan.
    Introduction : ethical economics? -- The sovereign consumer -- Two myths about economic growth -- The politics of pay -- Happiness -- Pricing life and nature -- New worlds of money : public services and beyond -- Conclusion.
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  2. Anna Alexandrova (2012). Values and the Science of Well-Being : A Recipe for Mixing. In Harold Kincaid (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Social Science. Oxford University Press.
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  3. Deirdre McCloskey Amariglio (2009). Art, Fleeing From Capitalism : A Slightly Disputatious Interview/Conversation. In Jack Amariglio, Joseph W. Childers & Stephen Cullenberg (eds.), Sublime Economy: On the Intersection of Art and Economics. Routledge.
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  4. Jack Amariglio (2009). Tracing the Economic : Modern Art's Construction of Economic Value. In Jack Amariglio, Joseph W. Childers & Stephen Cullenberg (eds.), Sublime Economy: On the Intersection of Art and Economics. Routledge.
  5. Jack Amariglio, Joseph W. Childers & Stephen Cullenberg (eds.) (2009). Sublime Economy: On the Intersection of Art and Economics. Routledge.
    "The premise of this collection is that despite this perceptual sharing, "sublime economy" has yet to be investigated in a purely cross-disciplinary way.
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  6. S. E. N. Amartya (2005). Why Exactly is Commitment Important for Rationality? Economics and Philosophy 21 (1):5-14.
    Gary Becker and others have done important work to broaden the content of self interest, but have not departed from seeing rationality in terms of the exclusive pursuit of self-interest. One reason why committed behavior is important is that a person can have good reason to pursue objectives other than self interest maximization (no matter how broadly it is construed). Indeed, one can also follow rules of behavior that go beyond the pursuit of one's own goals, even if the goals (...)
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  7. Ash Amin & Joanne Roberts (eds.) (2008). Community, Economic Creativity, and Organization. OUP Oxford.
    It has long been an interest of researchers in economics, sociology, organization studies, and economic geography to understand how firms innovate. Most recently, this interest has begun to examine the micro-processes of work and organization that sustain social creativity, emphasizing the learning and knowing through action when social actors and technologies come together in 'communities of practice'; everyday interactions of common purpose and mutual obligation. These communities are said to spark both incremental and radical innovation. -/- In the book, leading (...)
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  8. Elizabeth Anderson (2000). Beyond Homo Economicus: New Developments in Theories of Social Norms. Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (2):170–200.
  9. Elizabeth Anderson (1990). The Ethical Limitations of the Market. Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):179-.
  10. Joel Anderson (2010). Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness, Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein. Yale University Press, 2008. X + 293 Pages. [Paperback Edition, Penguin, 2009, 320 Pages.]. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):369-376.
  11. Jonny Anomaly (2015). Public Goods and Government Action. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594X13505414.
    It is widely agreed that one of the core functions of government is to supply public goods that markets either fail to provide or cannot provide efficiently. I will suggest that arguments for government provision of public goods require fundamental moral judgments in addition to the usual economic considerations about the relative efficacy of markets and governments in supplying them. While philosophers and policymakers owe a debt of gratitude to economists for developing the theory of public goods, the link between (...)
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  12. David Archard (1998). Contested Commodities: The Trouble with Trade in Sex, Children, Body Parts, and Other Things, Margaret Jane Radin. Harvard University Press, 1996, Xiv + 279 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 14 (02):362-.
  13. Richard J. Arneson (1996). Value in Ethics and Economics, Elizabeth Anderson. Harvard University Press, 1993. 246 + Xvi Pages. Economics and Philosophy 12 (01):89-.
  14. John R. Atherton, Elaine L. Graham & Ian Steedman (eds.) (2010). The Practices of Happiness: Political Economy, Religion and Wellbeing. Routledge.
    These essays explore the religious dimensions to a number of key features of well-being, including marriage, crime and rehabilitation, work, inequality, mental ...
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  15. N. Emrah Aydinonat (2010). Is Spontaneous Order a Value-Free Descriptive Methodological Tool? Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (4):448-452.
  16. Andy Bahn & John Gowdy (2003). Economics Weak and Strong: Ecological Economics and Human Survival. World Futures 59 (3 & 4):253 – 262.
    Mounting evidence suggests that the human impact on the planet is reaching the point where the Earth's ecosystems will not be able to support the level of human occupation. The global economy also seems to be generating income disparities that threaten the social stability of even the most developed economies. Although both these trends are rooted in the operation of the global market economy, standard economics has surprisingly little to offer in the way of policies that might allow us to (...)
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  17. C. Edwin Baker (1975). The Ideology of the Economic Analysis of Law. Philosophy and Public Affairs 5 (1):3-48.
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  18. Charles R. Beitz (1986). Resources, Values and Development. Amartya Sen, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1984, 547 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 2 (02):282-.
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  19. C. Bicchieri (2010). Norms, Preferences, and Conditional Behavior. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 9 (3):297-313.
    This article addresses several issues raised by Nichols, Gintis, and Skyrms and Zollman in their comments on my book, The Grammar of Society: The Nature and Dynamics of Social Norms . In particular, I explore the relation between social and personal norms, what an adequate game-theoretic representation of norms should be, and what models of norms emergence should tell us about the formation of normative expectations.
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  20. C. Bicchieri, E. Xiao & R. Muldoon (2011). Trustworthiness is a Social Norm, but Trusting is Not. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 10 (2):170-187.
    Previous literature has demonstrated the important role that trust plays in developing and maintaining well-functioning societies. However, if we are to learn how to increase levels of trust in society, we must first understand why people choose to trust others. One potential answer to this is that people view trust as normative: there is a social norm for trusting that imposes punishment for noncompliance. To test this, we report data from a survey with salient rewards to elicit people’s attitudes regarding (...)
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  21. Cristina Bicchieri & Alex K. Chavez (2013). Norm Manipulation, Norm Evasion: Experimental Evidence. Economics and Philosophy 29 (2):175-198.
    Using an economic bargaining game, we tested for the existence of two phenomena related to social norms, namely norm manipulation and norm evasion – the deliberate, private violation of a social norm. We found that the manipulation of a norm of fairness was characterized by a self-serving bias in beliefs about what constituted normatively acceptable behaviour, so that an individual who made an uneven bargaining offer not only genuinely believed it was fair, but also believed that recipients found it fair, (...)
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  22. John Douglas Bishop (2012). The Elephant in the Room: On the Absence of Corporations in Bernard Hodgson's Economics as a Moral Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):27-35.
    In his book Economics as a Moral Science , Bernard Hodgson argues that economics is not value neutral as is often claimed, but is a value-laden discipline. In the long argument for this in his book, Hodgson never discusses or even mentions corporations. This article explains that corporations are absent from Hodgson’s discussion because he considers only the consumption side of general equilibrium theory (GET), and it shows that if Hodgson had included corporations and the production side, his overall argument (...)
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  23. Luc Bovens & Marc Fleurbaey (2012). Evaluating Life or Death Prospects. Economics and Philosophy 28 (2):217-249.
    We consider a special set of risky prospects in which the outcomes are either life or death (or, more generally, binary utilities). There are various alternatives to the utilitarian objective of minimizing the expected loss of lives in such prospects. We start off with the two-person case with independent risks and construct taxonomies of ex ante and ex post evaluations for such prospects. We examine the relationship between the ex ante and the ex post in this restrictive framework: There are (...)
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  24. David Braybrooke (1990). The Standard of Living, Amartya Sen Et Al. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987, Xiv + 125 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):339-.
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  25. Geoffrey Brennan (1998). Economic Analysis and Moral Philosophy, David M. Hausman and Michael S. McPherson. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1996, Xii + 249 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 14 (02):339-.
  26. Geoffrey Brennan & Daniel Moseley (forthcoming). Economics and Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    We identify three points of intersection between economics and ethics: the ethics of economics, ethics in economics and ethics out of economics. These points of intersection reveal three types of conversation between economists and moral philosophers that have produced, and may continue to produce, fruitful exchange between the disciplines.
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  27. D. Brock (2011). Cost-Effectiveness and Disability Discrimination – Addendum. Economics and Philosophy 27 (1):97-98.
  28. J. Broome (1991). Utility-Ideas and Terminology-Reply. Economics and Philosophy 7 (2):285-287.
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  29. John Broome (2007). Replies. Economics and Philosophy 23 (1):115-124.
  30. John Broome (2007). Reply to Jones-Lee. Economics and Philosophy 23 (3):385-387.
  31. Campbell Brown (2005). Priority or Sufficiency …or Both? Economics and Philosophy 21 (2):199-220.
    Prioritarianism is the view that we ought to give priority to benefiting those who are worse off. Sufficientism, on the other hand, is the view that we ought to give priority to benefiting those who are not sufficiently well off. This paper concerns the relative merits of these two views; in particular, it examines an argument advanced by Roger Crisp to the effect that sufficientism is the superior of the two. My aim is to show that Crisp's argument is unsound. (...)
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  32. Campbell Brown (2003). Giving Up Levelling Down. Economics and Philosophy 19 (1):111-134.
  33. Vivienne Brown (1995). Reading Adam Smith's Texts on Morals and Wealth. Economics and Philosophy 11 (02):344-.
    In his Comment , Richard Arlen Kleer accepts much of the argument in my article (Brown, 1991) but insists that I have (Kleer, 1993). Kleer agrees that there is a moral hierarchy in Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments (TMS) where benevolence and self-command are ranked higher than justice and prudence, but he is uneasy with the conclusion that economic activity and the pursuit of gain are activities and insists that they do have a significant moral standing. In addition, although (...)
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  34. Vivienne Brown (1991). Signifying Voices: Reading the “Adam Smith Problem”. Economics and Philosophy 7 (02):187-.
  35. Luigino Bruni & Robert Sugden (2009). Fraternity, Intrinsic Motivation and Sacrifice: A Reply to Gui and Nelson. Economics and Philosophy 25 (2):195-198.
    This paper responds to Gui and Nelson's separate comments on our paper , which analysed sociality in markets as joint commitment to mutual assistance. We argue that our analysis is fundamentally different both from Nelson's analysis (a mixture of self-interested and intrinsic motivations) and from that provided by theories of warm glow or guilt aversion, as discussed by Gui. We agree with Gui that, in initiating and maintaining cooperative relationships, individuals sometimes incur personal costs to benefit others without any certainty (...)
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  36. Karl Brunner (1985). Comment on" Ideology and Analysis in Macroeconomics. In Peter Koslowski (ed.), Economics and Philosophy. J.C.B. Mohr. 208.
  37. Allen E. Buchanan (1985). Ethics, Efficiency, and the Market. Rowman & Allanheld.
    This is a systematic evaluation of the main arguments for and against the market as an instrument of social organization, balancing efficiency and justice .
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  38. Ayşe Buğra & Gürol Irzik (1999). Human Needs, Consumption, and Social Policy. Economics and Philosophy 15 (02):187-.
  39. Krister Bykvist (2007). Satisficing and Maximizing: Moral Theorists on Practical Reason, Edited by Michael Byron. Cambridge University Press, 2004, 245 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):240-245.
  40. Paul Calcott (2000). New on Paternalism. Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):315-321.
    Individuals often seem to misjudge their own interests. One reason is inadequate information. Other reasons are failures of reasoning and volition. These reasons have all been construed as paternalist motives for the state to intervene. But in a recent article in this journal, New (1999), criticizes earlier accounts of paternalism. He argues that imperfect information constitutes a standard form of market failure, and consequently policies that respond to it do not require a paternalist motivation. The purpose of this note is (...)
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  41. Bruce Caldwell (1994). Hayek's Scientific Subjectivism. Economics and Philosophy 10 (02):305-.
  42. Benjamin N. Cardozo (1930). The Paradoxes of Legal Sciences. New York, Columbia University Press.
    Introduction. Rest and motion. Stability and progress.--The meaning of justice. The science of values.--The equilibration of interests. Cause and effect. The individual and society. Liberty and government.--Liberty and government. Conclusion.
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  43. Peter Carruthers (2002). Human Nature and the Limits of Science, John Dupré. Clarendon Press, 2001, 211 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 18 (2):351-385.
  44. Sergio Caruso (2012). Homo Œconomicus: Paradigma, Critiche, Revisioni: Saggio Sui (Discutibili) Presupposti Antropologici Della Razionalità Utilitaria E Sulle Implicazioni Ideologiche Della Loro Entificazione. Firenze University Press.
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  45. Joseph W. Childers & Stephen E. Cullenberg (2009). Use, Value, Aesthetics : Gambling with Difference/Speculating with Value. In Jack Amariglio, Joseph W. Childers & Stephen Cullenberg (eds.), Sublime Economy: On the Intersection of Art and Economics. Routledge.
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  46. Adam J. Chmielewski (1999). Life After Liberalism. In I. C. Jarvie & Sandra Pralong (eds.), Popper's Open Society After Fifty Years: The Continuing Relevance of Karl Popper. Routledge.
  47. André Clark (2003). Methodological Individualism, Cognitive Homogeneity and Environmental Determinism. Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (1):79-85.
    A study encompassing a number of UK Universities identified a widespread implicit environmental determinism employed in the teaching of Economics to business studies undergraduates. In this paper the author argues that this bias is an inevitable by-product of the methodological individualism adopted within mainstream economics. The author concludes that methodological individualism is, therefore, flawed both as a mechanism for accessing the reality of the business world and the power of firms within it, and for teaching others about that reality, particularly (...)
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  48. Flavio Comim & Miriam Teschl (2006). Introduction: Capabilities and Identity. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (3):293-298.
  49. W. Cunningham (1878). Political Economy as a Moral Science. Mind 3 (11):369-383.
  50. Partha Dasgupta (2005). What Do Economists Analyze and Why: Values or Facts? Economics and Philosophy 21 (2):221-278.
    Social thinkers frequently remind us that people differ in their views on what constitutes personal well-being, but that even when they don't differ, they disagree over the extent to which one person's well-being can be permitted to be traded off against another's. In this paper I show, by offering an account of the development of development economics, that in professional debates on social policy, economists speak or write as though they agree on values but differ on their reading of facts. (...)
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