Search results for 'Joel Hunter' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joel Hunter, Time Travel. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 240.0
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  2. Allison Hunter (2013). Images by Alison Hunter. Angelaki 18 (1):99-106.score: 120.0
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  3. J. Hunter (2013). Presuppositional Indexicals. Journal of Semantics 30 (3):381-421.score: 60.0
    Kaplanian, two-dimensional theories secure rigidity for indexicals by positing special contexts and semantic mechanisms reserved only for indexicals. The result is a deep and unexplained chasm between expressions that depend on the extra-linguistic context and expressions that depend on the discourse context. Theories that treat indexicals as anaphoric, presuppositional expressions (e.g., Zeevat 1999; Roberts 2002; Hunter & Asher 2005; Maier 2006, 2009) have the potential to be more minimal and general than Kaplanian, two-dimensional theories—the mechanism of presupposition, unlike that (...)
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  4. Lynette Hunter (1999). Critiques of Knowing: Situated Textualities in Science, Computing, and the Arts. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Critiques of Knowing explores what happens to science and computing when we think of them as texts. Lynette Hunter elegantly weaves together such vast areas of thought as rhetoric, politics, AI, computing, feminism, science studies, aesthetics and epistemology. This book shows us that what we need is a radical shake-up of approaches to the arts if the critiques of science and computing are to come to any fruition.
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  5. Ian Hunter (2001/2006). Rival Enlightenments: Civil and Metaphysical Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Rival Enlightenments is a major reinterpretation of early modern German intellectual history. Ian Hunter treats the civil philosophy of Pufendorf and Thomasius and the metaphysical philosophy of Leibniz and Kant as rival intellectual cultures or paideia, thereby challenging all histories premised on Kant's supposed reconciliation and transcendence of the field. This landmark study argues that the marginalization of civil philosophy in post-Kantian philosophical history may itself illustrate the continuing struggle between the rival enlightenments. Combining careful scholarship with vivid polemic, (...)
     
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  6. David Hunter (2007). Contextualism, Skepticism and Objectivity. In R. Stainton & C. Viger (eds.), Compositionality. Context, and Semantic Values.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I try to make sense of the idea that true knowledge attributions characterize something that is more valuable than true belief and that survives even if, as Contextualism implies, contextual changes make it no longer identifiable by a knowledge attribution. I begin by sketching a familiar, pragmatic picture of assertion that helps us to understand and predict how the words “S knows that P” can be used to draw different epistemic distinctions in different contexts. I then argue (...)
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  7. David Hunter (2003). Is Thinking an Action? Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):133-148.score: 30.0
    I argue that entertaining a proposition is not an action. Such events do not have intentional explanations and cannot be evaluated as rational or not. In these respects they contrast with assertions and compare well with perceptual events. One can control what one thinks by doing something, most familiarly by reciting a sentence. But even then the event of entertaining the proposition is not an action, though it is an event one has caused to happen, much as one might cause (...)
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  8. Daniel Hunter & Reed Richter (1978). Counterfactuals and Newcomb's Paradox. Synthese 39 (2):249 - 261.score: 30.0
    In their development of causal decision theory, Allan Gibbard and William Harper advocate a particular method for calculating the expected utility of an action, a method based upon the probabilities of certain counterfactuals. Gibbard and Harper then employ their method to support a two-box solution to Newcomb’s paradox. This paper argues against some of Gibbard and Harper’s key claims concerning the truth-values and probabilities of counterfactuals involved in expected utility calculations, thereby disputing their analysis of Newcomb’s Paradox. If we are (...)
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  9. David Hunter (2008). Self-Consciousness - by Sebastian Rödl. Philosophical Books 49 (3):272-274.score: 30.0
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  10. David hunter (2005). Soames and Widescopism. Philosophical Studies 123 (3):231 - 241.score: 30.0
    Widescopism, as I call it, holds that names are synonymous with descriptions that are required to take wide scope over modal adverbs. Scott Soames has recently argued that Widescopism is false. He identifies an argument that is valid but which, he claims, a defender of Widescopism must say has true premises and a false conclusion. I argue, first, that a defender of Widescopism need not in fact say that the target arguments conclusion is false. Soames argument that she must confuses, (...)
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  11. David Hunter (2008). Belief and Self-Consciousness. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):673 – 693.score: 30.0
    This paper is about what is distinctive about first-person beliefs. I discuss several sets of puzzling cases of first-person belief. The first focus on the relation between belief and action, while the second focus on the relation of belief to subjectivity. I argue that in the absence of an explanation of the dispositional difference, individuating such beliefs more finely than truth conditions merely marks the difference. I argue that the puzzles reveal a difference in the ways that I am disposed (...)
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  12. David Hunter (2001). Mind-Brain Identity and the Nature of States. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (3):366 – 376.score: 30.0
  13. David Hunter (1997). Understanding, Justification and the a Priori. Philosophical Studies 87 (2):119-141.score: 30.0
    What I wish to consider here is how understanding something is related to the justification of beliefs about what it means. Suppose, for instance, that S understands the name “Clinton” and has a justified belief that it names Clinton. How is S’s understanding related to that belief’s justification? Or suppose that S understands the sentence “Clinton is President”, or Jones’ assertive utterance of it, and has a justified belief that that sentence expresses the proposition that Clinton is President, or that (...)
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  14. Geoffrey Hunter (1971). Metalogic: An Introduction to the Metatheory of Standard First Order Logic. Berkeley,University of California Press.score: 30.0
    This work makes available to readers without specialized training in mathematics complete proofs of the fundamental metatheorems of standard (i.e., basically ...
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  15. Paul Pietroski, Jeffrey Lidz, Tim Hunter & Justin Halberda (2009). The Meaning of 'Most': Semantics, Numerosity and Psychology. Mind and Language 24 (5):554-585.score: 30.0
    The meaning of 'most' can be described in many ways. We offer a framework for distinguishing semantic descriptions, interpreted as psychological hypotheses that go beyond claims about sentential truth conditions, and an experiment that tells against an attractive idea: 'most' is understood in terms of one-to-one correspondence. Adults evaluated 'Most of the dots are yellow', as true or false, on many trials in which yellow dots and blue dots were displayed for 200 ms. Displays manipulated the ease of using a (...)
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  16. David Hunter (2007). Common Ground and Modal Disagreement. In H. V. Hanson (ed.), Dissensus and the Search for Common Ground. 134-143.score: 30.0
    The common ground in an inquiry consists of what the participants agree on, at least for the sake of the inquiry. The relations between the factual and linguistic components of common ground are notoriously difficult to trace. I clarify them by exploring how modal disagreements – disagreements about how things might be – interact with the linguistic and the factual common ground. I argue that modal agreement is essential to common ground of any kind.
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  17. Geoffrey Hunter (1962). Hume on Is and Ought. Philosophy 37 (140):148 - 152.score: 30.0
  18. David Hunter (2001). Knowledge and Understanding. Mind and Language 16 (5):542–546.score: 30.0
    Some philosophical proposals seem to die hard. In a recent paper, Jason Stanley has worked to resurrect the description theory of reference, at least as it might apply to natural kind terms like ‘elm’ (Stanley, 1999). The theory’s founding idea is that to understand ‘elm’ one must know a uniquely identifying truth about elms. Famously, Hilary Putnam showed that ordinary users of ‘elm’ may understand it while lacking such knowledge, and may even be unable to distinguish elms from beeches (Putnam, (...)
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  19. J. F. M. Hunter (1981). Wittgenstein on Seeing and Seeing As. Philosophical Investigations 4 (2):33-49.score: 30.0
    The article is an interpretation of about the first half of chapter xi of part ii of "philosophical investigations". Wittgenstein is treated as having the single aim of arguing down the massive temptation to suppose that the expression 'to see...As...', And such similar expressions as 'to recognize', Record the occurrence of an experience distinct from the experience of simply seeing the object seen as or recognized. Ways are suggested of making a kind of sense of most of the very perplexing (...)
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  20. Geoffrey Hunter (1995). Quine's 'Two Dogmas of Empiricism'. Philosophical Investigations 18 (4):305-328.score: 30.0
    This is a critical examination of Quine's "Two Dogmas" that leaves nothing much of Quine's paper still standing. It concludes with a short study of a bit of bad work in philosophy that results from following the doctrines of "Two Dogmas".
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  21. Daniel Hunter (1994). Act Utilitarianism and Dynamic Deliberation. Erkenntnis 41 (1):1 - 35.score: 30.0
    Coordination problems, problems in which each agent's expected utility depends upon what other agents do, pose a problem for act utilitarianism. When the agents are act utilitarians and know of each other that they are so, they seem unable to achieve optimal outcomes in certain coordination problems. I examine various ways the act utilitarian might attempt to solve this problem, where act utilitarianism is interpreted within the framework of subjective expected utility theory. In particular, a new method for computing expected (...)
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  22. J. F. M. Hunter (1983). The Difference Between Dreaming and Being Awake. Mind 92 (January):80-93.score: 30.0
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  23. David Hunter, Tis but a Scratch: The Human Tissue Act and the Use of Tissue for Research, Issues for Research Ethics Committees.score: 30.0
    The Human Tissue Act 2004 in the United Kingdom clearly represents not a principled approach but instead a compromise, a pragmatic approach which balances several different ethical considerations against each other. In regards to the use of tissue in research it has left much of the more difficult decisions to be made by research ethics committees on a case by case basis. In particular it is now the role of research ethics committees to decide whether research can be carried out (...)
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  24. Geoffrey Hunter (1995). The Churchlands' Eliminative Materialism. Philosophical Investigations 18 (1):13-30.score: 30.0
    This paper demolishes the Churchlands' arguments for their Eliminative Materialism and casts doubt on the logical possibility of their thesis. In passing, the paper draws attention to a mistake in history of science made in one of the arguments.
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  25. David Hunter (1998). Understanding and Belief. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (3):559-580.score: 30.0
    A natural view is that linguistic understanding is a source of justification or evidence: that beliefs about the meaning of a text or speech act are prima facie justified when based on states of understanding. Neglect of this view is largely due to the widely held assumption that understanding a text or speech act consists in knowledge or belief. It is argued that this assumption rests, in part, on confusing occurrent states of understanding and dispositions to understand. It is then (...)
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  26. Kathryn Hunter (1996). “Don't Think Zebras”: Uncertainty, Interpretation, and the Place of Paradox in Clinical Education. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (3).score: 30.0
    Working retrospectively in an uncertain field of knowledge, physicians are engaged in an interpretive practice that is guided by couterweighted, competing, sometimes paradoxical maxims. When you hear hoofbeats, don't think zebras, is the chief of these, the epitome of medicine's practical wisdom, its hermeneutic rule. The accumulated and contradictory wisdom distilled in clinical maxims arises necessarily from the case-based nature of medical practice and the narrative rationality that good practice requires. That these maxims all have their opposites enforces in students (...)
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  27. Daniel Hunter (1996). On the Relation Between Categorical and Probabilistic Belief. Noûs 30 (1):75-98.score: 30.0
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  28. R. L. Hunter (2004). Plato's Symposium. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the (...)
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  29. Conal Condren, Stephen Gaukroger & Ian Hunter (eds.) (2006). The Philosopher in Early Modern Europe: The Nature of a Contested Identity. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    In this groundbreaking collection of essays the history of philosophy appears in a new light, not as reason's progressive discovery of its universal conditions, but as a series of unreconciled disputes over the proper way to conduct oneself as a philosopher. By shifting focus from the philosopher as proxy for the universal subject of reason to the philosopher as a special persona arising from rival forms of self-cultivation, philosophy is approached in terms of the social office and intellectual deportment of (...)
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  30. David Hunter (2003). Gabriel Segal's a Slim Book About Narrow Content. Noûs 37 (4):724–745.score: 30.0
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  31. Graeme Hunter (2004). Spinoza on Miracles. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 56 (1):41 - 51.score: 30.0
    Spinoza is supposed to have denied the existence of miracles. I argue that instead of denying them he offers his readers a way of understanding miracles within his own metaphysical system in which God and nature are identified. I then offer some historical conjectures as to why his view has been misunderstood so often and for so long.
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  32. Graeme Hunter (2009). Cicero's Neglected Argument From Design. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):235-245.score: 30.0
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  33. David Hunter (2003). Gabriel Segal, a Slim Book About Narrow Content(Mit Press, 2000), 177 Pp. [REVIEW] Noûs 37 (4):724-745.score: 30.0
    The Mind-Body problem is the problem of saying how a person’s mental states and events relate to his bodily ones. How does Oscar’s believing that water is cold relate to the states of his body? Is it itself a bodily state, perhaps a state of his brain or nervous system? If not, does it nonetheless depend on such states? Or is his believing that water is cold independent of his bodily states? And, crucially, what are the notions of dependence and (...)
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  34. Graeme Hunter (2009). The Best of All Possible Worlds: A Story of Philosophers, God, and Evil (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 626-627.score: 30.0
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  35. J. F. M. Hunter (1971). Some Questions About Dreaming. Mind 80 (January):70-92.score: 30.0
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  36. J. F. M. Hunter (1990). Wittgenstein on Words as Instruments: Lessons in Philosophical Psychology. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 30.0
    Parti INTRODUCTION Wittgenstein sometimes suggested looking on words as instruments, for example in the following passages from ...
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  37. J. F. M. Hunter (1980). Wittgenstein on Language and Games. Philosophy 55 (213):293 - 302.score: 30.0
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  38. J. F. M. Hunter (1963). Conscience. Mind 72 (287):309-334.score: 30.0
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  39. Bruce Hunter (1999). Knowledge and Design. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (2):309-334.score: 30.0
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  40. David Hunter & James Wilson (2010). Research Exceptionalism. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):45-54.score: 30.0
    Research involving human subjects is much more stringently regulated than many other nonresearch activities that appear to be at least as risky. A number of prominent figures now argue that research is overregulated. We argue that the reasons typically offered to justify the present system of research regulation fail to show that research should be subject to more stringent regulation than other equally risky activities. However, there are three often overlooked reasons for thinking that research should be treated as a (...)
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  41. G. Don Murphy, Tom Schenkenberg, Jeff S. Hunter & Margaret P. Battin (1997). Advance Directives: A Computer Assisted Approach to Assuring Patients' Rights and Compliance with PSDA and JCAHO Standards. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 9 (3):247-255.score: 30.0
  42. Walter Cerf, D. H. Monro, Anthony Palmer, P. T. Geach, O. P. Wood & Geoffrey Hunter (1968). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 77 (305):136-153.score: 30.0
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  43. Geoffrey Hunter (1973). "Not Both P and Not Q, Therefore If P Then Q" is Not a Valid Form of Argument. Mind 82 (326):280.score: 30.0
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  44. Graeme Hunter & Brad Inwood (1984). Plato, Leibniz, and the Furnished Soul. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (4):423-434.score: 30.0
  45. Harold Hunter (1983). Spirit Christology: Dilemma and Promise (1). Heythrop Journal 24 (2):127–140.score: 30.0
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  46. Daniel Hunter (1992). Book Review:Causation, Chance, and Credence: Proceedings of the Irvine Conference on Probability and Causation, Volume 1 Brian Skyrms, William L. Harper; Causation in Decision, Belief Change, and Statistics: Proceedings of the Irvine Conference on Probability and Causation, Volume 2 William L. Harper, Brian Skyrms. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 59 (3):512-.score: 30.0
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  47. Geoffrey Hunter (1965). A Possible Extension of Logical Theory? Philosophical Studies 16 (6):81 - 88.score: 30.0
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  48. Geoffrey Hunter (1993). The Meaning of `If' in Conditional Propositions. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (172):279-297.score: 30.0
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  49. J. F. M. Hunter (1977). Wittgenstein and Materialism. Mind 86 (344):514-531.score: 30.0
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  50. Paul Pietrowski, Justin Halberda, Jeff Lidz & and Tim Hunter, Beyond Truth Conditions: An Investigation Into the Semantics of 'Most'.score: 30.0
    Contact Info: Paul Pietroski Department of Linguistics University of Maryland Marie Mount Hall College Park, MD 20742 USA Email: pietro@umd.edu Phone: +1 301-395-1747..
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