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  1. Gwen Adshead (2010). Looking Backward and Forward. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (3):251-253.
    Philosophy says that life must be understood backwards. But . . . it must be lived forward. . , , It is more and more evident that life can never be really understood in Time. It was a pleasure to read Jason Thompson’s serious and thought-provoking piece, and I am grateful to the editors for giving me a chance to comment. The idea that the self is revealed in narrative is a popular one among different schools of psychotherapy, both in (...)
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  2. Gwen Adshead (2003). Measuring Moral Identities: Psychopaths and Responsibility. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (2):185-187.
  3. Gwen Adshead (2002). Through a Glass Darkly: Commentary on Ward. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (1):15-18.
  4. Gwen Adshead (1999). Psychopaths and Other-Regarding Beliefs. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (1):41-44.
  5. Paul S. Appelbaum (1998). Ought We to Require Emotional Capacity as Part of Decisional Competence? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (4):377-387.
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  6. Kent Bach (1993). Emotional Disorder and Attention. In George Graham (ed.), Philosophical Psychopathology. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Some would say that philosophy can contribute more to the occurrence of mental disorder than to the study of it. Thinking too much does have its risks, but so do willful ignorance and selective inattention. Well, what can philosophy contribute? It is not equipped to enumerate the symptoms and varieties of disorder or to identify their diverse causes, much less offer cures (maybe it can do that-personal philosophical therapy is now available in the Netherlands). On the other hand, the scientific (...)
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  7. Mario Beauregard (ed.) (2004). Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins.
  8. Mark H. Bickhard (2002). Mind as Process. In F.G. Riffert & Marcel Weber (eds.), Searching for New Contrasts. Vienna: Peter Lang. 285-294.
    assumptions about the phenomena of interest with process models. Thus, phlogiston has been replaced by combustion, caloric by random thermal motion, and vital fluid by far- from-equilibrium self-reproducing organizations of process. The most significant exceptions to this historical pattern are found in studies of the mind. Here, substance assumptions are still ubiquitous, ranging from models of representation to those of emotions to personality and psychopathology. Substance assumptions do pernicious damage to our ability to understand such phenomena. In this discussion, I (...)
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  9. R. J. R. Blair (2008). The Cognitive Neuroscience of Psychopathy and Implications for Judgments of Responsibility. Neuroethics 1 (3):149-157.
    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder associated with specific forms of emotional dysfunction and an increased risk for both frustration-based reactive aggression and goal-directed instrumental antisocial behavior. While the full behavioral manifestation of the disorder is under considerable social influence, the basis of this disorder appears to be genetic. At the neural level, individuals with psychopathy show atypical responding within the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Moreover, the roles of the amygdala in stimulus-reinforcement learning and responding to emotional expressions and (...)
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  10. Derek Bolton (2008). What is Mental Disorder?: An Essay in Philosophy, Science, and Values. Oxford University Press.
    The effects of mental disorder are apparent and pervasive, in suffering, loss of freedom and life opportunities, negative impacts on education, work satisfaction and productivity, complications in law, institutions of healthcare, and more. With a new edition of the 'bible' of psychiatric diagnosis - the DSM - under developmental, it is timely to take a step back and re-evalutate exactly how we diagnose and define mental disorder. This new book by Derek Bolton tackles the problems involved in the definition and (...)
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  11. Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew Broome (2012). Affective Dimensions of the Phenomenon of Double Bookkeeping in Delusions. Emotion Review 4 (2):187-191.
    It has been argued that schizophrenic delusions are “behaviourally inert.” This is evidence for the phenomenon of “double bookkeeping,” according to which people are not consistent in their commitment to the content of their delusions. The traditional explanation for the phenomenon is that people do not genuinely believe the content of their delusions. In the article, we resist the traditional explanation and offer an alternative hypothesis: people with delusions often fail to acquire or to maintain the motivation to act on (...)
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  12. Louis C. Charland, Validity, Value, and Emotion.
    How does one scientifically verify a psychometric instrument designed to assess the mental competence of medical patients who are asked to consent to medical treatment? Aside from satisfying technical requirements like statistical reliability, results yielded by such a test must conform to at least some accepted pretheoretical desiderata; for example, determinations of competence, as measured by the test, must capture a minimal core of accepted basic intuitions about what competence means and what a theory of competence is supposed to do. (...)
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  13. Louis C. Charland (2009). Technological Reason and the Regulation of Emotion. In James Phillips (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Technology and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
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  14. Louis C. Charland (2007). Anorexia and the MacCAT-T Test for Mental Competence: Validity, Value, and Emotion. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (4):283-287.
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  15. Louis C. Charland (1998). Appreciation and Emotion: Theoretical Reflections on the Macarthur Treatment Competence Study. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (4):359-376.
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  16. Luc Ciompi (2003). Reflections on the Role of Emotions in Consciousness and Subjectivity, From the Perspective of Affect-Logic. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):181-196.
    The phenomena of human consciousness and subjectivity are explored from the perspective of affect-logic, a comprehensive meta-theory of the interactions between emotion and cognition based mainly on cognitive and social psychology, psychopathology, neurobiology Piaget?s genetic epistemology, psychoanalysis, and evolutionary science. According to this theory, overt or covert affective-cognitive interactions are obligatorily present in all mental activity, seemingly ?neutral? thinking included. Emotions continually exert numerous so-called operator-effects, both linear and nonlinear, on attention, on memory and on comprehensive thought, or logic in (...)
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  17. Lisa Damm (2011). Emotions and Moral Agency. Philosophical Explorations 13 (3):275-292.
    In this paper, I present a general profile of individuals with psychopathy, autism, and acquired sociopathy as well as look specifically at the abilities of these individuals with respect to the moral domain. These individuals are individually and collectively interesting because of their significant affective and social impairments. I argue that none of these individuals should be considered full moral agents based on a proposed account of moral agency consisting of the following two necessary conditions: (1) the capacity for moral (...)
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  18. Jean-Marie Danion, Caroline Huron, Lydia Rizzo & Pierre Vidailhet (2004). Emotion, Memory, and Conscious Awareness in Schizophrenia. In Daniel Reisberg & Paula Hertel (eds.), Memory and Emotion. Oxford University Press. 217-241.
  19. P. Enriquez & E. BErnabeu (2008). Hemispheric Laterality and Dissociative Tendencies: Differences in Emotional Processing in a Dichotic Listening Task. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):267-275.
  20. Esther Fujiwara & Marcel Kinsbourne (2006). Forging a Link Between Cognitive and Emotional Repression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):519-520.
    Erdelyi distinguishes between cognitive and emotional forms of repression, but argues that they use the same general mechanism. His discussion of experimental memory findings, on the one hand, and clinical examples, on the other, does indeed indicate considerable overlap. As an in-between level of evidence, research findings on emotion in neuroscience, as well as experimental and social/personality psychology, further support his argument.
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  21. Shaun Gallagher (2004). The Interpersonal and Emotional Beginnings of Understanding: A Review of Peter Hobson's The Cradle of Thought: Exploring the Origins of Thinking. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (3):253-257.
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  22. Daniel Goleman (ed.) (2003). Healing Emotions: Conversations with the Dalai Lama on Mindfulness, Emotions, and Health. Shambhala.
    Can the mind heal the body? The Buddhist tradition says yes--and now many Western scientists are beginning to agree. Healing Emotions is the record of an extraordinary series of encounters between the Dalai Lama and prominent Western psychologists, physicians, and meditation teachers that sheds new light on the mind-body connection. Topics include: compassion as medicine; the nature of consciousness; self-esteem; and the meeting points of mind, body, and spirit. This edition contains a new foreword by the editor.
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  23. O. H. Green (2002). Jon Elster, Alchemies of the Mind: Rationality and the Emotions and Strong Feelings: Emotion, Addiction, and Behavior:Alchemies of the Mind: Rationality and the Emotions;Strong Feelings: Emotion, Addiction, and Behavior. Ethics 112 (2):371-375.
  24. Jonathan Haidt, Disgust: The Body and Soul Emotion in the 21st Century.
    The present volume is, we believe, the first-ever edited volume devoted to the emotion of disgust. In this chapter we address the following issues: 1. Why was disgust almost completely ignored until about 1990, 2. Why has there been a great increase in attention to disgust since about 1990?, 3. The outline of an integrative, body-to-soul preadaptation theory of disgust, 4. Some specific features of disgust that make it particularly susceptible to laboratory research and particularly appropriate to address some fundamental (...)
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  25. Bernard Hart (1926). Emotion and Insanity. By S. Thalbitzer. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., 1926. Pp. X + 126. Price 7s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 1 (03):391-.
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  26. James Hillman (1960/1992). Emotion: A Comprehensive Phenomenology of Theories and Their Meaning for Therapy. Northwestern University Press.
    Routledge is now re-issuing this prestigious series of 204 volumes originally published between 1910 and 1965.
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  27. R. D. Hinshelwood (2005). Form, Space, Body, and Emotions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (1):43-48.
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  28. Dr Jakob Hohwy, Cognitive Neuropsychiatry 8: 237–242, 2003.
    The field of philosophical psychopathology is basically the philosophical study of mental disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, autism, as well as more specific symptoms and signs such as Capgras’ delusion (the delusion that your spouse, for example, is an impostor) or the anarchic hand sign (where your hand seems to act on its own intentions). This simple epithet covers a multitude of approaches: how can philosophy help to explain mental disorder? What does mental disorder tell us about consciousness, (...)
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  29. Carroll E. Izard, Christopher J. Trentacosta & Kristen A. King (2005). Brain, Emotions, and Emotion-Cognition Relations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):208-209.
    Lewis makes a strong case for the interdependence and integration of emotion and cognitive processes. Yet, these processes exhibit considerable independence in early life, as well as in certain psychopathological conditions, suggesting that the capacity for their integration emerges as a function of development. In some circumstances, the concept of highly interactive emotion and cognitive systems seems a viable alternative hypothesis to the idea of systems integration.
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  30. Joan D. Koss-Chioino (2005). Spirit Healing, Mental Health, and Emotion Regulation. Zygon 40 (2):409-422.
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  31. Michael Lacewing (2004). Emotion and Cognition: Recent Developments and Therapeutic Practice. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):175-186.
    As is widely known, the last 25 years have seen an acceleration in the development of theories of emotion. Perhaps less well-known is that the last three years have seen an extended defense of a predominant, though not universally accepted, framework for the understanding of emotion in philosophy and psychology. The central claim of this framework is that emotions are a form of evaluative response to their intentional objects, centrally involving cognition or something akin to cognition, in which the evaluation (...)
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  32. Michelle Maiese (2011). Embodiment, Emotion, and Cognition. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Series Editors' Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- The Essential Embodiment Thesis -- Essentially Embodied, Desire-Based Emotions -- Sense of Self,_Embodiment, and Desire-Based Emotions -- The Role of Emotion in Decision and Moral Evaluation -- Essentially Embodied, Emotive, Enactive Social Cognition -- Breakdowns in Embodied Emotive Cognition -- Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Index.
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  33. Michael McEachrane (2009). Capturing Emotional Thoughts: The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  34. Nick Medford & Anthony S. David (2006). Learning From Repression: Emotional Memory and Emotional Numbing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):527-528.
    Erdelyi argues persuasively for his unified theory of repression. Beyond this, what can studying repression bring to our understanding of other aspects of emotional function? Here we consider ways in which work on repression might inform the study of, on one hand, emotional memory, and on the other, the emotional numbing seen in patients with chronic persistent depersonalization symptoms.
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  35. Mitchell A. Meltzer & Kristy A. Nielson (2010). Memory for Emotionally Provocative Words in Alexithymia: A Role for Stimulus Relevance. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1062-1068.
  36. Maria Miceli & Cristiano Castelfranchi (1996). Commentary on "Towards a Design-Based Analysis of Emotional Episodes&Quot. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (2):129-133.
  37. Christian Miller (2009). Review of Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (Ed.), Moral Psychology, Volume 3: The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders, and Development. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (7).
    This is the third of three volumes on moral psychology edited by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and published by MIT Press in 2008.
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  38. Daniel Moseley & Gary Gala (forthcoming). On the Nature of Psychopathy. In Fabrice Jotterand & James Giordano (eds.), The Neurobiology of Social Disruption: International Perspectives of Psychiatry, Pathology and Society. Potomic Institute Press.
    The primary goal of this essay is to clarify the concept of psychopathy and distinguish it from other, related, concepts. We contend that the paradigmatic trait of psychopathy is a propensity to violence that is accompanied by a lack of conscience. We also argue that conceptual clarity on this point is important for devising empirical criteria for identifying psychopaths. We also argue that a full theory of psychopathy will require one to utilize theories and assumptions that pertain to central issues (...)
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  39. A. NeumAnn, S. Blairy, D. Lecompte & P. PhiliPpot (2007). Specificity Deficit in the Recollection of Emotional Memories in Schizophrenia☆☆☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):469-484.
  40. Georg Northoff (2005). Emotional-Cognitive Integration, the Self, and Cortical Midline Structures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):211-212.
    Lewis discusses the dynamic mechanisms of emotional-cognitive integration. I argue that he neglects the self and its neural correlate. The self can be characterized as an emotional-cognitive unity, which may be accounted for by the interplay between anterior and posterior medial cortical regions. I propose that these regions form an anatomical, physiological, and psychological unity, the cortical midline structures (CMSs).
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  41. Keith Oatley & Philip N. Johnson-Laird (2011). Basic Emotions in Social Relationships, Reasoning, and Psychological Illnesses. Emotion Review 3 (4):424-433.
    The communicative theory of emotions postulates that emotions are communications both within the brain and between individuals. Basic emotions owe their evolutionary origins to social mammals, and they enable human beings to use repertoires of mental resources appropriate to recurring and distinctive kinds of events. These emotions also enable them to cooperate with other individuals, to compete with them, and to disengage from them. The human system of emotions has also grafted onto basic emotions propositional contents about the cause of (...)
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  42. Hester Parr & Joyce Davidson (2008). Virtual Trust": Online Emotional Intimacies in Mental Health Support. In Julie Brownlie, Alexandra Greene & Alexandra Howson (eds.), Researching Trust and Health. Routledge. 33.
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  43. Jennifer Radden (ed.) (2004). The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford University Press.
    This is a comprehensive resource of original essays by leading thinkers exploring the newly emerging inter-disciplinary field of the philosophy of psychiatry. The contributors aim to define this exciting field and to highlight the philosophical assumptions and issues that underlie psychiatric theory and practice, the category of mental disorder, and rationales for its social, clinical and legal treatment. As a branch of medicine and a healing practice, psychiatry relies on presuppositions that are deeply and unavoidably philosophical. Conceptions of rationality, personhood (...)
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  44. Matthew Ratcliffe (2002). Heidegger's Attunement and the Neuropsychology of Emotion. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):287-312.
    I outline the early Heidegger's views on mood and emotion, and then relate his central claims to some recent finding in neuropsychology. These findings complement Heidegger in a number of important ways. More specifically, I suggest that, in order to make sense of certain neurological conditions that traditional assumptions concerning the mind are constitutionally incapable of accommodating, something very like Heidegger's account of mood and emotion needs to be adopted as an interpretive framework. I conclude by supporting Heidegger's insistence that (...)
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  45. Stuart G. Shanker (2004). Autism and the Dynamic Developmental Model of Emotions. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (3):219-233.
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  46. Warren A. Shibles (1974). Emotion: The Method Of Philosophical Therapy. Language Press.
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  47. Marco Solinas (2009). Sulle tracce della malinconia. Un approccio filosofico-sociale. Costruzioni Psicoanalitiche (17):83-102.
    The essay aims to analyse the gradual historical process of the partial overlap, replacement and expansion of the theoretical paradigm of depression with respect to that of melancholy. The first part is devoted to analysing some of the central features of the multivalent thematizations of melancholy drawn up during modernity, also with relation to the spirit of capitalism (in its Weberian acceptation). This is followed by an overview of the birth of the modern category of depression, and the process that (...)
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  48. Marco Solinas (2008). Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros. Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
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  49. Marco Solinas (2005). Desideri: fenomenologia degenerativa e strategie di controllo. In Mario Vegetti (ed.), Platone. La Repubblica. Bibliopolis. vol. VI, 471-498.
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  50. Somogy Varga (2011). Winnicott, Symbolic Play, and Other Minds. Philosophical Psychology 24 (5):625 - 637.
    In this paper, I will attempt to follow Winnicott's thoughts on the intrinsic connection between symbolic play and the way we understand other minds. Phenomenological, conceptual and empirical difficulties in the account will be presented and taken into consideration. Winnicott's account proves to be a fruitful guide into the issue and can help us clarify impaired symbolic play in autism.
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