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  1. The Ethics of Sexual Reorientation: What Should Clinicians and Researchers Do?Sean Aas & Candice Delmas - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2016-103562.
    Technological measures meant to change sexual orientation are, we have argued elsewhere, deeply alarming, even and indeed especially if they are safe and effective. Here we point out that this in part because they produce a distinctive kind of ‘clinical collective action problem’, a sort of dilemma for individual clinicians and researchers: a treatment which evidently relieves the suffering of particular patients, but in the process contributes to a practice that substantially worsens the conditions that produce this suffering in the (...)
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  2. Views of Patients with Heart Failure About Their Role in the Decision to Start Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Treatment: Prescription Rather Than Participation.A. Agard, R. Lofmark, N. Edvardsson & I. Ekman - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):514-518.
    Background: There is a shortage of reports on what potential recipients of implantable cardioverter–defibrillators need to be informed about and what role they can and want to play in the decision-making process when it comes to whether or not to implant an ICD.Aims: To explore how patients with heart failure and previous episodes of malignant arrhythmia experience and view their role in the decision to initiate ICD treatment.Patients and methods: A qualitative content analysis of semistructured interviews was used. The study (...)
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  3. Courteous but Not Curious: How Doctors' Politeness Masks Their Existential Neglect. A Qualitative Study of Video-Recorded Patient Consultations.K. M. Agledahl, P. Gulbrandsen, R. Forde & A. Wifstad - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):650-654.
    Objective To study how doctors care for their patients, both medically and as fellow humans, through observing their conduct in patient–doctor encounters. Design Qualitative study in which 101 videotaped consultations were observed and analysed using a Grounded Theory approach, generating explanatory categories through a hermeneutical analysis of the taped consultations. Setting A 500-bed general teaching hospital in Norway. Participants 71 doctors working in clinical non-psychiatric departments and their patients. Results The doctors were concerned about their patients' health and how their (...)
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  4. Flat Belly Overnight Review By Andrew Raposo. [REVIEW]Raposo Andrew - 2016 - Global Journal of Management and Business Research 16 (12):3.
    Flat Belly Overnight Reviews By Andrew Raposo is an outstanding tricks and tips to lose belly fat overnight.Flat Belly Overnight Program Reviews for who struggling with belly fat. Flat Belly Overnight system provide some trick to lose 2 pound belly fat by sleeping.
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  5. Health as a Clinic-Epidemiological Concept.Marco Antonio Azevedo - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):365-373.
    I propose a clinic-epidemiological concept of health as the best description of what physicians actually think about health within medical practice. Its aim is to be an alternative to the best approach in the philosophy of medicine about health, Christopher Boorse’s biostatistical theory. Contrary to Boorse’s ‘theoretical’ approach, I propose to take health as a practical clinical concept. In the first two parts of the paper, I will present my complaints against Boorse’s view that health is a theoretical concept, a (...)
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  6. L'invention des maladies à but lucratif [On disease mongering].Rosangela Barcaro - 2014 - Arc En Ciel. La Revue de Nouveaux Droits de L’Homme (72):24-25.
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  7. Communication Behaviors and Patient Autonomy in Hospital Care: A Qualitative Study.Zackary Berger - 2017 - Patient Education and Counseling 2017.
    BACKGROUND: Little is known about how hospitalized patients share decisions with physicians. METHODS: We conducted an observational study of patient-doctor communication on an inpatient medicine service among 18 hospitalized patients and 9 physicians. A research assistant (RA) approached newly hospitalized patients and their physicians before morning rounds and obtained consent. The RA audio recorded morning rounds, and then separately interviewed both patient and physician. Coding was done using integrated analysis. RESULTS: Most patients were white (61%) and half were female. Most (...)
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  8. Health Related Quality of Life of Pregnant Women and Associated Factors: An Integrative Review.Cinthia Gondim Pereira Calou - 2014 - Health 6:2375-2387.
    Objective: The objectives were to characterize the scientific production on Health-Related Quality of Life of pregnant women, identify the areas that are most affected during pregnancy and puerperal period and identify the instruments used to assess quality of life related to health in pregnant women. Methods: For the integrative review, 11 articles published from 2006 to 2013 in the PUBMED, MEDLINE, CINAHL, SCOPUS and SCIELO were selected. Result: Data showed scarce publication from nursing professionals, prevalence of non-experimental studies conducted mainly (...)
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  9. Perspectives on Clinical Possibility: Elements of Analysis.Daniele Chiffi & Renzo Zanotti - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice:DOI: 10.1111/jep.12447.
  10. Consentement présumé, famille et équité dans le don d'organes.Speranta Dumitru - 2010 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 67 (3):341-354.
    Cet article propose une évaluation éthique des institutions qui organisent la transplantation avec donneurs décédés, au travers du rôle qu’elles accordent à la famille survivante. Son objectif est double. Il s’agit, premièrement, de montrer que la famille possède un pouvoir de décision considérable en matière de prélèvement posthume bien que les législations soient habituellement décrites comme fondées sur le consentement ou l’opposition des personnes concernées. Deuxièmement, il s’agit de montrer que les politiques qui octroient un tel pouvoir aux familles manquent (...)
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  11. Health, Homeostasis, and the Situation-Specificity of Normality.Antoine C. Dussault & Anne-Marie Gagné-Julien - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (1):61-81.
    Christopher Boorse’s Biostatistical Theory of Health has been the main contender among naturalistic accounts of health for the last 40 years. Yet, a recent criticism of this theory, presented by Elselijn Kingma, identifies a dilemma resulting from the BST’s conceptual linking of health and statistical typicality. Kingma argues that the BST either cannot accommodate the situation- specificity of many normal functions or cannot account for many situation-specific diseases. In this article, we expand upon with Daniel Hausman’s response to Kingma’s dilemma. (...)
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  12. The Political Morality of Nudges in Healthcare.Jonathan Gingerich - 2016 - In I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch & Christopher T. Robinson (eds.), Nudging Health: Health Law and Behavioral Economics. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 97-106.
    A common critique of nudges is that they reduce someone's of choices or elicit behavior through means other than rational persuasion. In this paper, I argue against this form of critique. I argue that, if there is anything distinctively worrisome about nudges from the standpoint of morality, it is is their tendency to hide the amount of social control that they embody, undermining democratic governance by making it more difficult for members of a political community to detect the social architect’s (...)
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  13. Textes Clés de Philosophie de la Médecine: Vol. Ii : Santé, Maladie, Pathologie.Élodie Giroux & Maël Lemoine - 2012 - Vrin.
    Depuis le célèbre essai de Georges Canguilhem sur le normal et le pathologique publié initialement en 1943 et dont l’un des objectifs était la clarification des concepts de santé et de maladie, une littérature philosophique abondante, principalement anglo-saxonne, s’est attachée à définir ces concepts et à analyser leur statut. Le principal débat de ce domaine émergent de la philosophie de la médecine porte sur la question : peut-on décrire la santé et la maladie comme des phénomènes naturels ou s’agit-il d’états (...)
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  14. Defining Quality of Care Persuasively.Maya J. Goldenberg - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):243-261.
    As the quality movement in health care now enters its fourth decade, the language of quality is ubiquitous. Practitioners, organizations, and government agencies alike vociferously testify their commitments to quality and accept numerous forms of governance aimed at improving quality of care. Remarkably, the powerful phrase ‘‘quality of care’’ is rarely defined in the health care literature. Instead it operates as an accepted and assumed goal worth pursuing. The status of evidence-based medicine, for instance, hinges on its ability to improve (...)
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  15. The Nuremberg Code Subverts Human Health and Safety by Requiring Animal Modeling.Ray Greek, Annalea Pippus & Lawrence A. Hansen - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):16.
    Background: The requirement that animals be used in research and testing in order to protect humans was formalized in the Nuremberg Code and subsequent national and international laws, codes, and declarations.DiscussionWe review the history of these requirements and contrast what was known via science about animal models then with what is known now. We further analyze the predictive value of animal models when used as test subjects for human response to drugs and disease. We explore the use of animals for (...)
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  16. Ética para Psicólogos. Psicoética.Arévalo Benito Héctor & Cuenca R. C. - 2014 - UTPL.
    Ética para la psicología. Filosofía de la Psicología. Ética Aplicada. Psicoética.
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  17. In Vivo Analgesic Activity of Methanolic Extract of Helianthus Annuus Seeds.Tanjimul Islam & Rubab Tarannum Islam - 2016 - International Current Pharmaceutical Journal, 5 (4):34-38.
    The sunflower seed is the seed of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus). The methanol extract of seeds of Helianthus annuus were screened for analgesic activity in mice model to systematically explore the medicinal values of the plant. Acetic acid induced writhing and hot plate methods were used to confirm the central and peripheral analgesic action. In case of acetic acid-induced writhing test the extract showed significant (P <0.05) analgesic potential at doses 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight (50.35 and 57.85% inhibition, (...)
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  18. Phenomenology of Illness, Philosophy, and Life.Kidd Ian James - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 62:56-62.
    An essay review of Havi Carel, 'Phenomenology of Illness' (OUP 2015).
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  19. The Daily Grind of the Forgotten Heroines: Experiences of HIV/AIDS Informal Caregivers in Botswana.Odireleng Jankey & Tirelo Modie-Moroka - 2011 - Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (2):217-224.
    With the increasing number of people living with HIV/AIDS and the escalating costs of health care, there is an increasing demand for informal caregiving in the community. Currently, much emphasis is placed on individuals who are living with HIV/AIDS (in terms of the provision of social, psychological and economic support), but very little attention has been paid to the well-being and quality of life of informal caregivers. Lack of support and care for caregivers may have a negative impact on the (...)
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  20. Correlation of Macular Thickness, Multifocal ERG with Visual Acuity in Oculocutaneous Albinism (OCA).Jitendra Jethani - 2014 - Health 6:2109-2114.
    Background and Aim: Ocular albinism eww140918dxn is known to have nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia. A study was done to evaluate the correlation of visual acuity with macular thickness (MT) and mf ERG. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 eyes (10 patients) with OCA were selected. Macular thickness was evaluated with optical coherence tomography and mf ERG was done in all the patients. Results: Mean age was 16.1 ± 7.3 years. The patients were divided into three groups based on their (...)
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  21. Clustering of Multiple Risk Behaviors Among Ethnically Diverse Adolescents Living in Hawaii.Juliana L. Kahrs - 2014 - Health 6:2333-2341.
    The current study examined the prevalence and clustering of 5 health-risk behaviors among adolescents in Hawaii, including physical inactivity, low fruit and vegetable consumption, junk food consumption, excessive television time, and inadequate sleep. High school students were recruited from 5 classrooms in Oahu Hawaii. Data were collected in the spring semester of 2011. Proportions were used to describe the prevalence of single and multiple health risk behaviors. Significant health behavior clusters were revealed using an observed-to-expected (O/E) ratio method. Participating adolescents (...)
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  22. Evaluating Health Inequalities: Residual Worries.J. Paul Kelleher - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):50-51.
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  23. A Note on Being Healthy – Reply.Elselijn Kingma - 2012 - Diametros 31:136-137.
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  24. Justice in Global Pandemic Influenza Preparedness: An Analysis Based on the Values of Contribution, Ownership and Reciprocity.Meena Krishnamurthy & Matthew Herder - 2013 - Public Health Ethics (3):pht027.
    In December 2006, Indonesia decided to stop sending influenza virus specimens to the World Health Organization’s Global Influenza Surveillance Network (GISN). Indonesia justified its actions by claiming that they were in protest of the injustice of GISN. Its actions stimulated negotiations to improve the workings of GISN by developing and implementing a more just framework for ‘sharing influenza viruses and other benefits’. These negotiations eventually led to the adoption of a new framework for virus and benefit sharing in May 2011, (...)
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  25. The Naturalization of the Concept of Disease.Maël Lemoine - 2014 - In Philippe Huneman, Gérard Lambert & Marc Silberstein (eds.), History, Philosophy and Theory of the Life Sciences. Springer. pp. 19-41.
    Science starts by using terms such as ‘temperature’ or ‘fish’ or ‘gene’ to preliminarily delimitate the extension of a phenomenon, and concludes by giving most of them a technical meaning based on an explanatory model. This transforma- tion of the meaning of the term is an essential part of its naturalization. Debating on the definition of ‘disease’, what most philosophers of medicine have examined is the pre-naturalized meaning of the term: for that reason they have focused on the task of (...)
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  26. Autonomy, Value and the First Person.Hallvard Lillehammer - 2012 - In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press.
    This paper explores the claim that someone can reasonably consider themselves to be under a duty to respect the autonomy of a person who does not have the capacities normally associated with substantial self-governance.
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  27. Health and Evolution.B. I. B. Lindahl - 2000 - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 28:309-311.
  28. Sexual Satisfaction Is Reduced in the Female Patient and Sexually Intimate Partners Following Cancer Therapy.Alan M. Martinez - 2014 - ASM 4:65-70.
    As cancer survival has continued to improve, cancer patients and their sexually intimate partner (SIP) are confronted with a number of issues including sexual function and overall sexual health. Our study objective was to assess changes in sexual function in women undergoing cancer treatment and their SIP, and attempt to identify areas of needed support and improvement. In this questionnaire-based observational study, females (n = 11) completed a Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and for SIP’s (n = 11), a Brief (...)
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  29. Guías para los comités de ética de investigación del Reino Unido sobre atención de la salud después de la investigación: un comentario crítico sobre la traducción al español del borrador versión 8.0.Ignacio Mastroleo - 2012 - Perspectivas Bioéticas 17 (33):71-81.
    [RESUMEN] Este trabajo es un comentario sobre la primera traducción al español de las guías del Reino Unido “Atención después de la investigación: un marco para los comités de ética de investigación del NHS (borrador versión 8.0)”. El comentario se divide en tres partes. En la primera parte, se busca resumir la información básica necesaria para mejorar la lectura comprensiva de la traducción de las guías. En la segunda parte, se analiza una selección de la normativa argentina que trata sobre (...)
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  30. Can an Engineer Fix an Immune System?: Rethinking Theoretical Biology.Claudio Mattiussi - 2013 - Acta Biotheoretica 61 (2):223-258.
    In an instant classic paper ; 2002: 179–182) biologist Yuri Lazebnik deplores the poor effectiveness of the approach adopted by biologists to understand and “fix” biological systems. Lazebnik suggests that to remedy this state of things biologist should take inspiration from the approach used by engineers to design, understand, and troubleshoot technological systems. In the present paper I substantiate Lazebnik’s analysis by concretely showing how to apply the engineering approach to biological problems. I use an actual example of electronic circuit (...)
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  31. The Medical Nonnecessity of In Vitro Fertilization.Carolyn McLeod - 2017 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 10 (1):78-102.
    Whether in vitro fertilization is medically necessary determines, in many jurisdictions, whether it ought to be funded through public health insurance. This is certainly the case in Canada, where the Canada Health Act requires that provinces pay for all medically necessary health care services. Debate raged recently in Ontario, my own province, over whether IVF should be deemed medically necessary and therefore covered under Ontario’s Health Insurance Plan. Advocates for public funding insisted that Ontario, along with most other provinces in (...)
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  32. “Defending the CRPD: Dignity, Flourishing, and the Universal Right to Mental Health.”.Andrew Molas - 2016 - International Journal of Human Rights 20 (8):1264-1276.
    I argue that the right to mental health should be viewed as a universal human right and that the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), as an international standard, protects it because it places a positive duty on states to actively promote the mental well-being of its citizens for the purpose of preserving their dignity and allowing them to flourish. I begin by discussing the discrimination that persons with psychiatric disabilities experience, including the systemic barriers (...)
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  33. La Métaphore Vaccine. De l'Inoculation À la Vaccinologie.Anne Marie Moulin - 1992 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 14 (2):271 - 297.
    The episodes of cowpox inoculation (1798) and rabies preventive treatment (1885) are celebrated as the landmark of modern medicine. Paradoxically, these two advances have been accomplished without any theoretical breakthrough in the understanding of immunity. Going further, they were made possible by a long past of empirical procedures among which smallpox inoculation played an outstanding role. The paper explores the paradox of 'Immunization without Immunology' and Pasteur's reconstruction of the past, through his successful use of a metaphor. 'Vaccine', originally linked (...)
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  34. The Immune System: A Key Concept for the History of Immunology.Anne Marie Moulin - 1989 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 11 (2):221 - 236.
    The definition of immunology as the science of the immune system that emerged in the 1960s provides a sound basis for both reconstructing its past and constructing its future. The choice of this point in time of course involves important consequences, on the one hand, sociological and institutional, epistemological and conceptual on the other. I will attempt to demonstrate that this perspective allows us to assess the history of immunology in an innovative way1 while elucidating in the process some of (...)
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  35. Introduction: Hasard et rationalité dans l'approche vaccinale.Anne-Marie Moulin - 1995 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 17 (1):5 - 29.
    The aim of this paper is to introduce the one hundred years of vaccination that has passed since Louis Pasteur first coined this generic term. According to the late Jonas Salk, vaccinology is a science encompassing all aspects of vaccine from its conception in the laboratory to its production by companies and its application and distribution in the field. In this historical survey I explore how vaccination never consisted of a simple and uniform application of a rational model, but rather (...)
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  36. Disgust, Contamination, and Vaccine Refusal.Mark Navin - manuscript
    Vaccine refusers often seem motivated by disgust, and they invoke ideas of purity, contamination and sanctity. Unfortunately, the emotion of disgust and its companion ideas are not directly responsive to the probabilistic and statistical evidence of research science. It follows that increased efforts to promulgate the results of vaccine science are not likely to contribute to increased rates of vaccination among persons who refuse vaccines because of the ‘ethics of sanctity’. Furthermore, the fact that disgust-based vaccine refusal is not monolithic (...)
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  37. Resisting Moral Permissiveness About Vaccine Refusal.Mark Navin - 2013 - Public Affairs Quarterly 27 (1):69-85.
    I argue that a parental prerogative to sometimes prioritize the interests of one’s children over the interests of others is insufficient to make the parental refusal of routine childhood vaccines morally permissible. This is because the moral permissibility of vaccine refusal follows from such a parental prerogative only if the only (weighty) moral reason in favor of vaccination is that vaccination is a means for promoting the interests of others. However, there are two additional weighty moral reasons in favor of (...)
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  38. Significant Association of Nightly Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Using Time with Weight Change in Japanese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome.Tsuguo Nishijima - 2014 - Health 6:2295-2302.
    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is one of the representative sleep disorders believed to be associated with metabolic syndrome. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) ventilation is the first choice therapy for OSAS, which has been reported to cause an improvement in body fat mass, hepatocellular damage and hypertension. Study Objectives: We evaluated whether the changes in the body weight observed in patients with OSAS may have potential associations with the sleep time during which the patients are under nCPAP. (...)
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  39. Financial Incentives to Encourage Healthy Behaviour: An Analysis of UK Media.Hannah Parke, Richard Ashcroft, Rebecca Brown & Clive Seale - 2013 - Health Expectations 16 (3):292-304.
    Background Policies to use financial incentives to encourage healthy behaviour are controversial. Much of this controversy is played out in the mass media, both reflecting and shaping public opinion. Objective To describe UK mass media coverage of incentive schemes, comparing schemes targeted at different client groups and assessing the relative prominence of the views of different interest groups. Design Thematic content analysis. Subjects National and local news coverage in newspapers, news media targeted at health-care providers and popular websites between January (...)
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  40. Accuracy of Measuring Axillary Temperature Using Mercury in Glass Thermometers in Children Under Five Years: A Cross Sectional Observational Study.Priyantha Perera - 2014 - Health 6:2115-2120.
    Measuring axillary temperature with mercury in glass thermometers is continued in clinical practice though there are many limitations. This is mainly due to convenience and cost. This study was conducted to ascertain the accuracy of measuring axillary temperature with mercury thermometers in preschool children. Methods: Axillary temperature was measured in 250 preschool children using standardized mercury thermometers. Time taken to record the final temperature and its correlates were assessed. Results: Time taken to record the final temperature extended up to six (...)
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  41. Health and Well-Being.Jason R. Raibley - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (2):469-489.
    Eudaimonistic theorists of welfare have recently attacked conative accounts of welfare. Such accounts, it is claimed, are unable to classify states normally associated with physical and emotional health as non-instrumentally good and states associated with physical and psychological damage as non-instrumentally bad. However, leading eudaimonistic theories such as the self-fulfillment theory and developmentalism have problems of their own. Furthermore, conative theorists can respond to this challenge by dispositionalizing their theories, i.e., by saying that it is not merely the realization of (...)
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  42. With All Due Caution: Global Anti-Obesity Campaigns and the Individualization of Responsibility.Alison Reiheld - 2015 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):226-249.
    Obesity is one of several targets of public health efforts related to availability of and access to healthy foods. The tension between individual food decisions and social contexts of food production, preparation, and consumption makes targeting individuals deeply problematic and yet tempting. Such individualization of responsibility for obesity and nutrition is unethical and impractical. This article warns public health campaigns against giving into the temptation to individualize responsibility, and presents an argument for why they should proceed with all due caution, (...)
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  43. Fragility, Uncertainty, and Healthcare.Wendy A. Rogers & Mary J. Walker - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (1):71-83.
    Medicine seeks to overcome one of the most fundamental fragilities of being human, the fragility of good health. No matter how robust our current state of health, we are inevitably susceptible to future illness and disease, while current disease serves to remind us of various frailties inherent in the human condition. This article examines the relationship between fragility and uncertainty with regard to health, and argues that there are reasons to accept rather than deny at least some forms of uncertainty. (...)
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  44. Value Choices in Summary Measures of Population Health.S. Andrew Schroeder - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (2):176-187.
    Summary measures of health, such as the quality-adjusted life year and disability-adjusted life year, have long been known to incorporate a number of value choices. In this paper, though, I show that the value choices in the construction of such measures extend far beyond what is generally recognized. In showing this, I hope both to improve the understanding of those measures by epidemiologists, health economists and policy-makers, and also to contribute to the general debate about the extent to which such (...)
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  45. Health, Disability, and Well-Being.S. Andrew Schroeder - 2016 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge.
    Much academic work (in philosophy, economics, law, etc.), as well as common sense, assumes that ill health reduces well-being. It is bad for a person to become sick, injured, disabled, etc. Empirical research, however, shows that people living with health problems report surprisingly high levels of well-being - in some cases as high as the self-reported well-being of healthy people. In this chapter, I explore the relationship between health and well-being. I argue that although we have good reason to believe (...)
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  46. Rethinking Health: Healthy or Healthier Than?S. Andrew Schroeder - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (1):131-159.
    Theorists of health have, to this point, focused exclusively on trying to define a state—health—that an organism might be in. I argue that they have overlooked the possibility of a comparativist theory of health, which would begin by defining a relation—healthier than—that holds between two organisms or two possible states of the same organism. I show that a comparativist approach to health has a number of attractive features, and has important implications for philosophers of medicine, bioethicists, health economists, and policy (...)
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  47. Evidence-Based Persuasion: An Ethical Imperative.David Shaw & Bernice Elger - 2013 - Journal of the American Medical Association 309 (16):1689-90.
    The primacy in modern medical ethics of the principle of respect for autonomy has led to the widespread assumption that it is unethical to change someone’s beliefs, because doing so would constitute coercion or paternalism., In this Viewpoint we suggest that persuasion is not necessarily paternalistic and is an essential component of modern medical practice.
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  48. Minimizing Harm Via Psychological Intervention: Response to Glannon.Joshua Shepherd - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):662-663.
    In a recent discussion, Walter Glannon discusses a number of ways we might try to minimize harm to patients who experience intraoperative awareness. In this response I direct attention to a possibility that deserves further attention. It might be that a kind of psychological intervention – namely, informing patients of the possibility of intraoperative awareness and of what to expect in such a case – would constitute a unique way to respect patient autonomy, as well as minimize the harm that (...)
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  49. Review of Listening Into the Heart of Things-on MDMA and LSD by Samuel Widmer (1989).Michael Starks - 2016 - In Philosophy, Human Nature and the Collapse of Civilization -- Articles and Reviews 2006-2017 3rd Ed 686p(2017). Henderson,NV, USA: Michael Starks. pp. 573-575.
    This is an early volume from a much respected psychedelic psychotherapist. He has written several other books since this one but until recently none of his books were on Amazon and still you can only find a German edition and a Spanish one (from 1993) but no English one (except a couple used copies). This is sad since these drugs have enormous therapeutic potential but afaik government suppression still prevents their use. The most interesting and readable parts are the case (...)
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  50. Health As Embodied Authenticity.Margaret Steele - 2015 - Dissertation, Marquette University
    This dissertation offers a phenomenological and existential account of health. It considers the model of health that is dominant in the contemporary USA. Using the example of fatness, this dissertation argues that the dominant model of health is deeply flawed, because of its largely unexamined commitment to naturalism and positivism. It concludes that purported alternatives to the dominant model, such as the Foucault-influenced constructivist approach to health, fail to respond adequately to the problems posed by naturalism and positivism. Instead, this (...)
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