Results for 'Robert W. Wesley'

Order:
  1.  38
    A Survey of Researchers Using a Consent Policy for Cognitively Impaired Human Research Subjects.Philip J. Candilis, Robert W. Wesley & Alison Wichman - 1993 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 15 (6):1.
  2.  14
    The Colorado River Region and John Wesley Powell. Mary C. Rabbitt, Edwin D. McKeeJohn Wesley Powell and the Anthropology of the Canyon Country. Don D. Fowler, Robert C. Euler, Catherine S. Fowler. [REVIEW]George W. White - 1970 - Isis 61 (2):285-287.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  20
    Tp [\ Canadian (Q\ JJJournal of£| Philosophy.Nicholas Asher, Graciela De Pierris, Paul Gomberg, Robert E. Goodin, Charles W. Mills, Jordan Howard Sobel, Andrew Levine, Frank Cunningham, W. J. Waluchow & Wesley Cooper - 1989 - Philosophy 19 (3).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  18
    Robert W. Duffner. The Adaptive Optics Revolution: A History. Foreword by Robert Q. Fugate. Xxviii + 457 Pp., Illus., Index. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2009. $45. [REVIEW]Robert W. Smith - 2010 - Isis 101 (3):673-674.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  25
    Robert W. Farquhar. Fifty Years on the Space Frontier: Halo Orbits, Comets, Asteroids, and More. V + 447 Pp., Tables, Illus., Bibl. Denver: Outskirts Press, 2011. $86.95. [REVIEW]Robert W. Smith - 2012 - Isis 103 (4):803-804.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. J. S. Mill's Language of Pleasures*: Robert W. Hoag.Robert W. Hoag - 1992 - Utilitas 4 (2):247-278.
    A significant feature of John Stuart Mill's moral theory is the introduction of qualitative differences as relevant to the comparative value of pleasures. Despite its significance, Mill presents his doctrine of qualities of pleasures in only a few paragraphs in the second chapter of Utilitarianism, where he begins the brief discussion by saying: utilitarian writers in general have placed the superiority of mental over bodily pleasures chiefly … in their circumstantial advantages rather than in their intrinsic nature.… [B]ut they might (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7. The Devil in the Details: Asymptotic Reasoning in Explanation, Reduction, and Emergence.Robert W. Batterman - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Robert Batterman examines a form of scientific reasoning called asymptotic reasoning, arguing that it has important consequences for our understanding of the scientific process as a whole. He maintains that asymptotic reasoning is essential for explaining what physicists call universal behavior. With clarity and rigor, he simplifies complex questions about universal behavior, demonstrating a profound understanding of the underlying structures that ground them. This book introduces a valuable new method that is certain to fill explanatory gaps across disciplines.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   206 citations  
  8. Minimal Model Explanations.Robert W. Batterman & Collin C. Rice - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (3):349-376.
    This article discusses minimal model explanations, which we argue are distinct from various causal, mechanical, difference-making, and so on, strategies prominent in the philosophical literature. We contend that what accounts for the explanatory power of these models is not that they have certain features in common with real systems. Rather, the models are explanatory because of a story about why a class of systems will all display the same large-scale behavior because the details that distinguish them are irrelevant. This story (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   96 citations  
  9. On the Explanatory Role of Mathematics in Empirical Science.Robert W. Batterman - 2010 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):1-25.
    This paper examines contemporary attempts to explicate the explanatory role of mathematics in the physical sciences. Most such approaches involve developing so-called mapping accounts of the relationships between the physical world and mathematical structures. The paper argues that the use of idealizations in physical theorizing poses serious difficulties for such mapping accounts. A new approach to the applicability of mathematics is proposed.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   96 citations  
  10. Motivation Reconsidered: The Concept of Competence.Robert W. White - 1959 - Psychological Review 66 (5):297-333.
  11. Idealization and Modeling.Robert W. Batterman - 2009 - Synthese 169 (3):427-446.
    This paper examines the role of mathematical idealization in describing and explaining various features of the world. It examines two cases: first, briefly, the modeling of shock formation using the idealization of the continuum. Second, and in more detail, the breaking of droplets from the points of view of both analytic fluid mechanics and molecular dynamical simulations at the nano-level. It argues that the continuum idealizations are explanatorily ineliminable and that a full understanding of certain physical phenomena cannot be obtained (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   71 citations  
  12. Emergence, Singularities, and Symmetry Breaking.Robert W. Batterman - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (6):1031-1050.
    This paper looks at emergence in physical theories and argues that an appropriate way to understand socalled “emergent protectorates” is via the explanatory apparatus of the renormalization group. It is argued that mathematical singularities play a crucial role in our understanding of at least some well-defined emergent features of the world.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  13. Hermeneutical Paths to the Sacred Worlds of India Essays in Honour of Robert W. Stevenson.Robert W. Stevenson & Katherine K. Young - 1994
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  58
    Autonomy of Theories: An Explanatory Problem.Robert W. Batterman - 2018 - Noûs:858-873.
    This paper aims to draw attention to an explanatory problem posed by the existence of multiply realized or universal behavior exhibited by certain physical systems. The problem is to explain how it is possible that systems radically distinct at lower-scales can nevertheless exhibit identical or nearly identical behavior at upper-scales. Theoretically this is reflected by the fact that continuum theories such as fluid mechanics are spectacularly successful at predicting, describing, and explaining fluid behaviors despite the fact that they do not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  15. Multiple Realizability and Universality.Robert W. Batterman - 2000 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):115-145.
    This paper concerns what Jerry Fodor calls a 'metaphysical mystery': How can there by macroregularities that are realized by wildly heterogeneous lower level mechanisms? But the answer to this question is not as mysterious as many, including Jaegwon Kim, Ned Block, and Jerry Fodor might think. The multiple realizability of the properties of the special sciences such as psychology is best understood as a kind of universality, where 'universality' is used in the technical sense one finds in the physics literature. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   87 citations  
  16. Asymptotics and the Role of Minimal Models.Robert W. Batterman - 2002 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (1):21-38.
    A traditional view of mathematical modeling holds, roughly, that the more details of the phenomenon being modeled that are represented in the model, the better the model is. This paper argues that often times this ‘details is better’ approach is misguided. One ought, in certain circumstances, to search for an exactly solvable minimal model—one which is, essentially, a caricature of the physics of the phenomenon in question.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  17.  78
    Toward an Integrated Theory of Insight in Problem Solving.Robert W. Weisberg - 2015 - Thinking and Reasoning 21 (1):5-39.
    The study of insight in problem solving and creative thinking has seen an upsurge of interest in the last 30 years. Current theorising concerning insight has taken one of two tacks. The special-process view, which grew out of the Gestalt psychologists’ theorising about insight, proposes that insight is the result of a dedicated set of processes that is activated by the individual's reaching impasse while trying to deal with a problematic situation. In contrast, the business-as-usual view argues that insight is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  18.  90
    The Cognitive Integration of E-Memory.Robert W. Clowes - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):107-133.
    If we are flexible, hybrid and unfinished creatures that tend to incorporate or at least employ technological artefacts in our cognitive lives, then the sort of technological regime we live under should shape the kinds of minds we possess and the sorts of beings we are. E-Memory consists in digital systems and services we use to record, store and access digital memory traces to augment, re-use or replace organismic systems of memory. I consider the various advantages of extended and embedded (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  19.  20
    Evidence for the Epistemic View of Quantum States: A Toy Theory.Robert W. Spekkens - 2007 - Physical Review A 75:032110.
    We present a toy theory that is based on a simple principle: the number of questions about the physical state of a system that are answered must always be equal to the number that are unanswered in a state of maximal knowledge. Many quantum phenomena are found to have analogues within this toy theory. These include the noncommutativity of measurements, interference, the multiplicity of convex decompositions of a mixed state, the impossibility of discriminating nonorthogonal states, the impossibility of a universal (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  20. Theories and Systems of Psychology.Robert W. Lundin - 1972 - Lexington, Mass., Heath.
  21.  54
    The Tyranny of Scales.Robert W. Batterman - 2013 - In The Oxford handbook of philosophy of physics. Oxford University Press. pp. 255-286.
    This paper examines a fundamental problem in applied mathematics. How can one model the behavior of materials that display radically different, dominant behaviors at different length scales. Although we have good models for material behaviors at small and large scales, it is often hard to relate these scale-based models to one another. Macroscale models represent the integrated effects of very subtle factors that are practically invisible at the smallest, atomic, scales. For this reason it has been notoriously difficult to model (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  22. The Relationship Between Culture and Perception of Ethical Problems in International Marketing.Robert W. Armstrong - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (11):1199 - 1208.
    This research study sought to identify whether there is a relationship between ethical perceptions and culture. An examination of the cultural variables suggests that there is a relationship between two of Hofstede's cultural dimensions (i.e., Uncertainty Avoidance and Individualism) and ethical perceptions. This finding supports the hypothetical linkage between the cultural environment and the perceived ethical problem variables posited in Hunt and Vitell's General Theory of Marketing Ethics (1986).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  23. Falling Cats, Parallel Parking, and Polarized Light.Robert W. Batterman - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 34 (4):527-557.
    This paper addresses issues surrounding the concept of geometric phase or "anholonomy". Certain physical phenomena apparently require for their explanation and understanding, reference to toplogocial/geometric features of some abstract space of parameters. These issues are related to the question of how gauge structures are to be interpreted and whether or not the debate over their "reality" is really going to be fruitful.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  24.  13
    Intending and Acting: Towards a Naturalized Action Theory.Robert W. Binkley - 1986 - Philosophy of Science 53 (3):459-461.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  25.  37
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Physics.Robert W. Batterman (ed.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This Handbook provides an overview of many of the topics that currently engage philosophers of physics. It surveys new issues and the problems that have become a focus of attention in recent years. It also provides up-to-date discussions of the still very important problems that dominated the field in the past.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26.  42
    Universality and RG Explanations.Robert W. Batterman - 2019 - Perspectives on Science 27 (1):26-47.
    In its broadest sense, "universality" is a technical term for something quite ordinary. It refers to the existence of patterns of behavior by physical systems that recur and repeat despite the fact that in some sense the situations in which these patterns recur and repeat are different. Rainbows, for example, always exhibit the same pattern of spacings and intensities of their bows despite the fact that the rain showers are different on each occasion. They are different because the shapes of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. Response to Belot’s “Whose Devil? Which Details?‘.Robert W. Batterman - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (1):154-163.
    I respond to Belot's argument and defend the view that sometimes `fundamental theories' are explanatorily inadequate and need to be supplemented with certain aspects of less fundamental `theories emeritus'.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  28.  40
    Mindreading Animals: The Debate Over What Animals Know About Other Minds.Robert W. Lurz - 2011 - Bradford.
    But do animals know that other creatures have minds? And how would we know if they do? In "Mindreading Animals," Robert Lurz offers a fresh approach to the hotly debated question of mental-state attribution in nonhuman animals.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  29. Why Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics Works: Universality and the Renormalization Group.Robert W. Batterman - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (2):183-208.
    Discussions of the foundations of Classical Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics (SM) typically focus on the problem of justifying the use of a certain probability measure (the microcanonical measure) to compute average values of certain functions. One would like to be able to explain why the equilibrium behavior of a wide variety of distinct systems (different sorts of molecules interacting with different potentials) can be described by the same averaging procedure. A standard approach is to appeal to ergodic theory to justify this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  30. Theories Between Theories: Asymptotic Limiting Intertheoretic Relations.Robert W. Batterman - 1995 - Synthese 103 (2):171 - 201.
    This paper addresses a relatively common scientific (as opposed to philosophical) conception of intertheoretic reduction between physical theories. This is the sense of reduction in which one (typically newer and more refined) theory is said to reduce to another (typically older and coarser) theory in the limit as some small parameter tends to zero. Three examples of such reductions are discussed: First, the reduction of Special Relativity (SR) to Newtonian Mechanics (NM) as (v/c)20; second, the reduction of wave optics to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  31. Defining Chaos.Robert W. Batterman - 1993 - Philosophy of Science 60 (1):43-66.
    This paper considers definitions of classical dynamical chaos that focus primarily on notions of predictability and computability, sometimes called algorithmic complexity definitions of chaos. I argue that accounts of this type are seriously flawed. They focus on a likely consequence of chaos, namely, randomness in behavior which gets characterized in terms of the unpredictability or uncomputability of final given initial states. In doing so, however, they can overlook the definitive feature of dynamical chaos--the fact that the underlying motion generating the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  32.  29
    Screen Reading and the Creation of New Cognitive Ecologies.Robert W. Clowes - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (4):705-720.
    It has been widely argued that digital technologies are transforming the nature of reading, and with it, our brains and a wide range of our cognitive capabilities. In this article, we begin by discussing the new analytical category of deep-reading and whether it is really on the decline. We analyse deep reading and its grounding in brain reorganization, based upon Michael Anderson’s Massive Redeployment hypothesis and Dehaene’s Neuronal Recycling which both help us to theorize how the capacities of brains are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  66
    Industry Type, Culture, Mode of Entry and Perceptions of International Marketing Ethics Problems: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW]Robert W. Armstrong & Jill Sweeney - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (10):775 - 785.
    The authors investigate the differences in ethical perceptions of Australian and Hong Kong international managers. Ethical perceptions are measured with respect to different industry types, cultures and modes of entry into international markets. Mode of entry refers to how firms select to enter foreign markets. Modes of entry include: exporting (indirect or direct), contractual methods (licensing and franchising) and via direct foreign investment (joint ventures and wholly-owned subsidiaries). It was determined that culture and mode of entry have a significant effect (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  34.  39
    An Examination of the Alleged Role of "Fixation" in the Solution of Several "Insight" Problems.Robert W. Weisberg & Joseph W. Alba - 1981 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 110 (2):169-192.
  35.  38
    Charles Sanders Peirce.Robert W. Burch - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  36.  69
    Adorno on Popular Culture.Robert W. Witkin - 2003 - Routledge.
    In the decades since his death, Adorno's thinking has lost none of its capacity to unsettle the settled, and has proved hugely influential in social and cultural thought. To most people, the entertainment provided by television, radio, film, newspapers, astrology charts and CD players seem harmless enough. For Adorno, however, the culture industry that produces them is ultimately toxic in its effect on the social process. Here, Robert Witkin unpacks Adorno's notoriously difficult critique of popular culture in an engaging (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  37.  58
    Explanatory Instability.Robert W. Batterman - 1992 - Noûs 26 (3):325-348.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  38.  49
    The Impact of Banality, Risky Shift and Escalating Commitment on Ethical Decision Making.Robert W. Armstrong, Robert J. Williams & J. Douglas Barrett - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (4):365-370.
    This paper posits that organizational variables are the factors that lead to the moral decline of companies like Enron and Worldcom. The individuals involved created environments within the organizations that precipitated a spiral of unethical decision-making. It is proposed that at the executive level, it is the organizational factors associated with power and decision-making that have the critical influence on moral and ethical behavior. The study has used variables that were deemed to be surrogate measures of the ethical violations (OSHA (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  39.  50
    Randomness and Probability in Dynamical Theories: On the Proposals of the Prigogine School.Robert W. Batterman - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (2):241-263.
    I discuss recent work in ergodic theory and statistical mechanics, regarding the compatibility and origin of random and chaotic behavior in deterministic dynamical systems. A detailed critique of some quite radical proposals of the Prigogine school is given. I argue that their conclusion regarding the conceptual bankruptcy of the classical conceptions of an exact microstate and unique phase space trajectory is not completely justified. The analogy they want to draw with quantum mechanics is not sufficiently close to support their most (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  40.  93
    Hydrodynamics Versus Molecular Dynamics: Intertheory Relations in Condensed Matter Physics.Robert W. Batterman - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (5):888-904.
    This paper considers the relationship between continuum hydrodynamics and discrete molecular dynamics in the context of explaining the behavior of breaking droplets. It is argued that the idealization of a fluid as a continuum is actually essential for a full explanation of the drop breaking phenomenon and that, therefore, the less "fundamental," emergent hydrodynamical theory plays an ineliminable role in our understanding.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  41. On the Specialness of Special Functions (the Nonrandom Effusions of the Divine Mathematician).Robert W. Batterman - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (2):263 - 286.
    This article attempts to address the problem of the applicability of mathematics in physics by considering the (narrower) question of what make the so-called special functions of mathematical physics special. It surveys a number of answers to this question and argues that neither simple pragmatic answers, nor purely mathematical classificatory schemes are sufficient. What is required is some connection between the world and the way investigators are forced to represent the world.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  42. Methodologies of Comparative Philosophy: The Pragmatist and Process Traditions.Robert W. Smid - 2009 - State University of New York Press.
    A much-needed consideration of methodology in comparative philosophy.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  43.  45
    A Multinational Comparison of Key Ethical Issues, Helps and Challenges in the Purchasing and Supply Management Profession: The Key Implciations for Business and the Professions. [REVIEW]Robert W. Copper, Garry L. Frank & Robert A. Kemp - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (1):83 - 100.
    This paper presents the findings of a study of purchasing and supply management professionals in India conducted to identify the key ethical issues they face in carrying out their work related responsibilities as well as to determine the extent to which various factors appear to be helpful or to present challenges to their efforts to act ethically in the course of their work. The Indian findings are then compared to those for studies conducted among purchasing and supply management professionals in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  44. Chaos, Quantization, and the Correspondence Principle.Robert W. Batterman - 1991 - Synthese 89 (2):189 - 227.
  45.  5
    Screen reading and the creation of new cognitive ecologies.Robert W. Clowes - 2018 - Ai and Society 34 (4):705-720.
    It has been widely argued that digital technologies are transforming the nature of reading, and with it, our brains and a wide range of our cognitive capabilities. In this article, we begin by discussing the new analytical category of deep-reading and whether it is really on the decline. We analyse deep reading and its grounding in brain reorganization, based upon Michael Anderson’s Massive Redeployment hypothesis and Dehaene’s Neuronal Recycling which both help us to theorize how the capacities of brains are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  35
    Enactivism, Radical Enactivism and Predictive Processing: What is Radical in Cognitive Science?Robert W. Clowes & Klaus Gärtner - 2017 - Kairos 18 (1):54-83.
    According to Enactivism, cognition should be understood in terms of a dynamic interaction between an acting organism and its environment. Further, this view holds that organisms do not passively receive information from this environment, they rather selectively create this environment by engaging in interaction with the world. Radical Enactivism adds that basic cognition does so without entertaining representations and hence that representations are not an essential constituent of cognition. Some proponents think that getting rid of representations amounts to a revolutionary (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  79
    The Philosophy of Animal Minds.Robert W. Lurz (ed.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is a collection of fourteen essays by leading philosophers on issues concerning the nature, existence, and our knowledge of animal minds. The nature of animal minds has been a topic of interest to philosophers since the origins of philosophy, and recent years have seen significant philosophical engagement with the subject. However, there is no volume that represents the current state of play in this important and growing field. The purpose of this volume is to highlight the state of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  48. Gramsci, Hegemony and International Relations.Robert W. Cox - 2002 - In Martin James (ed.), Antonio Gramsci. Routledge. pp. 4--2.
  49.  39
    Virtualist Representation.Robert W. Clowes & Ron Chrisley - 2012 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (2):503-522.
    This paper seeks to identify, clarify, and perhaps rehabilitate the virtual reality metaphor as applied to the goal of understanding consciousness. Some proponents of the metaphor apply it in a way that implies a representational view of experience of a particular, extreme form that is indirect, internal and inactive (what we call “presentational virtualism”). In opposition to this is an application of the metaphor that eschews representation, instead preferring to view experience as direct, external and enactive (“enactive virtualism”). This paper (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  26
    Games Without Frontiers? Democratic Engagement, Agonistic Pluralism and the Question of Exclusion.Robert W. Glover - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (1):81-104.
    In recent years a growing number of democratic theorists have proposed ways to increase citizen engagement, while channeling those democratic energies in positive directions and away from systematic marginalization, exclusion and intolerance. One novel answer is provided by a strain of democratic theory known as agonistic pluralism, which valorizes adversarial engagement and recognizes the marginalizing tendencies implicit in drives to consensus and stability. However, the divergences between competing variants of agonistic pluralism remain largely underdeveloped or unrecognized. In this article, I (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  51. Nothing found.