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  1. Are the Laws of Physics 'Economical with the Truth'?P. P. Allport - 1993 - Synthese 94 (2):245 - 290.
    It has been argued that the fundamental laws of physics are deceitful in that they give the impression of greater unity and coherence in our theories than is actually found to be the case. Causal stories and phenomenological relationships are claimed to provide a more acceptable account of the world, and only theoretical entities — not laws — are considered as perhaps corresponding to real features of the world.This paper examines these claims in the light of the author's own field (...)
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  2. Why Are the Laws of Physics the Way They Are?Stephen Ames - unknown
    Why are the laws of physics the way they are? A causal answer argues to the laws from something physically more fundamental. For example,string theory is pursuing that kind of argument. I argue for a purposive answer to our question. Why are the laws of physics the way they are? In order for the universe to be knowable through empirical inquiry by embodied rational inquirers. The argument has three parts: the physics, the move from physics to metaphysics, the metaphysics. The (...)
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  3. Vanishing Matter and the Laws of Motion: Descartes and Beyond.Peter Anstey & Dana Jalobeanu (eds.) - 2010 - Routledge.
    This volume explores the themes of vanishing matter, matter and the laws of nature, the qualities of matter, and the diversity of the debates about matter in the early modern period. Chapters are unified by a number of interlocking themes which together enable some of the broader contours of the philosophy of matter to be charted in new ways. Part I concerns Cartesian Matter; Part II covers Matter, Mechanism and Medicine; Part III covers Matter and the Laws of Motion; and (...)
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  4. Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion, Before and After Newton's Principia: An Essay on the Transformation of Scientific Problems.Brian S. Baigrie - 1987 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (2):177-208.
  5. Propensity, Probability, and Quantum Theory.Leslie E. Ballentine - 2016 - Foundations of Physics 46 (8):973-1005.
    Quantum mechanics and probability theory share one peculiarity. Both have well established mathematical formalisms, yet both are subject to controversy about the meaning and interpretation of their basic concepts. Since probability plays a fundamental role in QM, the conceptual problems of one theory can affect the other. We first classify the interpretations of probability into three major classes: inferential probability, ensemble probability, and propensity. Class is the basis of inductive logic; deals with the frequencies of events in repeatable experiments; describes (...)
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  6. Noise Reduction and Restoration-Dedicated Hardware for Real-Time Computation of Second-Order Statistical Features for High Resolution Images.Dimitris Batiamis, Dimitris K. Iakovidis & Dimitris Maroulis - 2006 - In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 4179--67.
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  7. On the Specialness of Special Functions (the Nonrandom Effusions of the Divine Mathematician).Robert W. Batterman - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (2):263 - 286.
    This article attempts to address the problem of the applicability of mathematics in physics by considering the (narrower) question of what make the so-called special functions of mathematical physics special. It surveys a number of answers to this question and argues that neither simple pragmatic answers, nor purely mathematical classificatory schemes are sufficient. What is required is some connection between the world and the way investigators are forced to represent the world.
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  8. Theories Between Theories: Asymptotic Limiting Intertheoretic Relations.Robert W. Batterman - 1995 - Synthese 103 (2):171 - 201.
    This paper addresses a relatively common scientific (as opposed to philosophical) conception of intertheoretic reduction between physical theories. This is the sense of reduction in which one (typically newer and more refined) theory is said to reduce to another (typically older and coarser) theory in the limit as some small parameter tends to zero. Three examples of such reductions are discussed: First, the reduction of Special Relativity (SR) to Newtonian Mechanics (NM) as (v/c)20; second, the reduction of wave optics to (...)
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  9. The Extension of Man: A History of Physics Before 1900.J. D. Bernal - 1972 - London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
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  10. Physics, Logic, and History.Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.) - 1970 - New York: Plenum Press.
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  11. Language, Truth and Knowledge.Thomas Bonk (ed.) - 2003 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This collection, with essays by Graham H. Bird, Jaakko Hintikka, Ilkka Niiniluoto, Jan Wolenski, will interest graduate students of the philosophy of language ...
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  12. A Response To Robert Gibbs' "Why Ethics?". [REVIEW]Eugene Borowitz - 2003 - Journal of Textual Reasoning 2 (1).
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  13. A Literary Approach to Scientific Practice.Seamus Bradley - 2011 - Metascience 20 (2):363--367.
    A literary approach to scientific practice: Essay Review of R.I.G. Hughes' _The Theoretical Practices of Physics_.
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  14. Scientific Practice: Theories and Stories of Doing Physics.Jed Z. Buchwald (ed.) - 1995 - University of Chicago Press.
    Most recent work on the nature of experiment in physics has focused on "big science"--the large-scale research addressed in Andrew Pickering's Constructing Quarks and Peter Galison's How Experiments End. This book examines small-scale experiment in physics, in particular the relation between theory and practice. The contributors focus on interactions among the people, materials, and ideas involved in experiments--factors that have been relatively neglected in science studies. The first half of the book is primarily philosophical, with contributions from Andrew Pickering, Peter (...)
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  15. Carnap on Meaning and Analyticity.Richard Butrick - 1970 - The Hague: Mouton.
  16. Between Laws and Models: Some Philosophical Morals of Lagrangian Mechanics.Jeremy Butterfield - unknown
    I extract some philosophical morals from some aspects of Lagrangian mechanics. One main moral concerns methodology: Lagrangian mechanics provides a level of description of phenomena which has been largely ignored by philosophers, since it falls between their accustomed levels---``laws of nature'' and ``models''. Another main moral concerns ontology: the ontology of Lagrangian mechanics is both more subtle and more problematic than philosophers often realize. The treatment of Lagrangian mechanics provides an introduction to the subject for philosophers, and is technically elementary. (...)
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  17. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science.Rudolf Carnap - 1974 - Dover Publications.
    Stimulating, thought-provoking text by one of the 20th century’s most creative philosophers clearly and discerningly makes accessible such topics as probability, measurement and quantitative language, structure of space, causality and determinism, theoretical laws and concepts and much more. "...the best book available for the intelligent reader who wants to gain some insight into the nature of contemporary philosophy of science."—Choice.
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  18. The Law-Governed Universe. [REVIEW]John W. Carroll - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (4):895-901.
  19. Nature's Capacities and Their Measurement.Nancy Cartwright - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    Ever since David Hume, empiricists have barred powers and capacities from nature. In this book Cartwright argues that capacities are essential in our scientific world, and, contrary to empiricist orthodoxy, that they can meet sufficiently strict demands for testability. Econometrics is one discipline where probabilities are used to measure causal capacities, and the technology of modern physics provides several examples of testing capacities (such as lasers). Cartwright concludes by applying the lessons of the book about capacities and probabilities to the (...)
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  20. How the Laws of Physics Lie.Nancy Cartwright - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    In this sequence of philosophical essays about natural science, the author argues that fundamental explanatory laws, the deepest and most admired successes of modern physics, do not in fact describe regularities that exist in nature. Cartwright draws from many real-life examples to propound a novel distinction: that theoretical entities, and the complex and localized laws that describe them, can be interpreted realistically, but the simple unifying laws of basic theory cannot.
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  21. Dualities and Intertheoretic Relations.Elena Castellani - unknown
    This is the first of two papers concerned with the philosophical significance of dualities as applied in recent fundamental physics. The general idea is that, for its peculiarity, this ‘new’ ingredient in theory construction can open unexpected perspectives in the current philosophical reflection on contemporary physics. In particular, today’s physical dualities represent an unusual type of intertheory relation, the meaning of which deserves to be investigated. The aim is to show how discussing this point brings into play, at the same (...)
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  22. Carnap and the Vienna Circle: Empiricism and Logical Syntax.Ramon Cirera (ed.) - 1994 - Rodopi.
    In Rudolph Camap (,) established himself as a professor in Vienna. The philosophical atmosphere awaiting him there was not new to him: the year before he ...
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  23. Modern Physics and Problems of Knowledge.Paul M. Clark (ed.) - 1981 - Open University Press.
    Einstein, philosophical belief and physical theory -- Introduction to quantum theory -- Quantum theory, the Bohr-Einstein debate -- Physics and society.
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  24. Chaos and Order: An Interview with Professor Michael Berry F.R.S.John Cleave & Ian J. Thompson - 1988 - Cogito 2 (1):1-5.
    Michael Berry, Professor of Physics at Bristol University, discusses the philosophical ideas underlying his research to the theories of catastrophes and chaotic systems. He is one of England's leading scientists, and has been instrumental in the growth of interest in qualitative phenomena.
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  25. Nothing: A Very Short Introduction.F. E. Close - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    This short, smart book tells you everything you need to know about " nothing." What remains when you take all the matter away? Can empty space--" nothing "--exist?
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  26. Benjamin Silliman, 1779-1864, Pathfinder in American ScienceJohn F. Fulton Elizabeth H. ThomsonThe Early Work of Willard Gibbs in Applied Mechanics, Comprising the Text of His Hitherto Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis and Accounts of His Mechanical InventionsWillard Gibbs Lynde Phelps Wheeler Everett Oyler Waters Samuel William DudleyYale Science. The First Hundred Years, 1701-1801Louis W. McKeehan. [REVIEW]I. Bernard Cohen - 1947 - Isis 38 (1/2):117-119.
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  27. BOOMERanG and the Sound of the Big Bang.John G. Cramer - unknown
    Two years ago, astrophysicists studying Type Ia supernovas discovered that our universe is a much stranger place than we had imagined, with invisible vacuum energy accelerating its expansion. (See my column about this in the May-1999 Analog.) However, new astrophysical observations from the BOOMERanG experiment (Balloon Observations Of Millimetric Extragalactic Radiation and Geomagnetics), a balloon-borne cryogenic microwave telescope measurement that flew at an altitude of about 24 miles over the Antarctic, indicate that our universe is also rather ordinary, in that (...)
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  28. Historical Fine-Mapping.Angela N. H. Creager - 2007 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (1):144-148.
  29. Philosophical Concepts in Physics: The Historical Relation Between Philosophy and Scientific Theories.James T. Cushing - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines a selection of philosophical issues in the context of specific episodes in the development of physical theories. Advances in science are presented against the historical and philosophical backgrounds in which they occurred. A major aim is to impress upon the reader the essential role that philosophical considerations have played in the actual practice of science. The book begins with some necessary introduction to the history of ancient and early modern science, with major emphasis being given to the (...)
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  30. The Matter Myth: Dramatic Discoveries That Challenge Our Understanding of Physical Reality.P. C. W. Davies - 2007 - Simon & Schuster.
    In this sweeping survey, acclaimed science writers Paul Davies and John Gribbin provide a complete overview of advances in the study of physics that have revolutionized modern science. From the weird world of quarks and the theory of relativity to the latest ideas about the birth of the cosmos, the authors find evidence for a massive paradigm shift. Developments in the studies of black holes, cosmic strings, solitons, and chaos theory challenge commonsense concepts of space, time, and matter, and demand (...)
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  31. Are Unconceived Alternatives a Problem for Scientific Realism?Michael Devitt - 2011 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 42 (2):285-293.
    Stanford, in Exceeding Our Grasp , presents a powerful version of the pessimistic meta-induction. He claims that theories typically have empirically inequivalent but nonetheless well-confirmed, serious alternatives which are unconceived. This claim should be uncontroversial. But it alone is no threat to scientific realism. The threat comes from Stanford’s further crucial claim, supported by historical examples, that a theory’s unconceived alternatives are “radically distinct” from it; there is no “continuity”. A standard realist reply to the meta-induction is that past failures (...)
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  32. Cartesian Primary Qualities in Light of Some Contemporary Physical Explanations.Mladen Domazet - 2008 - Prolegomena 7 (1):21-35.
    Descartes’ derivation of the primary qualities of matter and their role in explaining observed physical phenomena are briefly reviewed. The lesson drawn from Descartes’ methodology of explanation is that we ought to aim to reduce complex phenomena to simple unifying principles and conceptual primitives. Three proposed solutions to the apparent paradoxes in contemporary quantum physics (primarily associated with the notion of entanglement) are briefly compared with lessons taken from Descartes. It is argued that further research in this field should provide (...)
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  33. On the Reduction of Process Causality to Statistical Relations.Phil Dowe - 1993 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (2):325-327.
  34. Tracking Down Gauge: An Ode to the Constrained Hamiltonian Formalism.John Earman - 2003 - In Katherine Brading & Elena Castellani (eds.), Symmetries in Physics: Philosophical Reflections. Cambridge University Press. pp. 140--62.
    Like moths attracted to a bright light, philosophers are drawn to glitz. So in discussing the notions of ‘gauge’, ‘gauge freedom’, and ‘gauge theories’, they have tended to focus on examples such as Yang–Mills theories and on the mathematical apparatus of fibre bundles. But while Yang–Mills theories are crucial to modern elementary particle physics, they are only a special case of a much broader class of gauge theories. And while the fibre bundle apparatus turned out, in retrospect, to be the (...)
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  35. Investigations Into the Thermodynamic Concept of Temperature.Philip Ehrlich - 1979 - Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago
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  36. What Are the Phenomena of Physics?Brigitte Falkenburg - 2011 - Synthese 182 (1):149-163.
    Depending on different positions in the debate on scientific realism, there are various accounts of the phenomena of physics. For scientific realists like Bogen and Woodward, phenomena are matters of fact in nature, i.e., the effects explained and predicted by physical theories. For empiricists like van Fraassen, the phenomena of physics are the appearances observed or perceived by sensory experience. Constructivists, however, regard the phenomena of physics as artificial structures generated by experimental and mathematical methods. My paper investigates the historical (...)
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  37. Nature's Principles.Jan Faye, Paul Needham, Uwe Scheffler & Max Urchs (eds.) - 2005 - Springer.
    This volume presents a wide-ranging overview of the contemporary debate and includes some of its foremost participants.
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  38. Science, Explanation, and Rationality: Aspects of the Philosophy of Carl G. Hempel.H. Fetzer James (ed.) - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    Carl G. Hempel exerted greater influence upon philosophers of science than any other figure during the 20th century. In this far-reaching collection, distinguished philosophers contribute valuable studies that illuminate and clarify the central problems to which Hempel was devoted. The essays enhance our understanding of the development of logical empiricism as the major intellectual influence for scientifically-oriented philosophers and philosophically-minded scientists of the 20th century.
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  39. God or Multiverse?Swinburne On Fine-Tuning - 2008 - In Nicola Mößner, Sebastian Schmoranzer & Christian Weidemann (eds.), Richard Swinburne. Christian Philosophy in a Modern World. Ontos. pp. 85.
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  40. A Thermodynamic Approach to Grain Growth and Coarsening.F. D. Fischer, J. Svoboda & P. Fratzl - 2003 - Philosophical Magazine 83 (9):1075-1093.
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  41. An Original Theory of the Universe. [REVIEW]Eric Forbes - 1972 - British Journal for the History of Science 6 (1):96-96.
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  42. Quantum Gravity: Time is the Red Herring and Classical Mathematics is the Elephant in the Room.D. A. Ford - manuscript
    The concepts of Euclidean distance, or a geodesic, are of course suitable models for the practical application of measurement at classical scale. However, it will be argued here that the complete picture of the abstract geometry that intervenes two points necessarily involves a dynamical network of discrete intervals. Then measurement concepts that aim to remain valid at microscopic length scales must take account of dynamical update in that network. The abstract model developed on that basis displays characteristics analogous to quantum (...)
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  43. Explanation, Quantity and Law.John Forge - 1999
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  44. Lorentz Contraction, Bell’s Spaceships and Rigid Body Motion in Special Relativity.Jerrold Franklin - 2010 - European Journal of Physics 31:291-298.
    The meaning of Lorentz contraction in special relativity and its connection with Bell’s spaceships parable is discussed. The motion of Bell’s spaceships is then compared with the accelerated motion of a rigid body. We have tried to write this in a simple form that could be used to correct students’ misconceptions due to conflicting earlier treatments.
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  45. The New Physics for the Twenty-First Century.Gordon Fraser (ed.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Underpinning all the other branches of science, physics affects the way we live our lives, and ultimately how life itself functions. Recent scientific advances have led to dramatic reassessment of our understanding of the world around us, and made a significant impact on our lifestyle. In this book, leading international experts, including Nobel prize winners, explore the frontiers of modern physics, from the particles inside an atom to the stars that make up a galaxy, from nano-engineering and brain research to (...)
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  46. De la Fine a la Grosse Complementarity.Hubert Frere - 1950 - Dialectica 4 (1):65-67.
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  47. Of Modern Physics.Mathias Frisch - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 42:176-183.
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  48. Explanatory Structures: A Study of Concepts of Explanation in Early Physics and Philosophy.Stephen Gaukroger - 1978 - Humanities Press.
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  49. Relation Between Relativisitic Quantum Mechanics And.Han Geurdes - 1995 - Phys Rev E 51 (5):5151-5154.
    The objective of this report is twofold. In the first place it aims to demonstrate that a four-dimensional local U(1) gauge invariant relativistic quantum mechanical Dirac-type equation is derivable from the equations for the classical electromagnetic field. In the second place, the transformational consequences of this local U(1) invariance are used to obtain solutions of different Maxwell equations.
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  50. (2015) Scientific Rationality, Human Consciousness, and Pro-Religious Ideas.Alfred Gierer - manuscript
    The essay discusses immanent versus transcendent concepts in the context of the art of living, as well as the understanding of human consciousness in the context of religion. Science provides us with a far reaching understanding of natural processes, including biological evolution, but also with deep insights into its own intrinsic limitations. This is consistent with more than one interpretation on the “metatheoretical“, that is on the philosophical and cultural level, including liberal, enlightened forms of religion as well as agnostic (...)
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