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  1. Exposition and Critique of the Conceptions of Eddington Concerning the Philosophy of Physical Science. [REVIEW]P. D. M. A. - 1961 - Review of Metaphysics 15 (2):347-347.
  2. Are the Laws of Physics 'Economical with the Truth'?P. P. Allport - 1993 - Synthese 94 (2):245 - 290.
    It has been argued that the fundamental laws of physics are deceitful in that they give the impression of greater unity and coherence in our theories than is actually found to be the case. Causal stories and phenomenological relationships are claimed to provide a more acceptable account of the world, and only theoretical entities — not laws — are considered as perhaps corresponding to real features of the world.This paper examines these claims in the light of the author's own field (...)
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  3. Why Are the Laws of Physics the Way They Are?Stephen Ames - unknown
    Why are the laws of physics the way they are? A causal answer argues to the laws from something physically more fundamental. For example,string theory is pursuing that kind of argument. I argue for a purposive answer to our question. Why are the laws of physics the way they are? In order for the universe to be knowable through empirical inquiry by embodied rational inquirers. The argument has three parts: the physics, the move from physics to metaphysics, the metaphysics. The (...)
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  4. Vanishing Matter and the Laws of Motion: Descartes and Beyond.Peter Anstey & Dana Jalobeanu (eds.) - 2010 - Routledge.
    This volume explores the themes of vanishing matter, matter and the laws of nature, the qualities of matter, and the diversity of the debates about matter in the early modern period. Chapters are unified by a number of interlocking themes which together enable some of the broader contours of the philosophy of matter to be charted in new ways. Part I concerns Cartesian Matter; Part II covers Matter, Mechanism and Medicine; Part III covers Matter and the Laws of Motion; and (...)
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  5. Book Review:The Investigation of the Physical World G. Toraldo Di Francia. [REVIEW]Ric Arthur - 1983 - Philosophy of Science 50 (3):516-.
  6. Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion, Before and After Newton's Principia: An Essay on the Transformation of Scientific Problems.Brian S. Baigrie - 1987 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (2):177-208.
  7. Energy as the Basic Concept for a Unified Interpretation of Physical Phenomena.Siluan F. Baldin - 1942 - Philosophy of Science 9 (3):294-305.
  8. Propensity, Probability, and Quantum Theory.Leslie E. Ballentine - 2016 - Foundations of Physics 46 (8):973-1005.
    Quantum mechanics and probability theory share one peculiarity. Both have well established mathematical formalisms, yet both are subject to controversy about the meaning and interpretation of their basic concepts. Since probability plays a fundamental role in QM, the conceptual problems of one theory can affect the other. We first classify the interpretations of probability into three major classes: inferential probability, ensemble probability, and propensity. Class is the basis of inductive logic; deals with the frequencies of events in repeatable experiments; describes (...)
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  9. On Some Structural Aspects of Physical Problems.Aristides Baltas - 1991 - Synthese 89 (2):299 - 320.
    Bachelard's concept of the problématique is used in order to classify physical problems and their interrelations. This classification is effectuated along two dimensions. Along the horizontal dimension, physical problems are divided into the kinds that the different modes of physics' development define. These modes are themselves determined by the interplay among the conceptual system, the object and the experimentation transactions specific to physics. Along the vertical dimension, physical problems are classified according to the different stages of maturation they have to (...)
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  10. Noise Reduction and Restoration-Dedicated Hardware for Real-Time Computation of Second-Order Statistical Features for High Resolution Images.Dimitris Batiamis, Dimitris K. Iakovidis & Dimitris Maroulis - 2006 - In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 4179--67.
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  11. Einstein and the Interfaces Between History, Philosophy and Physical Learning.Irinéa de Lourdes Batista - 2005 - Scientiae Studia 3 (4):733-739.
  12. On the Specialness of Special Functions (the Nonrandom Effusions of the Divine Mathematician).Robert W. Batterman - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (2):263 - 286.
    This article attempts to address the problem of the applicability of mathematics in physics by considering the (narrower) question of what make the so-called special functions of mathematical physics special. It surveys a number of answers to this question and argues that neither simple pragmatic answers, nor purely mathematical classificatory schemes are sufficient. What is required is some connection between the world and the way investigators are forced to represent the world.
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  13. Theories Between Theories: Asymptotic Limiting Intertheoretic Relations.Robert W. Batterman - 1995 - Synthese 103 (2):171 - 201.
    This paper addresses a relatively common scientific (as opposed to philosophical) conception of intertheoretic reduction between physical theories. This is the sense of reduction in which one (typically newer and more refined) theory is said to reduce to another (typically older and coarser) theory in the limit as some small parameter tends to zero. Three examples of such reductions are discussed: First, the reduction of Special Relativity (SR) to Newtonian Mechanics (NM) as (v/c)20; second, the reduction of wave optics to (...)
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  14. On Two Mathematical Definitions of Observational Equivalence: Manifest Isomorphism and Ε - Congruence Reconsidered.Christopher Belanger - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (2):69-76.
  15. The Method of Physical Coincidences and the Scale Coordinate.Wm Bender - 1934 - Philosophy of Science 1 (3):253-272.
  16. The Extension of Man: A History of Physics Before 1900.J. D. Bernal - 1972 - London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
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  17. A Matter of Scale: The Visual Representation of Nanotechnologies.Koen Beumer - 2012 - Spontaneous Generations 6 (1):65-74.
    Scale is central to understanding nanotechnologies. These technologies are usually described as the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, with one nanometer being 10^-9 meter. At this scale, some materials gain new properties that can be used in the creation of new products. These properties may contribute to economic growth and social welfare but, conversely, they may also create negative effects, such as new risks to human health and the environment. As an emerging field whose consequences are still (...)
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  18. Physics, Logic, and History.Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.) - 1970 - New York: Plenum Press.
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  19. Language, Truth and Knowledge.Thomas Bonk (ed.) - 2003 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This collection, with essays by Graham H. Bird, Jaakko Hintikka, Ilkka Niiniluoto, Jan Wolenski, will interest graduate students of the philosophy of language ...
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  20. A Response To Robert Gibbs' "Why Ethics?". [REVIEW]Eugene Borowitz - 2003 - Journal of Textual Reasoning 2 (1).
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  21. Book Review:Scientific Method: The Hypothetico-Experimental Laboratory Procedure of the Physical Sciences James K. Feibleman. [REVIEW]Michael Bradie - 1973 - Philosophy of Science 40 (3):467-.
  22. A Literary Approach to Scientific Practice.Seamus Bradley - 2011 - Metascience 20 (2):363--367.
    A literary approach to scientific practice: Essay Review of R.I.G. Hughes' _The Theoretical Practices of Physics_.
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  23. Scientific Practice: Theories and Stories of Doing Physics.Jed Z. Buchwald (ed.) - 1995 - University of Chicago Press.
    Most recent work on the nature of experiment in physics has focused on "big science"--the large-scale research addressed in Andrew Pickering's Constructing Quarks and Peter Galison's How Experiments End. This book examines small-scale experiment in physics, in particular the relation between theory and practice. The contributors focus on interactions among the people, materials, and ideas involved in experiments--factors that have been relatively neglected in science studies. The first half of the book is primarily philosophical, with contributions from Andrew Pickering, Peter (...)
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  24. The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Physical Science.Edwin A. Burtt - 1932 - Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday.
    CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION (A) Historical Problem Suggested by the Nature of Modern Thought How curious, after all, is the way in which we moderns think about ...
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  25. Carnap on Meaning and Analyticity.Richard Butrick - 1970 - The Hague: Mouton.
  26. Between Laws and Models: Some Philosophical Morals of Lagrangian Mechanics.Jeremy Butterfield - unknown
    I extract some philosophical morals from some aspects of Lagrangian mechanics. One main moral concerns methodology: Lagrangian mechanics provides a level of description of phenomena which has been largely ignored by philosophers, since it falls between their accustomed levels---``laws of nature'' and ``models''. Another main moral concerns ontology: the ontology of Lagrangian mechanics is both more subtle and more problematic than philosophers often realize. The treatment of Lagrangian mechanics provides an introduction to the subject for philosophers, and is technically elementary. (...)
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  27. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science.Rudolf Carnap - 1974 - Dover Publications.
    Stimulating, thought-provoking text by one of the 20th century’s most creative philosophers clearly and discerningly makes accessible such topics as probability, measurement and quantitative language, structure of space, causality and determinism, theoretical laws and concepts and much more. "...the best book available for the intelligent reader who wants to gain some insight into the nature of contemporary philosophy of science."—Choice.
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  28. John T. Roberts: The Law-Governed Universe. [REVIEW]J. W. Carroll - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (4):895-901.
  29. Nature's Capacities and Their Measurement.Nancy Cartwright - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    Ever since David Hume, empiricists have barred powers and capacities from nature. In this book Cartwright argues that capacities are essential in our scientific world, and, contrary to empiricist orthodoxy, that they can meet sufficiently strict demands for testability. Econometrics is one discipline where probabilities are used to measure causal capacities, and the technology of modern physics provides several examples of testing capacities (such as lasers). Cartwright concludes by applying the lessons of the book about capacities and probabilities to the (...)
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  30. How the Laws of Physics Lie.Nancy Cartwright - 1983 - Oxford University Press.
    In this sequence of philosophical essays about natural science, the author argues that fundamental explanatory laws, the deepest and most admired successes of modern physics, do not in fact describe regularities that exist in nature. Cartwright draws from many real-life examples to propound a novel distinction: that theoretical entities, and the complex and localized laws that describe them, can be interpreted realistically, but the simple unifying laws of basic theory cannot.
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  31. Dualities and Intertheoretic Relations.Elena Castellani - unknown
    This is the first of two papers concerned with the philosophical significance of dualities as applied in recent fundamental physics. The general idea is that, for its peculiarity, this ‘new’ ingredient in theory construction can open unexpected perspectives in the current philosophical reflection on contemporary physics. In particular, today’s physical dualities represent an unusual type of intertheory relation, the meaning of which deserves to be investigated. The aim is to show how discussing this point brings into play, at the same (...)
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  32. The Problem of Form and Content in Physical Science.Probas Jiban Choudhury - 1949 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 10 (2):229-237.
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  33. Carnap and the Vienna Circle: Empiricism and Logical Syntax.Ramon Cirera (ed.) - 1994 - Rodopi.
    In Rudolph Camap (,) established himself as a professor in Vienna. The philosophical atmosphere awaiting him there was not new to him: the year before he ...
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  34. Modern Physics and Problems of Knowledge.Paul M. Clark (ed.) - 1981 - Open University Press.
    Einstein, philosophical belief and physical theory -- Introduction to quantum theory -- Quantum theory, the Bohr-Einstein debate -- Physics and society.
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  35. Chaos and Order: An Interview with Professor Michael Berry F.R.S.John Cleave & Ian J. Thompson - 1988 - Cogito 2 (1):1-5.
    Michael Berry, Professor of Physics at Bristol University, discusses the philosophical ideas underlying his research to the theories of catastrophes and chaotic systems. He is one of England's leading scientists, and has been instrumental in the growth of interest in qualitative phenomena.
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  36. Nothing: A Very Short Introduction.F. E. Close - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    This short, smart book tells you everything you need to know about " nothing." What remains when you take all the matter away? Can empty space--" nothing "--exist?
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  37. Benjamin Silliman, 1779-1864, Pathfinder in American ScienceJohn F. Fulton Elizabeth H. ThomsonThe Early Work of Willard Gibbs in Applied Mechanics, Comprising the Text of His Hitherto Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis and Accounts of His Mechanical InventionsWillard Gibbs Lynde Phelps Wheeler Everett Oyler Waters Samuel William DudleyYale Science. The First Hundred Years, 1701-1801Louis W. McKeehan. [REVIEW]I. Bernard Cohen - 1947 - Isis 38 (1/2):117-119.
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  38. Mechanism and Causality in Physics.Morris Raphael Cohen - 1918 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (14):365-386.
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  39. BOOMERanG and the Sound of the Big Bang.John G. Cramer - unknown
    Two years ago, astrophysicists studying Type Ia supernovas discovered that our universe is a much stranger place than we had imagined, with invisible vacuum energy accelerating its expansion. (See my column about this in the May-1999 Analog.) However, new astrophysical observations from the BOOMERanG experiment (Balloon Observations Of Millimetric Extragalactic Radiation and Geomagnetics), a balloon-borne cryogenic microwave telescope measurement that flew at an altitude of about 24 miles over the Antarctic, indicate that our universe is also rather ordinary, in that (...)
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  40. Historical Fine-Mapping.Angela N. H. Creager - 2007 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (1):144-148.
  41. Emergent Spacetime According to Effective Field Theory: From Top-Down and Bottom-Up.Karen Crowther - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (3):321-328.
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  42. The Superiority of the Copernican System: A Reply to Chalmers.Martin Curd - 1983 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 34 (4):367-369.
  43. Philosophical Concepts in Physics: The Historical Relation Between Philosophy and Scientific Theories.James T. Cushing - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines a selection of philosophical issues in the context of specific episodes in the development of physical theories. Advances in science are presented against the historical and philosophical backgrounds in which they occurred. A major aim is to impress upon the reader the essential role that philosophical considerations have played in the actual practice of science. The book begins with some necessary introduction to the history of ancient and early modern science, with major emphasis being given to the (...)
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  44. Book Review:Discipline and Experience: The Mathematical Way in the Scientific Revolution Peter Dear. [REVIEW]Lorraine Daston - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (3):519-.
  45. The Matter Myth: Dramatic Discoveries That Challenge Our Understanding of Physical Reality.P. C. W. Davies - 2007 - Simon & Schuster.
    In this sweeping survey, acclaimed science writers Paul Davies and John Gribbin provide a complete overview of advances in the study of physics that have revolutionized modern science. From the weird world of quarks and the theory of relativity to the latest ideas about the birth of the cosmos, the authors find evidence for a massive paradigm shift. Developments in the studies of black holes, cosmic strings, solitons, and chaos theory challenge commonsense concepts of space, time, and matter, and demand (...)
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  46. Are Unconceived Alternatives a Problem for Scientific Realism?Michael Devitt - 2011 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 42 (2):285-293.
    Stanford, in Exceeding Our Grasp , presents a powerful version of the pessimistic meta-induction. He claims that theories typically have empirically inequivalent but nonetheless well-confirmed, serious alternatives which are unconceived. This claim should be uncontroversial. But it alone is no threat to scientific realism. The threat comes from Stanford’s further crucial claim, supported by historical examples, that a theory’s unconceived alternatives are “radically distinct” from it; there is no “continuity”. A standard realist reply to the meta-induction is that past failures (...)
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  47. Cartesian Primary Qualities in Light of Some Contemporary Physical Explanations.Mladen Domazet - 2008 - Prolegomena 7 (1):21-35.
    Descartes’ derivation of the primary qualities of matter and their role in explaining observed physical phenomena are briefly reviewed. The lesson drawn from Descartes’ methodology of explanation is that we ought to aim to reduce complex phenomena to simple unifying principles and conceptual primitives. Three proposed solutions to the apparent paradoxes in contemporary quantum physics (primarily associated with the notion of entanglement) are briefly compared with lessons taken from Descartes. It is argued that further research in this field should provide (...)
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  48. On the Reduction of Process Causality to Statistical Relations.Phil Dowe - 1993 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (2):325-327.
  49. Cellular Dimensions and Cell Dynamics, or the Difficulty Over Capturing Time and Space in the Era of Electron Microscopy.Ariane Dröscher - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (4):395-402.
  50. Teoria fisica y experimento.Pierre Duhem - 1984 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 14 (3-4):547-582.
1 — 50 / 455