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  1. Howard Adelman (2009). Research on the Ethics of War in the Context of Violence in Gaza. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (1-2):93-113.
    The paper first demonstrates the ability to provode objective data and analyses during war and then examines the need for such objective gathering of data and analysis in the context of mass violence and war, specifically in the 2009 Gaza War. That data and analysis is required to assess compliance with just war norms in assessing the conduct of the war, a framework quite distinct from human rights norms that can misapply and deform the application of norms such as proportionality (...)
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  2. Alain Badiou (2006). Polemics. Verso.
    PT. 1. PHILOSOPHY AND CIRCUMSTANCES: Introduction -- Philosophy and the question of war today: 1. On September 11 2001: philosophy and the 'War against terrorism' -- 2. Fragments of a public journal on the American war against Iraq -- 3. On the war against Serbia: who strikes whom in the world today? -- The 'democratic' fetish and racism: 4. On parliamentary 'democracy': the French presidential elections of 2002 -- 5. The law on the Islamic headscarf -- 6. Daily humiliation -- (...)
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  3. Etienne Balibar (2008). What's in a War? (Politics as War, War as Politics). Ratio Juris 21 (3):365-386.
    Abstract. This paper combines reflections on the current "state of war" in the Middle East with an epistemological discussion of the meaning and implications of the category "war" itself, in order to dissipate the confusions arising from the idea of a "War on Terror." The first part illustrates the insufficiency of the ideal type involved in dichotomies which are implicit in the naming and classifications of wars. They point nevertheless to a deeper problem which concerns the antinomic character of a (...)
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  4. A. D. Barder & F. Debrix (2011). Agonal Sovereignty: Rethinking War and Politics with Schmitt, Arendt and Foucault. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (7):775-793.
    The notion of biopolitical sovereignty and the theory of the state of exception are perspectives derived from Carl Schmitt’s thought and Michel Foucault’s writings that have been popularized by critical political theorists like Giorgio Agamben and Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri of late. This article argues that these perspectives are not sufficient analytical points of departure for a critique of the contemporary politics of terror, violence and war marked by a growing global exploitation of bodies, tightened management of life, and (...)
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  5. Robin Blackburn (2002). The Imperial Presidency, the War on Terrorism, and the Revolutions of Modernity. Constellations 9 (1):3-33.
    It is inherent in the concept of a terrorist act that it aims at an effect very much larger than the direct physical destruction it causes. Proponents of what used to be called the 'propaganda of the deed' also believed that in the illuminating glare of terror the vulnerability of a corrupt ...
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  6. Reginald Bretnor (1992). Of Force and Violence and Other Imponderables: Essays on War, Politics, and Government. Borgo Press.
  7. J. Daryl Charles (2006). War, Women, and Political Wisdom: Jean Bethke Elshtain on the Contours of Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (2):339 - 369.
    One of the most perceptive and ambidextrous social commentators of our day, Augustinian scholar Jean Bethke Elshtain furnishes in ever fresh ways through her writings a bridge between the ancient and the modern, between politics and ethics, between timeless moral wisdom and cultural sensitivity. To read Elshtain seriously is to take the study of culture as well as the "permanent things" seriously. But Elshtain is no mere moralist. Neither is she content solely to dwell in the domain of the theoretical. (...)
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  8. Yvonne Chiu (2010). Uniform Exceptions and Rights Violations. Social Theory and Practice 36 (1):44-77.
    Non-uniformed combat morally infringes on civilians’ fundamental right to immunity and exacts an impermissible form of unofficial conscription that is morally prohibited even if the civilians knowingly consent to it. It is often argued that revolutionary groups burdened by resource disparities relative to the state or who claim alternative sources of political legitimacy (such as national self-determination or the constitution of a political collective) are justified in using unconventional tactics such as non-uniformed combat. Neither those reasons nor the provision of (...)
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  9. Michele Chwastiak (2007). War, Incorporated. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:383-388.
    War is being privatized at an accelerating rate. This paper suggests that the benefits from privatizing war accrue to the political and economic elite in thatprivatization reduces the political costs of war, allows for state crimes to be committed by proxy, turns war into a free crime zone, and has created new opportunities for war profiteering. However, the benefits to the political and economic elite are not without their costs to the remainder of the population. The capital accumulation process impels (...)
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  10. Christine Chwaszcza (2008). Review of C. A. J. Coady, Morality and Political Violence. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).
  11. Ian Clark (1988). Waging War: A Philosophical Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    What is war, and how should it be waged? Are there restraints on its conduct? What can philosophers contribute to the study of warfare? Arguing that the practice of war requires a sound philosophical understanding, Ian Clark writes a fascinating synthesis of the philosophy, history, political theory, and contemporary strategy of warfare. Examining the traditional doctrines of the "just" and the "limited" war with fresh insight, Clark also addresses the applicability of these ideas to the modern issues of war crimes, (...)
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  12. Christopher Coker (2008). Ethics and War in the 21st Century. Routledge.
    Preface 1. Fighting Terrorism 1:1. A new Discourse on War? 1:2. Richard Rorty and the Ethics of War 2. Etiquettes of Atrocity 2:1. Etiquettes of Atrocity 2:2. Discourses on War 2:3. Keeping the discourse: the United States and Vietnam 2.4. Carl Schmitt and the theory of the Partisan 3. Changing the Discourse 3:1 Germany and the Eastern Front 1941-5 3:2 France and Algeria 1955-8 3:3 Israel and the Intifada 3:4 Conclusion 4. A New Discourse? 4:1. The War on Terror -- (...)
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  13. Rory J. Conces, Book Review: To End a War. [REVIEW]
    [1] If asked to name career diplomats who have tackled some very difficult international crises, many foreign policy makers would put Richard Holbrooke near the top of the list. Not many negotiators have wielded moral principle, power, and reason as well as Holbrooke. His book on the Bosnia negotiations leading up to the 1995 Dayton Peace Agreement is timely, given the ethnic cleansing that is being carried out in Kosovo, a southern province of Yugoslavia's Serb Republic. Once again we are (...)
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  14. ĖV Demenchonok (ed.) (2009). Between Global Violence and the Ethics of Peace: Philosophical Perspectives. John Wiley & Sons.
  15. Lawrence Dennis (1980/1975). The Dynamics of War and Revolution. Institute for Historical Review.
  16. Heinz Duchhardt (1984). Revolution and Universal Civil War. Studies on the Overture After 1789. Philosophy and History 17 (1):86-86.
  17. Hans-Jürgen Eitner (1988). The Costs of Hitler's War. War Funding and the Financial Legacy of the War in Germany, 1933–1948. Philosophy and History 21 (1):61-62.
  18. Woody Evans (2007). Singularity Warfare: A Bibliometric Survey of Militarized Transhumanism. Journal of Evolution and Technology 16 (1):161-65.
    This paper examines the responses to advanced and transformative technologies in military literature, attenuates the conclusions of earlier work suggesting that there is an “ignorance of transhumanism” in the military, and updates the current layout of transhuman concerns in military thought. The military is not ignorant of transhuman issues and implications, though there was evidence for this in the past; militaries and non-state actors (including terrorists) increasingly use disruptive technologies with what we may call transhuman provenance.
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  19. Cécile Fabre (2012). Cosmopolitan War. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- Cosmopolitanism -- Collective self-defense -- Subsistence wars -- Humanitarian intervention -- Commodified wars -- Asymmetrical wars -- Conclusion.
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  20. Joseph R. Frese (1943). The Hierarchy and Peace in the War of Secession. Thought 18 (2):293-305.
  21. Douglas P. Fry (2009). Beyond War: The Human Potential for Peace. OUP USA.
    A profoundly heartening view of human nature, Beyond War offers a hopeful prognosis for a future without war. Douglas P. Fry convincingly argues that our ancient ancestors were not innately warlike--and neither are we. He points out that, for perhaps ninety-nine percent of our history, for well over a million years, humans lived in nomadic hunter-and-gatherer groups, egalitarian bands where warfare was a rarity. Drawing on archaeology and fascinating recent fieldwork on hunter-gatherer bands from around the world, Fry debunks the (...)
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  22. M. A. Gareev (1998). If War Comes Tomorrow?: The Contours of Future Armed Conflict. Frank Cass.
    Military affairs have been affected by major changes in the 19902. The bipolar world of two superpowers has gone. The Cold War and the global military confrontation that accompanied it have ended. A new military and political order has emerged, but the world has not become more stable, indeed, wars and armed conflict have become much more common. Forecasting the contours of future armed conflict is the primary object of this work. Focusing on the impact of new technologies, General Gareev (...)
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  23. Nolen Gertz (2008). Just and Unjust Killing. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (4):247-261.
    To provide a way to understand warfare and debate military conduct, Michael Walzer's Just and Unjust Wars tries to show that civilians and soldiers are not separated by a barrier of violence as we might think, but rather inhabit the same moral world. While this view enables us to question and criticize our leaders during times of war instead of simply claiming ignorance, its success is gained by obscuring certain fundamental boundaries that exist between combatants and noncombatants. By comparing Walzer's (...)
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  24. José L. Gómez del Prado (2012). A U.N. Convention to Regulate PMSCs? Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (3):262-286.
    Abstract In the last 20 years the ruthless competition for natural resources, political instability, armed conflicts, and the terrorist attacks of 9/11 have paved the way for private military and security companies (PMSCs) to operate in areas which were until recently the preserve of the state. PMSCs, less regulated than the toy industry, commit grave human rights violations with impunity. The United Nations has elaborated an international binding instrument to regulate their activities but the opposition of the U.S., U.K., and (...)
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  25. Yuval N. Harari (2008). The Ultimate Experience: Battlefield Revelations and the Making of Modern War Culture, 1450-2000. Palgrave Macmillan.
    For millennia, war was viewed as a supreme test. In the period 1750-1850 war became much more than a test: it became a secular revelation. This new understanding of war as revelation completely transformed Western war culture, revolutionizing politics, the personal experience of war, the status of common soldiers, and the tenets of military theory.
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  26. William James (1906). The Moral Equivalent of War. Association for International Concilliation 27.
    The war against war is going to be no holiday excursion or camping party. The military feelings are too deeply grounded to abdicate their place among our ideals until better substitutes are offered than the glory and shame that come to nations as well as to individuals from the ups and downs of politics and the vicissitudes of trade. There is something highly paradoxical in the modern man's relation to war. Ask all our millions, north and south, whether they would (...)
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  27. Tomis Kapitan, Reality and Rhetoric in the War on Terror.
    Let me begin with definition. Many observers have pointed out that despite the fact that for over three decades, “terrorism” has been deemed a threat to the civilized world, to democratic values, or to “our way of life,” and despite the fact that our country is now engaged in a “war on terror,” there is no universally agreed upon definition of terrorism—not even the various agencies within the U.S. Government are agreed—and, hence, there is no clarity about what we are (...)
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  28. Michael J. Kelar (1993). Book Review:Lines in the Sand: Justice and the Gulf War. Alan Geyer, Barbara G. Green; Ethics and the Gulf War: Religion, Rhetoric, and Righteousness. Kenneth L. Vaux; Engulfed in War: Just War and the Persian Gulf. Brien Hallett. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (1):190-.
  29. Douglas Kellner (1993). Minima Moralia: The Gulf War in Fragments. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (2):68-88.
  30. Nelson Maldonado Torres (2008). Against War: Views From the Underside of Modernity. Duke University Press.
    Introduction: Western modernity and the paradigm of war -- Searching for ethics in a violent world : a Jewish response to the paradigm of war -- From liberalism to Hitlerism : tracing the origins of violence and war -- From fraternity to altericity, or reason in the service of love -- Of masters and slaves, or Frantz Fanon and the ethico-political struggle for non-sexist human fraternity -- God and the other in the self-recognition of imperial man -- Recognition from below (...)
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  31. Nick Mansfield (2008). No Peace Without War, No War Without Peace : Deconstructing War. In Nicole Anderson & Katrina Schlunke (eds.), Cultural Theory in Everyday Practice. Oxford University Press.
  32. Larry May & Emily Crookston (eds.) (2008). War: Essays in Political Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    War has been a key topic of speculation and theorizing ever since the invention of philosophy in classical antiquity. This anthology brings together the work of distinguished contemporary political philosophers and theorists who address the leading normative and conceptual issues concerning war. The book is divided into three parts: initiating war, waging war, and ending war. The contributors aim to provide a comprehensive introduction to each of these main areas of dispute concerning war. Each essay is an original contribution to (...)
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  33. Mark Neocleous (1996). Perpetual War, or 'War and War Again': Schmitt, Foucault, Fascism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (2):47-66.
    This article seeks to explore the way that warfare, and categories gleaned from warfare and military practice, are used in the work of Carl Schmitt and Michel Foucault. Despite their profound political and theoretical differences both writers seek to understand politics and society through the idea of war. Because both writers resist the use of the state-civil society distinction their account of war renders it a perpetual phenomenon of the social and political order; this creates difficulties concerning fascism, though for (...)
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  34. Peter Olsthoorn (2010). Military Ethics and Virtues: An Interdisciplinary Approach for the 21st Century. Routledge.
  35. Bat-Ami Bar On (2008). The Opposition of Politics and War. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 141-154.
    At stake for this essay is the distinction between politics and war and the extent to which politics can survive war. Gender analysis reveals how high these stakes are by revealing the complexity of militarism. It also reveals the impossibility of gender identity as foundation for a more robust politics with respect to war. Instead, a non-ideal normative differentiation among kinds of violence is affirmed as that which politically cannot not be wanted.
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  36. Brian Orend, War. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    War should be understood as an actual, intentional and widespread armed conflict between political communities. Thus, fisticuffs between individual persons do not count as a war, nor does a gang fight, nor does a feud on the order of the Hatfields versus the McCoys. War is a phenomenon which occurs only between political communities, defined as those entities which either are states or intend to become states (in order to allow for civil war). Classical war is international war, a war (...)
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  37. Danielle Poe (2010). Women as Weapons of War: Iraq, Sex, and the Media. By KELLY OLIVER. Hypatia 25 (2):469-472.
  38. Klaus-Jörg Ruhl (1983). War and Risk of War. Essays on German Policy in the First World War. Philosophy and History 16 (1):88-88.
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  39. Hannes Rusch (2014). The Two Sides of Warfare: An Extended Model of Altruistic Behavior in Ancestral Human Intergroup Conflict. Human Nature: (online first).
    Building on and partially refining previous theoretical work, this paper presents an extended simulation model of ancestral warfare. This model (1) disentangles attack and defense, (2) tries to differentiate more strictly between selfish and altruistic efforts during war, (3) incorporates risk aversion and deterrence, and (4) pays special attention to the role of brutality. Modeling refinements and simulation results yield a differentiated picture of possible evolutionary dynamics. The main observations are: (i) Altruism in this model is more likely to evolve (...)
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  40. Hannes Rusch (2013). Asymmetries in Altruistic Behavior During Violent Intergroup Conflict. Evolutionary Psychology 11 (5):973-993.
    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of altruistic behavior in intergroup conflict in humans frequently make use of the assumption that warfare can be modeled as a symmetrical n-person prisoner’s dilemma, abstracting away the strategic differences between attack and defense. In contrast, some empirical studies on intergroup conflict in hunter-gatherer societies and chimpanzees indicate that fitness relevant risks and potential benefits of attacks and defenses might have differed substantially under ancestral conditions. Drawing on these studies, it is hypothesized that the success (...)
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  41. Gerhard Schulz (1982). Pearl Harbor, 7th December 1941. The Outbreak of War Between Japan and the United States and the Expansion of the European War Into the Second World War. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 15 (1):65-67.
  42. Martin Shaw (2005). The New Western Way of War: Risk-Transfer War and its Crisis in Iraq. Polity.
    The new western way of war from Vietnam in Iraq -- Theories of the new western way of war -- The global surveillance mode of warfare -- Rules of risk-transfer war -- Iraq: risk economy of a war -- A way of war in crisis.
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  43. Eileen Sowerby (1997). On War: Men, War, and Women. Wantok.
  44. Hidemi Suganami (1996). On the Causes of War. Oxford University Press.
    In this highly original and important book, the author analyzes one of the fundamental questions of international relations: what causes war? Drawing on historical, statistical, and philosophical perspectives to produce an innovative theory, the author rejects the simplistic notion that war can be explained by some straightforward formula, yet demonstrates that there are basic similarities among the diverse origins of wars. Comparing various narrative accounts of the origins of wars, the author shows that enquiry into the causes of war is (...)
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  45. Henrik Syse (2010). The Platonic Roots of Just War Doctrine: A Reading of Plato’s Republic. Diametros 23:104-123.
    Plato arguably stands as one of the precursors to what we today know as the Just War Tradition, and he has more to say about ethics and the use of force than what is often acknowledged. In this article I try to show, by analyzing selected passages and perspectives from the Republic, that Plato regards the role of military ethics as crucial in the construction of the ideal city, and he sees limitation of brutality and more generally a philosophical approach (...)
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  46. François Tanguay-Renaud (2013). Basic Challenges for Governance in Emergencies. In Alice MacLachlan & C. Allen Speight (eds.), Justice, Responsibility, and Reconciliation in the Wake of Conflict. Springer.
    What are emergencies and why do they matter? In this chapter (in its penultimate version), I seek to outline the morally significant features of the concept of emergency, and demonstrate how these features generate corresponding first- and second-order challenges and responsibilities for those in a position to do something about them. In section A, I contend that emergencies are situations in which there is a risk of serious harm and a need to react urgently if that harm is to be (...)
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  47. John A. Vasquez (1993). The War Puzzle. Cambridge University Press.
    This book constructs a new scientific explanation of the causes of war. The author describes systematically those factors common to wars between equal states to see if there is a pattern that suggests why war occurs and delineates the typical path by which relatively equal states have become embroiled in wars with one another in the modern global system. The book differs from others in that it employs the large number of empirical findings generated in the past twenty-five years to (...)
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  48. Jessica Wolfendale (2011). &Quot;new Wars", Terrorism, and Just War Theory. In Jessica Wolfendale & Paolo Tripodi (eds.), New Wars and New Soldiers: Military Ethics in the Contemporary World. Ashgate.
  49. Jessica Wolfendale & Paolo Tripodi (eds.) (2011/2012). New Wars and New Soldiers: Military Ethics in the Contemporary World. Ashgate.
  50. Tomasz Zuradzki (2010). Ethics on War, Terrorism and Political Violence. Diametros 23:1-4.