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  1. Klaus Abels (2013). Comments on Hornstein. Mind and Language 28 (4):421-429.
  2. Louise Antony (2008). Meta-Linguistics: Methodology and Ontology in Devitt's Ignorance of Language. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):643 – 656.
    (2008). Meta-Linguistics: Methodology and Ontology in Devitt's Ignorance of Language. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 86, No. 4, pp. 643-656.
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  3. E. Bach (1965). Structural Linguistics and the Philosophy of Science. Diogenes 13 (51):111-128.
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  4. Edison Barrios (2015). Simple is Not Easy. Synthese:1-45.
    I review and challenge the views on simplicity and its role in linguistics put forward by Ludlow (2011). In particular, I criticize the claim that simplicity—in the sense pertinent to science—is nothing more than ease of use or “user-friendliness”, motivated by economy of (cognitive) labor. I argue that Ludlow’s discussion fails to do justice to the diversity of factors that are relevant to simplicity considerations. This, in turn, leads to the neglect of crucial cases in which the rationale for simplification (...)
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  5. T. Bearth (2001). Antoine Culioli: Cognition and Representation in Linguistic Theory. Pragmatics and Cognition 9 (1):135-146.
  6. Edward G. Belaga (2008). In the Beginning Was the Verb: The Emergence and Evolution of Language Problem in the Light of the Big Bang Epistemological Paradigm. Cognitive Philology 1 (1).
    The enigma of the Emergence of Natural Languages, coupled or not with the closely related problem of their Evolution is perceived today as one of the most important scientific problems. The purpose of the present study is actually to outline such a solution to our problem which is epistemologically consonant with the Big Bang solution of the problem of the Emergence of the Universe}. Such an outline, however, becomes articulable, understandable, and workable only in a drastically extended epistemic and scientific (...)
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  7. C. Boeckx & N. Hornstein (2007). Les differents objectifs de la linguistique theorique. In Jean Bricmont & Julie Franck (eds.), Cahier Chomsky. L'herne 61--77.
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  8. Cedric Boeckx (2013). Biolinguistics and the Foundations of a Natural Science of Language. Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):193-204.
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  9. Cedric Boeckx (2006). Linguistic Minimalism: Origins, Concepts, Methods, and Aims. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Minimalist Program for linguistic theory is Noam Chomsky's boldest and most radical version of his naturalistic approach to language. Cedric Boeckz examines its foundations, explains its underlying philosophy, exemplifies its methods, and considers the significance of its empirical results. He explores the roots and antecedents of the Program and shows how its methodologies parallel those of sciences such as physics and biology. He disentangles and clarifies current debates and issues around the nature of minimalist research in linguistics and shows (...)
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  10. E. J. Borowski (1977). SAMPSON, G. "The Form of Language". [REVIEW] Mind 86:463.
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  11. Tilman Borsche (1975). Philosophy and Linguistic Theory. Philosophy and History 8 (2):219-222.
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  12. Rudolf P. Botha (1972). The Function of the Lexicon in Transformational Generative Grammar. Foundations of Language 8 (2):298-303.
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  13. Lajos L. Brons (2014). Language Death and Diversity: Philosophical and Linguistic Implications. The Science of Mind 52:243-260.
    This paper presents a simple model to estimate the number of languages that existed throughout history, and considers philosophical and linguistic implications of the findings. The estimated number is 150,000 plus or minus 50,000. Because only few of those remain, and there is no reason to believe that that remainder is a statistically representative sample, we should be very cautious about universalistic claims based on existing linguistic variation.
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  14. Cecil H. Brown (1974). Wittgensteinian Linguistics. Mouton.
  15. M. J. Cain (2010). Linguistics, Psychology and the Scientific Study of Language. Dialectica 64 (3):385-404.
    In this paper I address the issue of the subject matter of linguistics. According to the prominent Chomskyan view, linguistics is the study of the language faculty, a component of the mind-brain, and is therefore a branch of cognitive psychology. In his recent book Ignorance of Language Michael Devitt attacks this psychologistic conception of linguistics. I argue that the prominent Chomskyan objections to Devitt's position are not decisive as they stand. However, Devitt's position should ultimately be rejected as there is (...)
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  16. A. Charles Catania (1972). Chomsky's Formal Analysis of Natural Languages: A Behavioral Translation. Behaviorism 1 (1):1-15.
  17. Nick Chater & Morten H. Christiansen (2007). Two Views of Simplicity in Linguistic Theory: Which Connects Better with Cognitive Science? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):324-326.
  18. Nick Chater & Christopher D. Manning (2006). Linguistics, Computational Linguistics and Cognitive Science. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (7):335-344.
  19. Noam Chomsky (2007). Biolinguistic Explorations: Design, Development, Evolution. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (1):1 – 21.
    Biolinguistic inquiry investigates the human language faculty as an internal biological property. This article traces the development of biolinguistics from its early philosophical origins through its reformulation during the cognitive revolution of the 1950s and outlines my views on where the biolinguistic enterprise stands today. The growth of language in the individual, it is suggested, depends on (i) genetic factors, (ii) experience, and (iii) principles that are not specific to the faculty of language. The best current explanation of how language (...)
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  20. Noam Chomsky (1994). Naturalism and Dualism in the Study of Language and Mind. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 2 (2):181 – 209.
  21. Noam Chomsky (1975). Studies on Semantics in Generative Grammar. Foundations of Language 12 (3):367-382.
  22. Noam Chomsky (1970). Problems of Explanation in Linguistics. In Robert Borger (ed.), Explanation in the Behavioural Sciences. Cambridge University Press 425--451.
  23. Noam A. Chomsky (1980). Rules and Representations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (127):1-61.
    The book from which these sections are excerpted is concerned with the prospects for assimilating the study of human intelligence and its products to the natural sciences through the investigation of cognitive structures, understood as systems of rules and representations that can be regarded as These mental structui′es serve as the vehicles for the exercise of various capacities. They develop in the mind on the basis of an innate endowment that permits the growth of rich and highly articulated structures along (...)
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  24. Noam A. Chomsky (1976). Reflections On Language. Temple Smith.
  25. John Collins (2014). Representations Without Representa: Content and Illusion in Linguistic Theory. In Piotr Stalmaszczyk (ed.), Semantics and Beyond: Philosophical and Linguistic Inquiries. De Gruyter 27-64.
  26. John Collins (2013). The Philosophy of Generative Linguistics, by Peter Ludlow. Mind 122 (488):1150-1156.
  27. John Collins (2007). Review of Devitt 2006b. [REVIEW] Mind 116:416-23.
  28. John Collins, Robert J. Matthews, Barry C. Smith & Brian Epstein (2008). Philosophy of Linguistics. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 8 (22).
  29. Linguistic Competence (1985). N. Chomsky. In Jerrold J. Katz (ed.), The Philosophy of Linguistics. Oxford University Press 80.
  30. Adrian Constantinescu (2009). The Chomskyan Version of Generative Grammar. Analysis and Metaphysics 8:84-88.
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  31. Dean Elton Cook (1981). Chomsky: Towards a Rationalist Philosophy of Science. Dissertation, University of Missouri - Columbia
    The focus of this study is on the methodological aspects of Chomsky's linguistic theory. By explicating the philosophy of science implicit in Chomsky's work, a framework is provided that not only clarifies the logical structure of Chomsky's thought but also places his philosophical assumptions on a firm foundation. ;Chomsky's philosophy of science is interpreted as a rationalist synthesis of four basic conceptions of the natural and human sciences. From logical positivism Chomsky derives his formalism, which asserts that explanations in science (...)
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  32. Fiona Cowie (1994). Innate Ideas. Dissertation, Princeton University
    Recent years have seen a renewal of the perennial debate concerning innate ideas: Noam Chomsky has argued that much of our knowledge of natural languages is innate; Jerry Fodor has defended the innateness of most concepts. ;Part One concerns the historical controversy over nativism. On the interpretation there developed, nativists have defended two distinct theses. One, based on arguments from the poverty of the stimulus, is a psychological theory postulating special-purpose learning mechanisms. The other, deriving from arguments entailing that learning (...)
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  33. William Croft (2009). Syntax is More Diverse, and Evolutionary Linguistics is Already Here. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):453-454.
    Evans & Levinson (E&L) perform a major service for cognitive science. The assumption of Chomskyan generative linguistics is empirically untenable. However, E&L are too reluctant to abandon word classes and grammatical relations in syntax. Also, a cognitive scientist can already draw on a substantial linguistics literature on variationist, evolutionary models of language.
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  34. Jan Crosthwaite (1983). On The Theoretical Representation Of Linguistic Ability. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 64 (2):151.
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  35. F. B. D'agostino (1976). Rethinking Transformational Linguistics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):275-287.
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  36. Richard Daly (1972). On Arguments Against the Empirical Adequacy of Finite State Grammar. Philosophy of Science 39 (4):461-475.
    In the first part of this paper, two arguments, one by Chomsky, and one by Bar-Hillel and Shamir, are examined in detail and rejected. Both arguments purport to show that the structure of English precludes its having a finite state grammar which correctly enumerates just the well formed sentences of English. In the latter part of the paper I consider the problem of supporting claims about the structure and properties of a natural language when no grammar for the language has (...)
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  37. A. Das Gupta (1984). An Ambiguity in the Paradigm: A Critique of Cartesian Linguistics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (3):351-366.
  38. Hayley G. Davis (2003). Rethinking Linguistics. Routledgecurzon.
    This book deals with the need to rethink the aims and methods of contemporary linguistics. Orthodox linguists' discussions of linguistic form fail to exemplify how language users become language makers. Integrationist theory is used here as a solution to this basic problem within general linguistics. The book is aimed at an interdisciplinary readership, comprising those engaged in study, teaching and research in the humanities and social sciences, including linguistics, philosophy, sociology and psychology.
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  39. Florian Demont (2012). Chomsky's Methodological Naturalism and the Mereological Fallacy. In Piotr Stalmaszcyzk (ed.), Philosophical and Formal Approaches to Linguistic Analysis. Ontos Verlag 113.
  40. Michael Devitt (2008). Methodology in the Philosophy of Linguistics. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):671 – 684.
  41. Michael Devitt (2003). Linguistics is Not Psychology. In Alex Barber (ed.), Epistemology of Language. Oxford University Press
  42. Michael Devitt & Kim Sterelny (1989). Linguistics: What's Wrong with "the Right View". Philosophical Perspectives 3:497-531.
  43. J. Dickins (1998). Extended Axiomatic Linguistics. Mouton De Gruyter.
    This volume presents the semiotic and linguistic theory of extended axiomatic functionalism, focusing on its application to linguistic description.
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  44. B. Elan Dresher (2005). 5 Chomsky and Halle's Revolution in Phonology. In James A. McGilvray (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky. Cambridge University Press 102.
  45. Jeffrey L. Elman (1995). Language as a Dynamical System. In Tim van Gelder & Robert Port (eds.), Mind as Motion: Explorations in the Dynamics of Cognition. MIT Press 195--223.
  46. Samuel D. Epstein (2007). Physiological Linguistics, and Some Implications Regarding Disciplinary Autonomy and Unification. Mind and Language 22 (1):44–67.
    Chomsky's current Biolinguistic methodology is shown to comport with what might be called 'established' aspects of biological method, thereby raising, in the biolinguistic domain, issues concerning biological autonomy from the physical sciences. At least current irreducibility of biology, including biolinguistics, stems in at least some cases from the very nature of what I will claim is physiological, or inter-organ/inter-component, macro-levels of explanation which play a new and central explanatory role in Chomsky's inter-componential explanation of certain properties of the syntactic component (...)
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  47. Małgorzata Fabiszak (ed.) (2007). Language and Meaning: Cognitive and Functional Perspectives. P. Lang.
  48. John Andrew Fisher (1971). On Being Guided by a Rule: Some Reflections on a Conceptual Problem in Chomsky's Theory of Syntax. Dissertation, University of Minnesota
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  49. G. Fitzgerald, Is Linguistics a Part of Psychology?
    Noam Chomsky, the founding father of generative grammar and the instigator of some of its core research programs, claims that linguistics is a part of psychology, concerned with a class of cognitive structures employed in speaking and understanding. In a recent book, Ignorance of Language, Michael Devitt has challenged certain core aspects of linguistics, as prominent practitioners of the science conceive of it. Among Devitt’s major conclusions is that linguistics is not a part of psychology. In this thesis I defend (...)
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  50. L. Fontainedevisscher (1988). Linguistics and the Human-Sciences-Redefining Linguistics with Hagege, Claude. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 86 (71):378-392.
1 — 50 / 138