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Profile: Alison Stone (Lancaster University)
  1. Abraham D. Stone, On Scientific Method, Induction, Statistics, and Skepticism.
    My aim in this paper is to explain how universal statements, as they occur in scientific theories, are actually tested by observational evidence, and to draw certain conclusions, on that basis, about the way in which scientific theories are tested in general. 1 But I am pursuing that aim, ambitious enough in and of itself, in the service of even more ambitious projects, and in the first place: (a) to say what is distinctive about modern science, and especially modern physical (...)
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  2. Abraham Stone, Simplicius and Avicenna on the Nature of Body.
    Ibn S¯ına, known to the Latin West as Avicenna, was a medieval Aristotelian— one of the greatest of all medieval Aristotelians. He lived in Persia from 980 to 1037, and wrote mostly in Arabic. Simplicius of Cilicia was a sixth century Neoplatonist; he is known mostly for his commentaries on Aristotle. Both of these men were, broadly speaking, part of the same philosophical tradition: the tradition of Neoplatonic or Neoplatonizing Aristotelianism. There is probably no direct historical connection between them, however, (...)
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  3. Abraham D. Stone, Husserl, Heidegger and Carnap on Fixing the Sense of Philosophical Terminology.
    The train of thought I will follow here begins with two facts about Husserl. First, the main and most intractable problems in interpreting him, and the major conflicts between his interpreters, arise from and are fed by the equivocality and unsteady meaning of his terminology. Second, Husserl has a highly developed theory of terminology, beginning with, but by no means limited to, the earliest periods of his thought. This theory of terminology, moreover, focuses on the causes of equivocality and unsteadiness (...)
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  4. Abraham D. Stone, On Scientific Method As a Method for Testing the Legitimacy of Concepts.
    Traditional attempts to delineate the distinctive rationality of modern science have taken it for granted that the purpose of empirical research is to test judgments. The choice of concepts to use in those judgments is therefore seen either a matter of indifference (Popper) or as important choice which must be made, so to speak, in advance of all empirical research (Carnap). I argue that scientific method aims precisely at empirical testing of concepts, and that even the simplest scientific ex- periment (...)
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  5. A. Stone (forthcoming). Jeffrey A. Gauthier, Hegel and Feminist Social Criticism. Radical Philosophy.
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  6. A. M. Stone (forthcoming). Asconius and the Editors:(A Corrupt Passage in Asconius' Commentary on" In Toga Candida"). Hermes.
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  7. Alison Stone (forthcoming). Hegel on Women, Law, and Contract. In Maria Drakopoulou (ed.), Feminist Encounters with Legal Philosophy.
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  8. Alison Stone (forthcoming). Hegel's Philosophy of Right: Essays on Ethics, Politics and Law.
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  9. Alison Stone (2014). Alienation From Nature and Early German Romanticism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (1):41-54.
    In this article I ask how fruitful the concept of alienation can be for thinking critically about the nature and causes of the contemporary environmental crisis. The concept of alienation enables us to claim that modern human beings have become alienated or estranged from nature and need to become reconciled with it. Yet reconciliation has often been understood—notably by Hegel and Marx—as the state of being ‘at-home-with-oneself-in-the-world’, in the name of which we are entitled, perhaps even obliged, to overcome anything (...)
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  10. Alison Stone, Hegel on Law, Women, and Contract.
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  11. Alison Stone (2012). Against Matricide: Rethinking Subjectivity and the Maternal Body. Hypatia 27 (1):118-138.
    In this article I critically re-examine Julia Kristeva's view that becoming a speaking subject requires psychical matricide: violent separation from the maternal body. I propose an alternative, non-matricidal conception of subjectivity, in part by drawing out anti-matricidal strands in Kristeva's own thought, including her view that early mother–child relations are triangular. Whereas she understands this triangle in terms of a first imaginary father, I re-interpret this triangle using Donald Winnicott's idea of potential space and Jessica Benjamin's idea of an intersubjective (...)
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  12. Alison Stone, Gender, the Family, and the Organic State in Hegel's Political Thought.
  13. Alison Stone, Holderlin and Human-Nature Relations.
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  14. Alison Stone, Psychoanalytic Feminism and the Dynamics of Mothering a Daughter.
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  15. Alison Stone (2011). Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Maternal Subjectivity. Routledge.
    In this book, Alison Stone develops a feminist approach to maternal subjectivity. Stone argues that in the West the self has often been understood in opposition to the maternal body, so that one must separate oneself from the mother and maternal care-givers on whom one depended in childhood to become a self or, in modernity, an autonomous subject. These assumptions make it difficult to be a mother and a subject, an autonomous creator of meaning. Insofar as mothers nonetheless strive to (...)
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  16. Alison Stone, Mothering a Daughter.
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  17. Alison Stone (2011). Mother-Daughter Relations and the Maternal in Irigaray and Chodorow. Philosophia 1 (1):45-64.
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  18. Alison Stone, Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century.
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  19. Alison Stone, The Edinburgh Critical History of Nineteenth-Century Philosophy.
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  20. Alison Stone (2011). The Romantic Absolute. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):497-517.
    In this article I argue that the Early German Romantics understand the absolute, or being, to be an infinite whole encompassing all the things of the world and all their causal relations. The Romantics argue that we strive endlessly to know this whole but only acquire an expanding, increasingly systematic body of knowledge about finite things, a system of knowledge which can never be completed. We strive to know the whole, the Romantics claim, because we have an original feeling of (...)
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  21. Abraham Stone (2010). On the Sources and Implications of Carnap's Der Raum. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):65-74.
    Der Raum marks a transitional stage in Carnap’s thought, and therefore has both negative and positive implications for his further development. On the one hand, he is here largely a follower of Husserl, and a correct understanding of that background is important if one wants to understand what it is that he later rejects as “metaphysics.” On the other hand, he has already broken with Husserl in certain ways, in part following other authors. His use of Hans Driesch’s Ordnungslehre, in (...)
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  22. Abraham Stone (2010). On the Teaching of Virtue in Plato's Meno and the Nature of Philosophical Authority. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10 (1):251-282.
    Socrates and Meno reach two different conclusions: in the first part of the dialogue, that virtue is knowledge and can therefore be taught; in the second, that it is reliable true opinion and can therefore be acquired only by divine inspiration. Taking into account Socrates’ role as a teacher (of his interlocutors and of Plato) and Plato’s role as a teacher (of us), I show that neither of these conclusions is consistent with the existence of philosophy as a human institution, (...)
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  23. Alison Stone (2010). Songsuk Susan Hahn, Contradiction in Motion: Hegel's Organic Concept of Life and Value. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):320-324.
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  24. Alison Stone (2010). Matter and Form: Hegel, Organicism, and the Difference Between Women and Men. In Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (eds.), Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought: Beyond Antigone? Palgrave Macmillan.
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  25. Alison Stone (2010). Natality and Mortality: Rethinking Death with Cavarero. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):353-372.
    In this article I rethink death and mortality on the basis of birth and natality, drawing on the work of the Italian feminist philosopher Adriana Cavarero. She understands birth to be the corporeal event whereby a unique person emerges from the mother’s body into the common world. On this basis Cavarero reconceives death as consisting in bodily dissolution and re-integration into cosmic life. This impersonal conception of death coheres badly with her view that birth is never exclusively material but always (...)
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  26. Alison Stone, N. Bauer, Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (2010). Hegel and Feminist Politics : A Symposium. In Kimberly Hutchings & Tuija Pulkkinen (eds.), Hegel's Philosophy and Feminist Thought. Palgrave Macmillan.
  27. A. G. Rud Jim Garrison Lynda Stone (2009). Introduction. Education and Culture 25 (2):pp. 1-11.
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  28. Adrienne Stone (2009). Tom Campbell's Proposal for a Democratic Bill of Rights. Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 34.
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  29. Alison Stone, French Feminism : The Maternal Against Disciplinary Power.
  30. Alison Stone, Intelligibility, Materiality, Politics:Recent Work on Judith Butler.
  31. Alison Stone (2009). Lisa Baraitser, Maternal Encounters: The Ethics of Interruption. Radical Philosophy 156:51.
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  32. Alison Stone (2009). On Alienation From Life. The Owl of Minerva 40 (1):69-75.
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  33. Alison Stone (2009). Review of Luce Irigaray, Conversations. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (7).
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  34. Abraham D. Stone (2008). Avicenna's Theory of Primary Mixture. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 18 (1):99-119.
    Ancient Peripatetics and Neoplatonists had great difficulty coming up with a consistent, interpretatively reasonable, and empirically adequate Aristotelian theory of complete mixture or complexion. I explain some of the main problems, with special attention to authors with whom Avicenna was familiar. I then show how Avicenna used a new doctrine of the occultness of substantial form (whose roots are found in Alfarabi) to address these problems. The result was in some respects an improvement, but it also gave rise to a (...)
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  35. Adrienne Stone (2008). Judicial Review Without Rights: Some Problems for the Democratic Legitimacy of Structural Judicial Review. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (1):1-32.
    This article addresses an issue overlooked in most of the literature on judicial review: the legitimacy of judicial review of a constitution's federal and structural provisions. Debates about the legitimacy of judicial review—at least as conducted throughout the Commonwealth—are usually focussed on rights. These debates appear to assume that the power of courts like the Australian High Court and the Canadian Supreme Court to interpret and enforce federal and structural provisions is unproblematic. This article tests that assumption and concludes that (...)
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  36. Alison Stone, Adorno and Logic.
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  37. Alison Stone (2008). Being, Knowledge, and Nature in Novalis. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):141-163.
    : This paper reconstructs the evolution of Novalis’ thought concerning being, nature, and knowledge. In his earlier writings (above all the Fichte-Studies) he argues that unitary being underlies finite phenomena and that we can never know, but only strive towards knowledge of, being. In contrast, his later writings, principally the Allgemeine Brouillon, maintain that the unitary reality underlying finite things can be known, because it is an organic whole which develops and organises itself according to an intelligible pattern. Novalis equates (...)
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  38. Alison Stone, Nineteenth Century Philosophy.
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  39. Alison Stone, Unthought Nature : Reply to Penelope Deutscher and Mary Beth Mader.
    In response to Mader's and Deutscher's questions, the author defends her approach to reading Irigaray and Butler, which entails extending the ideas of these thinkers into areas of thought with which they do not engage directly themselves. This involves relating Irigaray's ideas to the tradition of the philosophy of nature and interpreting Butler as offering, in spite of her focus on the genealogy of claims about sex, also a theory of sex itself, a theory of sex as an effect entirely (...)
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  40. Anna Stone (2008). Categorical Priming of Famous Person Recognition: A Hitherto Overlooked Methodological Factor Can Resolve a Long-Standing Debate. Cognition 108 (3):874-880.
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  41. A. Stone (2007). Feminist Interpretations of Theodor Adorno. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):322-324.
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  42. A. Stone & T. ValenTine (2007). The Categorical Structure of Knowledge for Famous People (and a Novel Application of Centre-Surround Theory)☆. Cognition 104 (3):535-564.
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  43. Alison Stone (2007). An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy. Polity.
    This is the first book to offer a systematic account of feminist philosophy as a distinctive field of philosophy. The book introduces key issues and debates in feminist philosophy including: the nature of sex, gender, and the body; the relation between gender, sexuality, and sexual difference; whether there is anything that all women have in common; and the nature of birth and its centrality to human existence. An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy shows how feminist thinking on these and related topics (...)
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  44. Alison Stone (2007). The Incomplete Materialism of French Materialist Feminism. Radical Philosophy 145.
  45. Andrew Stone (2007). Eustathios of Thessaloniki and St Nikephoros of Antioch: Hagiography for a Political End. Byzantion 77:416-431.
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  46. Anna Stone & Tim Valentine (2007). Angry and Happy Faces Perceived Without Awareness: A Comparison with the Affective Impact of Masked Famous Faces. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology 19 (2):161-186.
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  47. Alan A. Stone (2006). Law, Science, and Psychiatric Malpractice. In Stephen A. Green & Sidney Bloch (eds.), An Anthology of Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford University Press. 226.
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  48. Alison Stone (2006). Adorno and the Disenchantment of Nature. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (2):231-253.
    In this article I re-examine Adorno's and Horkheimer's account of the disenchantment of nature in Dialectic of Enlightenment . I argue that they identify disenchantment as a historical process whereby we have come to find natural things meaningless and completely intelligible. However, Adorno and Horkheimer believe that modernity not only rests on disenchantment but also tends to re-enchant nature, because it encourages us to think that its institutions derive from, and are anticipated and prefigured by, nature. I argue that Adorno's (...)
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  49. Alison Stone (2006). Luce Irigaray and the Philosophy of Sexual Difference. Cambridge University Press.
    Alison Stone offers a feminist defence of the idea that sexual difference is natural, providing a new interpretation of the later philosophy of Luce Irigaray. She defends Irigaray's unique form of essentialism and her rethinking of the relationship between nature and culture, showing how Irigaray's ideas can be reconciled with Judith Butler's performative conception of gender, through rethinking sexual difference in relation to German Romantic philosophies of nature. This is the first sustained attempt to connect feminist conceptions of embodiment to (...)
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  50. Alison Stone (2006). Sexing the State: Familial and Political Form in Irigaray and Hegel. Radical Philosophy 113:24-36.
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