Search results for 'Knowledge, Theory of History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lydia Schumacher (2011). Divine Illumination: The History and Future of Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 1446.0
    Takes an original approach to reading Augustine's theory of divine illumination and shows how the theory was transformed and reinterpreted in medieval ...
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  2. Steven P. Marrone (2012). Divine Illumination: The History and Future of Augustine's Theory of Knowledge (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):293-294.score: 1038.0
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  3. Norman Gulley (1962/1986). Plato's Theory of Knowledge. Greenwood Press.score: 1032.0
    CHAPTER I The Theory of Recollection I. SOCRATIC DOCTRINE IN THE EARLY DIALOGUES In Plato's early dialogues one of the most characteristic and at the same ...
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  4. John R. Shook (2000). Dewey's Empirical Theory of Knowledge and Reality. Vanderbilt University Press.score: 990.0
    While previous studies of Dewey's work have taken either a historical or topical focus, Shook offers an innovative, organic approach to understanding Dewey and eloquently shows that Dewey's instrumentalism grew seamlessly out of his idealism. He argues that most current scholarship operates under a mistaken impression of Dewey's early philosophical positions.
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  5. Dudley Shapere (1977). What Can the Theory of Knowledge Learn From the History of Knowledge? The Monist 60 (4):488-508.score: 990.0
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  6. Frederick Van Fleteren (2011). Lydia Schumacher. Divine Illumination: The History and Future of Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. Augustinian Studies 42 (2):307-310.score: 990.0
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  7. Ian Clausen (2011). Lydia Schumacher. Divine Illumination: The History and Future of Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. Augustinian Studies 42 (2):302-306.score: 990.0
  8. Antonio Calcagno (2013). Lydia Schumacher, Divine Illumination: The History and Future of Augustine's Theory of Knowledge.(Challenges in Contemporary Theology.) Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011. Pp. Xiii, 250. $119.95. ISBN: 9780470657423. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (2):579-581.score: 990.0
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  9. Laura Holt (2014). Divine Illumination: The History and Future of Augustine's Theory of Knowledge (Challenges in Contemporary Theology). By Lydia Schumacher. Pp. 239, Chichester, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2011, £75.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 55 (1):139-140.score: 990.0
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  10. Francisco Conde (2013). Three Periods in Husserl's Study of Teleology: Evidence and Systematicity in the Theory of Knowledge, Ethical Renewal and Reason in History. Pensamiento 69 (259):233-256.score: 990.0
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  11. Kevin L. Hughes (2013). Divine Illumination: The History and Future of Augustine's Theory of Knowledge by Lydia Schumacher (Oxford: Wiley‐Blackwell, 2011) Xiii + 250 Pp. [REVIEW] Modern Theology 29 (1):176-178.score: 990.0
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  12. M. Veto (1998). The Ruse of Reason: Theory of Knowledge and the Philosophy of History. Hegel-Studien 33:177-190.score: 990.0
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  13. Christopher B. Kulp (1992). The End of Epistemology: Dewey and His Current Allies on the Spectator Theory of Knowledge. Greenwood Press.score: 978.0
  14. David Castillejo (1967/1968). A Theory of Shifting Relationships in Knowledge as Seen in Medieval and Modern Times. [London.score: 978.0
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  15. Constantine Cavarnos (1988). A Dialogue Between Bergson, Aristotle, and Philologos: A Comparative and Critical Study of Some Aspects of Henri Bergson's Theory of Knowledge and of Reality. Institute for Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies.score: 978.0
     
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  16. Marie-Luise Schubert Kalsi (1987). Meinong's Theory of Knowledge. M. Nijhoff.score: 978.0
  17. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.score: 864.0
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, (...)
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  18. Shadi Bartsch (2006). The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire. University of Chicago Press.score: 840.0
    People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone—or oneself—was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an erotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self , Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social history, Bartsch traces (...)
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  19. Pietro Gori (2009). “Sounding Out Idols”: Knowledge, History and Metaphysics in Human, All Too Human and Twilight of the Idols. In Volker Gerhard & Renate Reschke (eds.), Nietzscheforschung, vol. 16.score: 834.0
    Twilight of the Idols has a main role in Nietzsche’s work, since it represents the opening writing of his project of Transvaluation of all values. The task of this essay is sounding out idols, i.e. to disclose their lack of content, their being hollow. The theme of eternal idols is in this work strictly related to the idea of a ‘true’ world and, consequently, a study on this latter notion can contribute to a better comprehension of what does that emptiness (...)
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  20. Paul Richard Blum (2010). Michael Polanyi: The Anthropology of Intellectual History. Studies in East European Thought 62 (2):197 - 216.score: 834.0
    Scientific and political developments of the early twentieth century led Michael Polanyi to study the role of the scientist in research and the interaction between the individual scholar and the surrounding conditions in community and society. In his concept of “personal knowledge” he gave the theory and history of science an anthropological turn. In many instances of the history of sciences, research is driven by a commitment to beliefs and values. Society plays the role of authority and (...)
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  21. David Bloor (1983). Wittgenstein: A Social Theory of Knowledge. Columbia University Press.score: 804.0
  22. K. P. (2003). Theory-Ladenness of Evidence: A Case Study From History of Chemistry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (2):351-368.score: 780.0
    This paper attempts to argue for the theory-ladenness of evidence. It does so by employing and analysing an episode from the history of eighteenth century chemistry. It delineates attempts by Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier to construct entirely different kinds of evidence for and against a particular hypothesis from a set of agreed upon observations or (raw) data. Based on an augmented version of a distinction, drawn by J. Bogen and J. Woodward, between data and phenomena it is (...)
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  23. Luciano Floridi (1993). The Problem of the Justification of a Theory of Knowledge. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 24 (2):205 - 233.score: 780.0
    The article concerns the meta-epistemological problem of the justification of a theory of knowledge and provides a reconstruction of the history of its formulations. In the first section, I analyse the connections between Sextus Empiricus' diallelus, Montaigne's rouet and Chisholm's "problem of criterion"; in the second section I focus on the link between the diallelus and the Cartesian circle; in the third section I reconstruct the origin of "Fries' trilemma"; finally, in the last section I draw some general (...)
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  24. Stephen G. Brush (2002). How Theories Became Knowledge: Morgan's Chromosome Theory of Heredity in America and Britain. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):471 - 535.score: 780.0
    T. H. Morgan, A. H. Sturtevant, H. J. Muller and C. B. Bridges published their comprehensive treatise "The Mechanism of Mendelian Heredity" in 1915. By 1920 Morgan's "Chromosome Theory of Heredity" was generally accepted by geneticists in the United States, and by British geneticists by 1925. By 1930 it had been incorporated into most general biology, botany, and zoology textbooks as established knowledge. In this paper, I examine the reasons why it was accepted as part of a (...)
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  25. Toni Weller (2006). A Continuation of Paul Grobstein's Theory of Science as Story Telling and Story Revising: A Discussion of its Relevance to History. Journal of Research Practice 2 (1):Article M3.score: 780.0
    This paper applies Paul Grobstein's theory of science as story telling and story revising to history. The purpose of drawing such links is to show that in our current age when disciplinary borders are becoming increasingly blurred, what may be effective research practice for one discipline, may have some useful insights for another. It argues that what Grobstein advocates for science makes just as much sense for history and that historians have long recognised in their own discipline (...)
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  26. Bimal Krishna Matilal (1986). Perception: An Essay on Classical Indian Theories of Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 770.0
    This book is a defence of a form of realism which stands closest to that upheld by the Nyãya-Vaid'sesika school in classical India. The author presents the Nyãya view and critically examines it against that of its traditional opponent, the Buddhist version of phenomenalism and idealism. His reconstruction of Nyãya arguments meets not only traditional Buddhist objections but also those of modern sense-data representationalists.
     
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  27. Peter Becker & William Clark (eds.) (2001). Little Tools of Knowledge: Historical Essays on Academic and Bureaucratic Practices. University of Michigan Press.score: 756.0
    This volume brings historians of science and social historians together to consider the role of "little tools"--such as tables, reports, questionnaires, dossiers, index cards--in establishing academic and bureaucratic claims to authority and objectivity. From at least the eighteenth century onward, our science and society have been planned, surveyed, examined, and judged according to particular techniques of collecting and storing knowledge. Recently, the seemingly self-evident nature of these mundane epistemic and administrative tools, as well as the prose in which they are (...)
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  28. Robert Pasnau (1997). Theories of Cognition in the Later Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press.score: 730.0
    This book is a major contribution to the history of philosophy in the later medieval period (1250-1350). It focuses on cognitive theory, a subject of intense investigation during these years. In fact many of the issues that dominate philosophy of mind and epistemology today - intentionality, mental representation, scepticism, realism - were hotly debated in the later medieval period. The book offers a careful analysis of these debates, primarily through the work of Thomas Aquinas, John Olivi, and William (...)
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  29. Hugh H. Benson (2000). Socratic Wisdom: The Model of Knowledge in Plato's Early Dialogues. Oxford University Press.score: 696.0
    While the early Platonic dialogues have often been explored and appreciated for their ethical content, this is the first book devoted solely to the epistemology of Plato's early dialogues. Author Hugh H. Benson argues that the characteristic features of these dialogues--Socrates' method of questions and answers (elenchos), his fascination with definition, his professions of ignorance, and his thesis that virtue is knowledge--are decidedly epistemological. In this thoughtful study, Benson (...)
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  30. Henri Oosthout (1991). Modes of Knowledge and the Transcendental: An Introduction to Plotinus Ennead 5.3 (49) with a Commentary and Translation. [REVIEW] B.R. Grüner.score: 696.0
    I INTRODUCTION INTERPRETING PLOT1NUS Methods of Interpretation,; Plotinus and the History of Greek Philosophy, 8; Preliminary Remarks, ...
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  31. H. A. E. Zwart (forthcoming). From Playfulness and Self-Centredness Via Grand Expectations to Normalisation: A Psychoanalytical Rereading of the History of Molecular Genetics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-14.score: 694.0
    In this paper, I will reread the history of molecular genetics from a psychoanalytical angle, analysing it as a case history. Building on the developmental theories of Freud and his followers, I will distinguish four stages, namely: (1) oedipal childhood, notably the epoch of model building (1943–1953); (2) the latency period, with a focus on the development of basic skills (1953–1989); (3) adolescence, exemplified by the Human Genome Project, with its fierce conflicts, great expectations and grandiose claims (1989–2003) (...)
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  32. Mohammadreza Zolfagharian, Reza Akbari & Hamidreza Fartookzadeh (2014). Theory of Knowledge in System Dynamics Models. Foundations of Science 19 (2):189-207.score: 693.0
    Having entered into the problem structuring methods, system dynamics (SD) is an approach, among systems’ methodologies, which claims to recognize the main structures of socio-economic behaviors. However, the concern for building or discovering strong philosophical underpinnings of SD, undoubtedly playing an important role in the modeling process, is a long-standing issue, in a way that there is a considerable debate about the assumptions or the philosophical foundations of it. In this paper, with a new perspective, we have explored theory (...)
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  33. Hisham Ghassib (2012). A Theory of the Knowledge Industry. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 26 (4):447-456.score: 690.0
    This article deals with the social production of knowledge in the exact sciences. After defining the term ?exact science?, it delineates the broad dynamic of its history. It, then, offers a socio-economic historical explanation of why the production of knowledge has become a major industry, if not the largest industry, in the last hundred years. The article concludes by drawing a detailed blueprint of the components, mechanisms, and specificities of the knowledge industry.
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  34. Jens Høyrup (1995). As Regards the Humanities--: An Approach to Their Theory Through History and Philosophy. Max Planck Institute for the History of Science.score: 690.0
    pt. I. Institutions, professions and ideas -- pt. II. Human science and human nature -- pt. III. The art of knowing.
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  35. Keith Lehrer (2000). Theory of Knowledge. Westview Press.score: 688.5
    In this impressive second edition of Theory of Knowledge, Keith Lehrer introduces students to the major traditional and contemporary accounts of knowing. Beginning with the traditional definition of knowledge as justified true belief, Lehrer explores the truth, belief, and justification conditions on the way to a thorough examination of foundation theories of knowledge,the work of Platinga, externalism and naturalized epistemologies, internalism and modern coherence theories, contextualism, and recent reliabilist and causal theories. Lehrer gives all views careful examination and (...)
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  36. Noah Marcelino Lemos (2007). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.score: 688.5
    Epistemology or the theory of knowledge is one of the cornerstones of analytic philosophy, and this book provides a clear and accessible introduction to the subject. It discusses some of the main theories of justification, including foundationalism, coherentism, reliabilism, and virtue epistemology. Other topics include the Gettier problem, internalism and externalism, skepticism, the problem of epistemic circularity, the problem of the criterion, a priori knowledge, and naturalized epistemology. Intended primarily for students taking a first class in epistemology, this lucid (...)
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  37. Bertrand Russell (1992/1988). Theory of Knowledge: The 1913 Manuscript. Routledge.score: 688.5
    First published in 1984 as part of The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell , Theory of Knowledge represents an important addition to our knowledge of Russell's thought. In this work Russell attempts to flesh out the sketch implicit in The Problems of Philosophy . It was conceived by Russell as his next major project after Principia Mathematica and was intended to provide the epistemological foundations for his work. Russell's subsequent difficulties in presenting his theory of knowledge, brought on (...)
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  38. Dan O'Brien (2006). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Polity Press.score: 688.5
    An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge guides the reader through the key issues and debates in contemporary epistemology. Lucid, comprehensive and accessible, it is an ideal textbook for students who are new to the subject and for university undergraduates. The book is divided into five parts. Part I discusses the concept of knowledge and distinguishes between different types of knowledge. Part II surveys the sources of knowledge, considering both a priori and a posteriori knowledge. Parts III and IV (...)
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  39. Alan Musgrave (1993). Common Sense, Science, and Scepticism: A Historical Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.score: 688.5
    Can we know anything for certain? There are those who think we can (traditionally labeled the "dogmatists") and those who think we cannot (traditionally labeled the "skeptics"). The theory of knowledge, or epistemology, is the great debate between the two. This book is an introductory and historically-based survey of the debate. It sides for the most part with the skeptics. It also develops out of skepticism a third view, fallibilism or critical rationalism, which incorporates an uncompromising realism about perception, (...)
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  40. Justus Hartnack (1968). Kant's Theory of Knowledge. Melbourne [Etc.]Macmillan.score: 688.5
    The significance of Kant's philosophy is to be found primarily in his theory of knowledge, a theory that is set forth in his voluminous work, The Critique ...
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  41. Thomas J. Blakeley (1964). Soviet Theory of Knowledge. Dordrecht, Holland, D. Reidel Pub. Co..score: 688.5
    THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOVIET THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE AND ITS MAIN REPRESENTATIVES By definition the philosophical treatment of knowledge is an integral part of the ...
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  42. Paul K. Moser (ed.) (1998). The Theory of Knowledge: A Thematic Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 688.5
    This book is an accessible introduction to contemporary epistemology, the theory of knowledge. It introduces traditional topics in epistemology within the context of contemporary debates about the definition, sources, and limits of human knowledge. Rich in examples and written in an engaging style, it explains the field while avoiding technical detail. It relates epistemology to work in cognitive science and defends a plausible version of explanationism regarding epistemological method.
     
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  43. Karl R. Popper (2009/2012). The Two Fundamental Problems of the Theory of Knowledge. Routledge.score: 688.5
    A brief historical comment on scientific knowledge as Socratic ignorance -- Some critical comments on the text of this book, particularly on the theory of truth Exposition [1933] -- Problem of Induction (Experience and Hypothesis) -- Two Fundamental Problems of the Theory of Knowledge -- Formulation of the Problem -- The problem of induction and the problem of demarcation -- Deductivtsm and Inductivism -- Comments on how the solutions are reached and preliminary presentation of the solutions -- Rationalism (...)
     
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  44. Peter Carruthers (2011). The Opacity of Mind: An Integrative Theory of Self-Knowledge. OUP Oxford.score: 688.5
    It is widely believed that people have privileged and authoritative access to their own thoughts, and many theories have been proposed to explain this supposed fact. The Opacity of Mind challenges the consensus view and subjects the theories in question to critical scrutiny, while showing that they are not protected against the findings of cognitive science by belonging to a separate 'explanatory space'. The book argues that our access to our own thoughts is almost always interpretive, grounded in perceptual awareness (...)
     
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  45. Eileen Dombrowski (2007). Theory of Knowledge: Course Companion. Oxford University Press.score: 688.5
    Developed in collaboration with the International Baccalaureate Organization, Oxford's Course Companions provide extra support for students taking IB Diploma Programme courses. They present a whole-course approach with a wide range of resources, and encourage a deep understanding of each subject by making connections to wider issues and providing opportunites for critical thinking. This companion stimulates students to think about learning and knowledge from their own and from others' perspectives in a way that crosses disciplines and cultures. It encourages reflection, discussion, (...)
     
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  46. Elizabeth Ramsden Eames (1969). Bertrand Russell's Theory of Knowledge. London, Allen & Unwin.score: 688.5
    When future generations come to analyze and survey twentieth-century philosophy as a whole, Bertrand Russell’s logic and theory of knowledge is assured a place of prime importance. Yet until this book was first published in 1969 no comprehensive treatment of his epistemology had appeared. Commentators on twentieth-century philosophy at the time assumed that Russell’s important contributions to the theory of knowledge were made before 1921. This book challenges that assumption and draws attention to features of Russell’s later work (...)
     
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  47. Richard van de Lagemaat (2005). Theory of Knowledge for the Ib Diploma. Cambridge University Press.score: 688.5
    This comprehensive and accessible book is designed for use by students following the Theory of Knowledge course in the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme. The book is also useful for students following other critical thinking courses. The fundamental question in Theory of Knowledge is 'How do you know? In exploring this question, the author encourages critical thinking across a range of subject areas and helps students to ask relevant questions, use language with care and precision, support ideas with (...)
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  48. Christoph Jäger (2004). Skepticism, Information, and Closure: Dretske's Theory of Knowledge. Erkenntnis 61 (2-3):187 - 201.score: 684.0
    According to Fred Dretskes externalist theory of knowledge a subject knows that p if and only if she believes that p and this belief is caused or causally sustained by the information that p. Another famous feature of Dretskes epistemology is his denial that knowledge is closed under known logical entailment. I argue that, given Dretskes construal of information, he is in fact committed to the view that both information and knowledge are closed under known entailment. This has far-reaching (...)
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  49. Richard W. Paul (1989). Critical Thinking in North America: A New Theory of Knowledge, Learning, and Literacy. [REVIEW] Argumentation 3 (2):197-235.score: 684.0
    The pace of change in the world is accelerating, yet educational institutions have not kept pace. Indeed, schools have historically been the most static of social institutions, uncritically passing down from generation to generation outmoded didactic, lecture-and-drill-based, models of instruction. Predictable results follow. Students, on the whole, do not learn how to work by, or think for, themselves. They do not learn how to gather, analyze, synthesize and assess information. They do not learn how to analyze the diverse logic of (...)
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  50. Ben Bronner (2012). Problems with the Dispositional Tracking Theory of Knowledge. Logos and Episteme 3 (3):505-507.score: 675.0
    Rachael Briggs and Daniel Nolan attempt to improve on Nozick’s tracking theory of knowledge by providing a modified, dispositional tracking theory. The dispositional theory, however, faces more problems than those previously noted by John Turri. First, it is not simply that satisfaction of the theory’s conditions is unnecessary for knowledge – it is insufficient as well. Second, in one important respect, the dispositional theory is a step backwards relative to the original tracking theory: the (...)
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