Search results for 'Material Logic' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John of St Thomas (1955). The Material Logic of John of St. Thomas: Basic Treatises. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.score: 162.0
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  2. R. W. Schmidt (1956). The Material Logic of John of St. Thomas. New Scholasticism 30 (2):232-234.score: 150.0
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  3. J. Venn (1879). The Difficulties of Material Logic. Mind 4 (13):35-47.score: 150.0
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  4. R. C. Perry (1971). Assertion and Postulation in the "Material Logic". Mind 80 (320):589-592.score: 150.0
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  5. R. W. Schmidt (2008). The Material Logic of John of St. Thomas. New Scholasticism 30 (2):232-234.score: 150.0
  6. John J. Fitzgerald (1957). The Material Logic of John of St. Thomas. Modern Schoolman 34 (4):304-306.score: 150.0
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  7. Walter Schroyens (2010). Logic and/in Psychology: The Paradoxes of Material Implication and Psychologism in the Cognitive Science of Human Reasoning. In Mike Oaksford & Nick Chater (eds.), Cognition and Conditionals: Probability and Logic in Human Thinking. Oup Oxford.score: 126.0
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  8. Martin M. Tweedale (1971). Review: E. J. Ashworth, Propositional Logic in the Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Centuries; E. J. Ashworth, Petrus Fonseca and Material Implication. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (2):323-324.score: 126.0
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  9. Peter Louis Galison (1999). Reflections on Image and Logic: A Material Culture of Microphysics. Perspectives on Science 7 (2):255-284.score: 120.0
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  10. Olivier Darrigol (2001). Revue Critique. Sur l'Ouvrage de Peter Galison, Image and Logic: A Material Culture of Microphysics/Critical Review. Image and Logic: A Material Culture of Microphysics by Peter Galison. [REVIEW] Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 54 (2):255-260.score: 120.0
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  11. Kent Staley (2000). Book Review:Image and Logic: A Material Culture of Microphysics Peter Galison. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 67 (2):339-.score: 120.0
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  12. Charls Pearson (2009). A Translation Between Combinatory Logic and the Alethic Material Propositional Logic. Semiotics:367-372.score: 120.0
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  13. Luciana Repici (2009). Theophrastus' Logic (P.) Huby Theophrastus of Eresus. Sources for His Life, Writings, Thought and Influence. Commentary Volume 2: Logic. With Contributions on the Arabic Material by Dimitri Gutas. (Philosophia Antiqua 103.) Pp. Xvi + 208. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2007. Cased, €89, US$120. ISBN: 978-90-04-15298-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):74-.score: 120.0
  14. Olivier Darrigol (2001). Documents-Critical Review. Image and Logic: A Material Culture of Microphysics by Peter Galison. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 54 (2):255-260.score: 120.0
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  15. John Ziman (1998). Image and Logic: A Material Culture of Microphysics, by Peter Galison. [REVIEW] Minerva 36 (3):289-293.score: 120.0
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  16. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter I: Material Possibility.score: 114.0
    This is the first of a series of four papers presenting modal logic as a branch of material, rather than merely formal, logic.
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  17. Liza Verhoeven (2007). The Relevance of a Relevantly Assertable Disjunction for Material Implication. Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (3):339-366.score: 108.0
    In this paper Grice's requirements for assertability are imposed on the disjunction of Classical Logic. Defining material implication in terms of negation and disjunction supplemented by assertability conditions, results in the disappearance of the most important paradoxes of material implication. The resulting consequence relation displays a very strong resemblance to Schurz's conclusion-relevant consequence relation.
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  18. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter II: Material Contingency and Sufficient Reason.score: 96.0
    This is the second of a series of papers inspired by a paper I wrote around 1989. In this paper, I consider the notion of material contingency and relate it to the traditional, metaphysically loaded Principle of Sufficient Reason.
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  19. David Sherry (2006). Formal Logic for Informal Logicians. Informal Logic 26 (2):199-220.score: 90.0
    Classical logic yields counterintuitive results for numerous propositional argument forms. The usual alternatives (modal logic, relevance logic, etc.) generate counterintuitive results of their own. The counterintuitive results create problems—especially pedagogical problems—for informal logicians who wish to use formal logic to analyze ordinary argumentation. This paper presents a system, PL– (propositional logic minus the funny business), based on the idea that paradigmatic valid argument forms arise from justificatory or explanatory discourse. PL– avoids the pedagogical difficulties without (...)
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  20. Niki Pfeifer (2013). Reasoning About Uncertain Conditionals. Studia Logica (4):1-18.score: 72.0
    There is a long tradition in formal epistemology and in the psychology of reasoning to investigate indicative conditionals. In psychology, the propositional calculus was taken for granted to be the normative standard of reference. Experimental tasks, evaluation of the participants’ responses and psychological model building, were inspired by the semantics of the material conditional. Recent empirical work on indicative conditionals focuses on uncertainty. Consequently, the normative standard of reference has changed. I argue why neither logic nor standard probability (...)
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  21. Ian Chiswell (2007). Mathematical Logic. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    Assuming no previous study in logic, this informal yet rigorous text covers the material of a standard undergraduate first course in mathematical logic, using natural deduction and leading up to the completeness theorem for first-order logic. At each stage of the text, the reader is given an intuition based on standard mathematical practice, which is subsequently developed with clean formal mathematics. Alongside the practical examples, readers learn what can and can't be calculated; for example the correctness (...)
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  22. Murdoch J. Gabbay (2011). Foundations of Nominal Techniques: Logic and Semantics of Variables in Abstract Syntax. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 17 (2):161-229.score: 72.0
    We are used to the idea that computers operate on numbers, yet another kind of data is equally important: the syntax of formal languages, with variables, binding, and alpha-equivalence. The original application of nominal techniques, and the one with greatest prominence in this paper, is to reasoning on formal syntax with variables and binding. Variables can be modelled in many ways: for instance as numbers (since we usually take countably many of them); as links (since they may `point' to a (...)
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  23. Robert K. Meyer (2008). Ai, Me and Lewis (Abelian Implication, Material Equivalence and C I Lewis 1920). Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (2):169 - 181.score: 72.0
    C I Lewis showed up Down Under in 2005, in e-mails initiated by Allen Hazen of Melbourne. Their topic was the system Hazen called FL (a Funny Logic), axiomatized in passing in Lewis 1921. I show that FL is the system MEN of material equivalence with negation. But negation plays no special role in MEN. Symbolizing equivalence with → and defining ∼A inferentially as A→f, the theorems of MEN are just those of the underlying theory ME of pure (...)
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  24. Lloyd Humberstone (2000). An Intriguing Logic with Two Implicational Connectives. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 41 (1):1-40.score: 72.0
    Matthew Spinks [35] introduces implicative BCSK-algebras, expanding implicative BCK-algebras with an additional binary operation. Subdirectly irreducible implicative BCSK-algebras can be viewed as flat posets with two operations coinciding only in the 1- and 2-element cases, each, in the latter case, giving the two-valued implication truth-function. We introduce the resulting logic (for the general case) in terms of matrix methodology in §1, showing how to reformulate the matrix semantics as a Kripke-style possible worlds semantics, thereby displaying the distinction between the (...)
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  25. Herbert B. Enderton (1972). A Mathematical Introduction to Logic. New York,Academic Press.score: 72.0
    A Mathematical Introduction to Logic, Second Edition, offers increased flexibility with topic coverage, allowing for choice in how to utilize the textbook in a course. The author has made this edition more accessible to better meet the needs of today's undergraduate mathematics and philosophy students. It is intended for the reader who has not studied logic previously, but who has some experience in mathematical reasoning. Material is presented on computer science issues such as computational complexity and database (...)
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  26. Alexej P. Pynko (2000). Subprevarieties Versus Extensions. Application to the Logic of Paradox. Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (2):756-766.score: 72.0
    In the present paper we prove that the poset of all extensions of the logic defined by a class of matrices whose sets of distinguished values are equationally definable by their algebra reducts is the retract, under a Galois connection, of the poset of all subprevarieties of the prevariety generated by the class of the algebra reducts of the matrices involved. We apply this general result to the problem of finding and studying all extensions of the logic of (...)
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  27. Néstor Cohen & Gabriela Gómez Rojas (2003). La Lógica Del Experimento Como Instancia Pedagógica. Cinta de Moebio 18.score: 72.0
    The present article tries to emphasize the roll of the experimental logic in the process of education-learning of the methodology of the investigation. Its treatment usually appears as material for the later boarding of the explanation or the calls explanatory designs or explanatory reconnaissanc..
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  28. Uwe Petersen (2002). Diagonal Method and Dialectical Logic: Tools, Materials, and Groundworks for a Logical Foundation of Dialectic and Speculative Philosophy. Der Andere Verlag.score: 68.0
    bk. 1. Tools for dialectic -- bk. 2. Historical-philosophical background materials -- bk. 3. Groundworks for dialectical logic.
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  29. Colin Howson (1997). Logic with Trees: An Introduction to Symbolic Logic. Routledge.score: 66.0
    Logic With Trees is a new and original introduction to modern formal logic. It contains discussions on philosophical issues such as truth, conditionals and modal logic, presenting the formal material with clarity, and preferring informal explanations and arguments to intimidatingly rigorous development. Worked examples and exercises guide beginners through the book, with answers to selected exercises enabling readers to check their progress. Logic With Trees equips students with: a complete and clear account of the truth-tree (...)
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  30. John MacFarlane (2000). What Does It Mean to Say That Logic is Formal? Dissertation, University of Pittsburghscore: 66.0
    Much philosophy of logic is shaped, explicitly or implicitly, by the thought that logic is distinctively formal and abstracts from material content. The distinction between formal and material does not appear to coincide with the more familiar contrasts between a priori and empirical, necessary and contingent, analytic and synthetic—indeed, it is often invoked to explain these. Nor, it turns out, can it be explained by appeal to schematic inference patterns, syntactic rules, or grammar. What does it (...)
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  31. María Manzano (1996). Extensions of First Order Logic. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    Classical logic has proved inadequate in various areas of computer science, artificial intelligence, mathematics, philosopy and linguistics. This is an introduction to extensions of first-order logic, based on the principle that many-sorted logic (MSL) provides a unifying framework in which to place, for example, second-order logic, type theory, modal and dynamic logics and MSL itself. The aim is two fold: only one theorem-prover is needed; proofs of the metaproperties of the different existing calculi can be avoided (...)
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  32. Stephen Cole Kleene (1967/2002). Mathematical Logic. Dover Publications.score: 66.0
    Undergraduate students with no prior classroom instruction in mathematical logic will benefit from this evenhanded multipart text by one of the centuries greatest authorities on the subject. Part I offers an elementary but thorough overview of mathematical logic of first order. The treatment does not stop with a single method of formulating logic; students receive instruction in a variety of techniques, first learning model theory (truth tables), then Hilbert-type proof theory, and proof theory handled through derived rules. (...)
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  33. John Venn (1907/1973). The Principles of Inductive Logic. New York,Chelsea Pub. Co..score: 66.0
    CHAPTER I. THE FOUNDATIONS OF LOGIC :— THE UNIVERSE AS THE MATERIAL LOGICIAN REGARDS IT. SINCE Logic, as conceived and expounded in this work, ...
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  34. Timothy Williamson (2013). Response to Cohen, Comesaña, Goodman, Nagel, and Weatherson on Gettier Cases in Epistemic Logic. Inquiry 56 (1):77-96.score: 66.0
    The five commentators on my paper ‘Gettier Cases in Epistemic Logic’ (GCEL) demonstrate how fruitful the topic can be. Especially in Brian Weatherson's contribution, and to some extent in those of Jennifer Nagel and Jeremy Goodman, much of the material constitutes valuable development and refinement of ideas in GCEL, rather than criticism. In response, I draw some threads together, and answer objections, mainly those in the papers by Stewart Cohen and Juan Comesaña and by Goodman.
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  35. Alonzo Church, C. Anthony Anderson & Michael Zelëny (eds.) (2001). Logic, Meaning, and Computation: Essays in Memory of Alonzo Church. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 66.0
    This volume began as a remembrance of Alonzo Church while he was still with us and is now finally complete. It contains papers by many well-known scholars, most of whom have been directly influenced by Church's own work. Often the emphasis is on foundational issues in logic, mathematics, computation, and philosophy - as was the case with Church's contributions, now universally recognized as having been of profound fundamental significance in those areas. The volume will be of interest to logicians, (...)
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  36. Wolfgang Rautenberg (2006). A Concise Introduction to Mathematical Logic. Springer.score: 66.0
    Traditional logic as a part of philosophy is one of the oldest scientific disciplines. Mathematical logic, however, is a relatively young discipline and arose from the endeavors of Peano, Frege, Russell and others to create a logistic foundation for mathematics. It steadily developed during the 20th century into a broad discipline with several sub-areas and numerous applications in mathematics, informatics, linguistics and philosophy. While there are already several well-known textbooks on mathematical logic, this book is unique in (...)
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  37. Sally Popkorn (1994). First Steps in Modal Logic. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    This is a first course in propositional modal logic, suitable for mathematicians, computer scientists and philosophers. Emphasis is placed on semantic aspects, in the form of labelled transition structures, rather than on proof theory. The book covers all the basic material - propositional languages, semantics and correspondence results, proof systems and completeness results - as well as some topics not usually covered in a modal logic course. It is written from a mathematical standpoint. To help the reader, (...)
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  38. John Marenbon (1981/2006). From the Circle of Alcuin to the School of Auxerre: Logic, Theology, and Philosophy in the Early Middle Ages. New Yorkcambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    This study is the first modern account of the development of philosophy during the Carolingian Renaissance. In the late eighth century, Dr Marenbon argues, theologians were led by their enthusiasm for logic to pose themselves truly philosophical questions. The central themes of ninth-century philosophy - essence, the Aristotelian Categories, the problem of Universals - were to preoccupy thinkers throughout the Middle Ages. The earliest period of medieval philosophy was thus a formative one. This work is based on a fresh (...)
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  39. Mark T. Nelson (1993). Promises and Material Conditionals. Teaching Philosophy 16 (2):155-156.score: 66.0
    Some beginning logic students find it hard to understand why a material conditional is true when its antecedent is false. I draw an analogy between conditional statements and conditional promises (especially between true conditional statements and unbroken conditional promises) that makes this point of logic less counter-intuitive.
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  40. Richard Kaye (2007). The Mathematics of Logic: A Guide to Completeness Theorems and Their Applications. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    This undergraduate textbook covers the key material for a typical first course in logic, in particular presenting a full mathematical account of the most important result in logic, the Completeness Theorem for first-order logic. Looking at a series of interesting systems, increasing in complexity, then proving and discussing the Completeness Theorem for each, the author ensures that the number of new concepts to be absorbed at each stage is manageable, whilst providing lively mathematical applications throughout. Unfamiliar (...)
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  41. Peter Kreeft (2005). Socratic Logic. St. Augustine's Press.score: 66.0
    What good is logic? -- Seventeen ways this book is different -- The two logics -- All of logic in two pages : an overview -- The three acts of the mind -- I. The first act of the mind : understanding -- Understanding : the thing that distinguishes man from both beast and computer -- Concepts, terms and words -- The problem of universals -- The comprehension and extension of terms -- II. Terms -- Classifying terms -- (...)
     
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  42. Herbert Marcuse & Phillip Deen (2010). Herbert Marcuse's “Review of John Dewey's Logic: The Theory of Inquiry”. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (2):258-265.score: 60.0
    Dewey’s book is the first systematic attempt at a pragmatistic logic (since the work of Peirce). Because of the ambiguity of the concept of pragmatism, the author rejects the concept in general. But, if one interprets pragmatism correctly, then this book is ‘through and through Pragmatistic’. What he understands as ‘correct’ will become clear in the following account. The book takes its subject matter far beyond the traditional works on logic. It is a material logic first (...)
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  43. Tomis Kapitan (1982). On the Concept of Material Consequence. History and Philosophy of Logic 3 (2):193-211.score: 60.0
    Everyday reasoning is replete with arguments which, though not logically valid, nonetheless harbor a measure of credibility in their own right. Here the claim that such arguments force us to acknowledge material validity, in addition to logical validity, is advanced, and criteria that attempt to unpack this concept are examined in detail. Of special concern is the effort to model these criteria on explications of logical validity that rely on notions of substitutivity and logical form. It is argued, however, (...)
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  44. Richard A. Shore (2010). Reverse Mathematics: The Playground of Logic. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 16 (3):378-402.score: 60.0
    This paper is essentially the author's Gödel Lecture at the ASL Logic Colloquium '09 in Sofia extended and supplemented by material from some other papers. After a brief description of traditional reverse mathematics, a computational approach to is presented. There are then discussions of some interactions between reverse mathematics and the major branches of mathematical logic in terms of the techniques they supply as well as theorems for analysis. The emphasis here is on ones that lie outside (...)
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  45. Peter Mittelstaedt (1977). Time Dependent Propositions and Quantum Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 6 (1):463 - 472.score: 60.0
    Compound propositions which can successfully be defended in a quantumdialogue independent of the elementary propositions contained in it, must have this property also independent of the mutual elementary commensur-abilities. On the other hand, formal commensurabilities must be taken into account. Therefore, for propositions which can be proved by P, irrespective of both the elementary propositions and of the elementary commensur-abilities, there exists a formal strategy of success. The totality of propositions with a formal strategy of success in a quantum dialogue (...)
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  46. Ken Akiba (1996). Logic as Instrument: The Millian View on the Role of Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 17 (1-2):73-83.score: 60.0
    I interpret Mill?s view on logic as the instrumentalist view that logical inferences, complex statements, and logical operators are not necessary for reasoning itself, but are useful only for our remembering and communicating the results of the reasoning. To defend this view, I first show that we can transform all the complex statements in the language of classical first-order logic into what I call material inference rules and reduce logical inferences to inferences which involve only atomic statements (...)
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  47. Davis Baird (1994). Meaning in a Material Medium. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:441 - 451.score: 60.0
    Recently we have learned how experiment can have a life of its own. However, experiment remains epistemologically disadvantaged. Scientific knowledge must have a theoretical/propositional form. To begin to redress this situation, I discuss three ways in which instruments carry meaning: 1. Scientific instruments can carry tremendous loads of meaning through association, analogy and metaphor. 2. Instrumental models of complicated phenomena work representationally in much the same way as theories. 3. Instruments which create new phenomena establish a new field of (...) possibilities. I suggest that scientists employ a "visual/physical/material logic," analogous to propositional logic, which establishes relations between different material forms. (shrink)
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  48. Matthias Unterhuber (2014). Do Ceteris Paribus Laws Exist? A Regularity-Based Best System Analysis. Erkenntnis 79 (10):1833-1847.score: 60.0
    This paper argues that ceteris paribus (cp) laws exist based on a Lewisian best system analysis of lawhood (BSA). Furthermore, it shows that a BSA faces a second trivialization problem besides the one identified by Lewis. The first point concerns an argument against cp laws by Earman and Roberts. The second point aims to help making some assumptions of the BSA explicit. To address the second trivialization problem, a restriction in terms of natural logical constants is proposed that allows one (...)
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  49. Stephan Blatti (2012). Material Constitution. In Robert Barnard & Neil Manson (eds.), Continuum Companion to Metaphysics. Continuum Publishing. 149-69.score: 54.0
    This paper reviews four leading strategies for addressing the problem of material constitution, along with some of the prominent objections faced by each approach. Sections include (1) "The Orthodox View: Coincident Objects," (2) "Dominant Kinds," (3) "Nihilism," (4) "Revising the Logic of Identity," and (5) "Future Research." Also included is an annotated bibliography.
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  50. Rani Lill Anjum & Johan Arnt Myrstad, All Men Are Animals: Hypothetical, Categorical, or Material?score: 54.0
    The conditional interpretation of general categorical statements like ‘All men are animals’ as universally quantified material conditionals ‘For all x, if x is F, then x is G’ suggests that the logical structure of law statements is conditional rather than categorical. Disregarding the problem that the universally quantified material conditional is trivially true whenever there are no xs that are F, there are some reasons to be sceptical of Frege’s equivalence between categorical and conditional expressions. -/- Now many (...)
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