Search results for 'Sheldon Goldenberg' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    Jamie L. Goldenberg, Tom Pyszczynski, Jeff Greenberg, Sheldon Solomon, Benjamin Kluck & Robin Cornwell (2001). I Am Not an Animal: Mortality Salience, Disgust, and the Denial of Human Creatureliness. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):427.
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  2.  11
    Augustine Brannigan & Sheldon Goldenberg (1988). Social Science Versus Jurisprudence in Wagner : The Study of Pornography, Harm, and the Law of Obscenity in Canada. Social Epistemology 2 (2):107 – 116.
  3.  3
    Augustine Brannigan & Sheldon Goldenberg (1989). 'Neither All the King's Horses nor All the King's Men . . .' A Reply to Soble and Kittay. Social Epistemology 3 (1):54 – 63.
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  4. Maya J. Goldenberg (2013). How Can Feminist Theories of Evidence Assist Clinical Reasoning and Decision-Making? Social Epistemology (TBA):1-28.
    While most of healthcare research and practice fully endorses evidence-based healthcare, a minority view borrows popular themes from philosophy of science like underdetermination and value-ladenness to question the legitimacy of the evidence-based movement’s philosophical underpinnings. While the feminist origins go unacknowledged, those critics adopt a feminist reading of the “gap argument” to challenge the perceived objectivism of evidence-based practice. From there, the critics seem to despair over the “subjective elements” that values introduce to clinical reasoning, demonstrating that they do not (...)
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  5.  56
    Maya J. Goldenberg, Diversity in Epistemic Communities: A Response to Clough. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective Vol. 3, No. 5.
    In Clough’s reply paper to me (http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1aN), she laments how feminist calls for diversity within scientific communities are inadvertently sidelined by our shared feminist empiricist prescriptions. She offers a novel justification for diversity within epistemic communities and challenges me to accept this addendum to my prior prescriptions for biomedical research communities (Goldenberg 2013) on the grounds that they are consistent with the epistemic commitments that I already endorse. In this response, I evaluate and accept her challenge.
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  6.  6
    Kennon M. Sheldon, Melanie Skaggs Sheldon & Richard Osbaldiston (2000). Prosocial Values and Group Assortation. Human Nature 11 (4):387-404.
    Ninety-five freshmen each recruited three peers to play a "group bidding game," an N-person prisoner’s dilemma in which anyone could win movie tickets depending on their scores in the game. Prior to playing, all participants completed a measure of prosocial value orientation. Replicating and extending earlier findings (Sheldon and McGregor 2000), our results show that prosocial participants were at a disadvantage within groups. Despite this vulnerability, prosocial participants did no worse overall than asocial participants because a counteracting group-level advantage (...)
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  7. Maya J. Goldenberg (2006). On Evidence and Evidence-Based Medicine: Lessons From the Philosophy of Science. Social Science and Medicine 62 (11):2621-2632.
    The evidence-based medicine (EBM) movement is touted as a new paradigm in medical education and practice, a description that carries with it an enthusiasm for science that has not been seen since logical positivism flourished (circa 1920–1950). At the same time, the term ‘‘evidence-based medicine’’ has a ring of obviousness to it, as few physicians, one suspects, would claim that they do not attempt to base their clinical decision-making on available evidence. However, the apparent obviousness of EBM can and should (...)
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  8. Maya J. Goldenberg (forthcoming). Public Misunderstanding of Science? Reframing the Problem of Vaccine Hesitancy. Perspectives on Science:552-581.
    Public resistance towards scientific claims regarding vaccine safety is widely thought to stem from public misunderstanding (or ignorance) of science. Repeated failures to alleviate this ignorance make the problem of vaccine hesitancy seem intractable. I challenge this presumption of knowledge deficit and reinterpret vaccine hesitancy to be a problem of public mistrust of scientific experts and institutions. This finding invites new corrective measures: self-scrutiny by our scientific and governmental bodies regarding their own credibility as well as investment in dialogical rather (...)
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  9. W. H. Sheldon (1912). Consistency and Ultimate Dualism. Philosophical Review 21 (4):451-454.
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  10. Maya J. Goldenberg (2009). Iconoclast or Creed? Objectivism, Pragmatism, and the Hierarchy of Evidence. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):168-187.
    Because “evidence” is at issue in evidence-based medicine (EBM), the critical responses to the movement have taken up themes from post-positivist philosophy of science to demonstrate the untenability of the objectivist account of evidence. While these post-positivist critiques seem largely correct, I propose that when they focus their analyses on what counts as evidence, the critics miss important and desirable pragmatic features of the evidence-based approach. This article redirects critical attention toward EBM’s rigid hierarchy of evidence as the culprit of (...)
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  11.  71
    Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson, Vikki Entwistle & Elselijn Kingma (2012). Reason and Value: Making Reasoning Fit for Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):929-937.
    Editors' introduction to 3rd thematic issue on philosophy of medicine.
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  12.  24
    Michael Loughlin, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Robyn Bluhm & Kirstin Borgerson (2010). Philosophy, Ethics, Medicine and Health Care: The Urgent Need for Critical Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):249-259.
  13. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Working for the Cure: Challenging Pink Ribbon Activism [Book Chapter]. In Roma Harris, Nadine Wathen & Sally Wyatt (eds.), [Book] Configuring Health Consumers: Health Work and the Imperative of Personal Responsibility. Eds. R. Harris, N. Wathen, S. Wyatt. Amsterdam: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Palgrave Macmillan
    In accordance with the critical women’s health literature recounting the ways that women are encouraged to submit themselves to various sorts of health “imperatives”, I investigate the messages tacitly conveyed to women in “campaigns for the cure” and breast cancer awareness efforts, which, I argue, overemphasizes a “positive attitude”, healthy lifestyle, and cure rather than prevention of this life-threatening disease. I challenge that the message of hope pervading breast cancer discourse silences the despair felt by many women, furthers a tacit (...)
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  14.  16
    Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Drozdstoj S. Stoyanov, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Kirstin Borgerson, Maya J. Goldenberg & Elselijn Kingma (2013). Explanation, Understanding, Objectivity and Experience. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):415-421.
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  15. W. H. Sheldon (1924). Statistical Law and the Ontological Proof. Philosophical Review 33 (3):286-289.
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  16.  21
    Maya J. Goldenberg (2005). Evidence-Based Ethics? On Evidence-Based Practice and the "Empirical Turn" From Normative Bioethics. BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-9.
    Background The increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics. Discussion The recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current (...)
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  17.  44
    Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Jonathan Fuller, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Kirstin Borgerson, Maya J. Goldenberg & Elselijn Kingma (2014). Philosophy, Medicine and Health Care – Where We Have Come From and Where We Are Going. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):902-907.
  18.  6
    Maya J. Goldenberg (2005). Evidence-Based Ethics? On Evidence-Based Practice and The. BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):11.
    BackgroundThe increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics.DiscussionThe recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current ambivalence toward the (...)
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  19.  34
    Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson & Vikki Entwistle (2011). Virtue, Progress and Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):839-846.
  20. Maya J. Goldenberg (2007). The Problem of Exclusion in Feminist Theory and Politics: A Metaphysical Investigation Into Constructing a Category of 'Woman'. Journal of Gender Studies 16 (2):139-153.
    The precondition of any feminist politics – a usable category of ‘woman’ – has proved to be difficult to construct, even proposed to be impossible, given the ‘problem of exclusion’. This is the inevitable exclusion of at least some women, as their lives or experiences do not fit into the necessary and sufficient condition(s) that denotes group membership. In this paper, I propose that the problem of exclusion arises not because of inappropriate category membership criteria, but because of the presumption (...)
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  21. Maya J. Goldenberg (2012). Defining Quality of Care Persuasively. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):243-261.
    As the quality movement in health care now enters its fourth decade, the language of quality is ubiquitous. Practitioners, organizations, and government agencies alike vociferously testify their commitments to quality and accept numerous forms of governance aimed at improving quality of care. Remarkably, the powerful phrase ‘‘quality of care’’ is rarely defined in the health care literature. Instead it operates as an accepted and assumed goal worth pursuing. The status of evidence-based medicine, for instance, hinges on its ability to improve (...)
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  22.  65
    Sally Sheldon (2005). Reproductive Technologies and the Legal Determination of Fatherhood. Feminist Legal Studies 13 (3):349-362.
  23. W. H. Sheldon (1926). The Spirituality of Time. Journal of Philosophy 23 (6):141-154.
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  24.  7
    Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). From Popperian Science to Normal Science. Commentary on Sestini (2009) 'Epistemology and Ethics of Evidence‐Based Medicine'. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):306-309.
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  25.  2
    Aaron J. Goldenberg, Karen J. Maschke, Steven Joffe, Jeffrey R. Botkin, Erin Rothwell, Thomas H. Murray, Rebecca Anderson, Nicole Deming, Beth F. Rosenthal & Suzanne M. Rivera (2015). IRB Practices and Policies Regarding the Secondary Research Use of Biospecimens. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):32.
    As sharing and secondary research use of biospecimens increases, IRBs and researchers face the challenge of protecting and respecting donors without comprehensive regulations addressing the human subject protection issues posed by biobanking. Variation in IRB biobanking policies about these issues has not been well documented.
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  26.  56
    Sally Sheldon (2001). Unmarried Fathers and Parental Responsibility: A Case for Reform? [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 9 (2):93-118.
    Following a Consultation exercise conducted by the Lord Chancellor's Department, the U.K. Government has announced its intention to amend the Children Act 1989 so that the unmarried father who jointly registers the birth with the mother will acquire parental responsibility automatically. In this paper, I draw on the responses made to the L.C.D. Consultation, in order critically to evaluate the arguments for and against reform. A poverty of relevant empirical research makes it impossible to reach a properly informed view on (...)
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  27.  11
    Maya J. Goldenberg (2011). A Response to Sestini's (2011) Response. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):1004-1005.
  28.  33
    W. H. Sheldon (1931). The Nature of Life. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 28 (13):356-359.
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  29. Wilmon H. Sheldon (1952). What is Intellect? Part One. Philosophy East and West 2 (1):4-19.
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  30.  80
    Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Perspectives on Evidence-Based Healthcare for Women. Journal of Women's Health 19 (7):1235-1238.
    We live in an age of evidence-based healthcare, where the concept of evidence has been avidly and often uncritically embraced as a symbol of legitimacy, truth, and justice. By letting the evidence dictate healthcare decision making from the bedside to the policy level, the normative claims that inform decision making appear to be negotiated fairly—without subjectivity, prejudice, or bias. Thus, the term ‘‘evidence-based’’ is typically read in the health sciences as the empirically adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means (...)
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  31.  16
    Maya J. Goldenberg (2015). Whose Social Values? Evaluating Canada’s ‘Death of Evidence’ Controversy. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):404-424.
    With twentieth- and twenty-first-century philosophy of science’s unfolding acceptance of the nature of scientific inquiry being value-laden, the persistent worry has been that there are no means for legitimate negotiation of the social or non-epistemic values that enter into science. The rejection of the value-free ideal in science has thereby been coupled with the spectres of indiscriminate relativism and bias in scientific inquiry. I challenge this view in the context of recently expressed concerns regarding Canada's death of evidence controversy. The (...)
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  32.  64
    Maya J. Goldenberg (2012). Innovating Medical Knowledge: Undestanding Evidence-Based Medicine as a Socio-Medical Phenomenon. In Nikolaos Sitaras (ed.), Evidence-Based Medicine: Closer to Patients or Scientists? InTech Open Science
    Because few would object to evidence-based medicine’s (EBM) principal task of basing medical decisionmaking on the most judicious and up-to-date evidence, the debate over this prolific movement may seem puzzling. Who, one may ask, could be against evidence (Carr-Hill, 2006)? Yet this question belies the sophistication of the evidence-based movement. This chapter presents the evidence-based approach as a socio-medical phenomenon and seeks to explain and negotiate the points of disagreement between supporters and detractors. This is done by casting EBM as (...)
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  33. W. H. Sheldon (1945). Critique of Naturalism. Journal of Philosophy 42 (10):253-270.
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  34.  51
    S. Sheldon (2009). A Missed Opportunity to Reform an Outdated Law. Clinical Ethics 4 (1):3-5.
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  35.  6
    Howard Goldenberg (forthcoming). The Clinician and Detention. Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2016-103371.
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  36.  24
    S. Sheldon (2004). Should Selecting Saviour Siblings Be Banned? Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):533-537.
    By using tissue typing in conjunction with preimplantation genetic diagnosis doctors are able to pick a human embryo for implantation which, if all goes well, will become a “saviour sibling”, a brother or sister capable of donating life-saving tissue to an existing child.This paper addresses the question of whether this form of selection should be banned and concludes that it should not. Three main prohibitionist arguments are considered and found wanting: the claim that saviour siblings would be treated as commodities; (...)
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  37. W. H. Sheldon (1922). The Soul and Matter. Philosophical Review 31 (2):103-134.
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  38.  35
    Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson & Robyn Bluhm (2009). The Nature of Evidence in Evidence-Based Medicine: Guest Editors' Introduction. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):164-167.
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  39. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). From Popperian Science to Normal Science. Commentary on Sestini (2010). Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):306-310.
  40.  15
    W. H. Sheldon (1931). Biological Principles. A Critical Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 28 (14):381-384.
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  41.  13
    G. K. D. Crozier & Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Jennifer Caseldine-Bracht is a Ph. D. Student in the Department of Philosophy at Michigan State University. She is a Research Associate for the Institute of Human Rights at Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne. [REVIEW] International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1).
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  42.  23
    Sally Sheldon (2004). Gender Equality and Reproductive Decision-Making. Feminist Legal Studies 12 (3):303-316.
    In Evans, both the U.K. High Court and Court of Appeal upheld Howard Johnston’s right to refuse Natallie Evans access to the stored embryos which represented her only hope of having a child which was genetically her own. In this note, I focus on claims of gender (in)equality in the resolution of Evans. My argument is that such claims are often made all too easily, without full consideration of the problems of advancing them in the context of procreative decision-making, where (...)
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  43.  21
    Sally Sheldon (1993). “Who is the Mother to Make the Judgment?”: The Constructions of Woman in English Abortion Law. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 1 (1):3-22.
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  44. S. Sheldon (1999). Beyond Control: Medical Power and Abortion Law (Kate Diesfeld). Feminist Legal Studies 7 (1):95-98.
     
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  45.  7
    Julie McCandless & Sally Sheldon (2010). “No Father Required”? The Welfare Assessment in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008. Feminist Legal Studies 18 (3):201-225.
    Of all the changes to the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 that were introduced in 2008 by legislation of the same name, foremost to excite media attention and popular controversy was the amendment of the so-called welfare clause. This clause forms part of the licensing conditions which must be met by any clinic before offering those treatment services covered by the legislation. The 2008 Act deleted the statutory requirement that clinicians consider the need for a father of any potential (...)
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  46.  16
    David C. Geary, M. Catherine DeSoto, Mary K. Hoard, Melanie Skaggs Sheldon & M. Lynne Cooper (2001). Estrogens and Relationship Jealousy. Human Nature 12 (4):299-320.
    The relation between sex hormones and responses to partner infidelity was explored in two studies reported here. The first confirmed the standard sex difference in relationship jealousy, that males (n=133) are relatively more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity and females (n=159) by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The study also revealed that females using hormone-based birth control (n=61) tended more toward sexual jealousy than did other females, and reported more intense affective responses to partner infidelity (n=77). In study two, 47 (...)
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  47.  48
    Sally Sheldon & Stephen Wilkinson (1998). Female Genital Mutilation and Cosmetic Surgery: Regulating Non-Therapeutic Body Modification. Bioethics 12 (4):263–285.
  48.  30
    Tim Kasser & Kennon M. Sheldon (2009). Time Affluence as a Path Toward Personal Happiness and Ethical Business Practice: Empirical Evidence From Four Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):243 - 255.
    Many business practices focus on maximizing material affluence, or wealth, despite the fact that a growing empirical literature casts doubt on whether money can buy happiness. We therefore propose that businesses consider the possibility of "time affluence" as an alternative model for improving employee well-being and ethical business practice. Across four studies, results consistently showed that, even after controlling for material affluence, the experience of time affluence was positively related to subjective well-being. Studies 3 and 4 further demonstrated that the (...)
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  49.  2
    Tina S. Sheldon & W. Michael Hoffman (2005). Does Higher Education Make the Grade in Institution‐Wide Ethics and Compliance Programs?1. Business and Society Review 110 (3):249-267.
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  50.  10
    W. H. Sheldon (1928). Rifts in the Universe. A Study of the Historic Dichotomies and Modalities of Being. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 25 (24):665-668.
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