Search results for 'Sheldon Goldenberg' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Augustine Brannigan & Sheldon Goldenberg (1988). Social Science Versus Jurisprudence in Wagner : The Study of Pornography, Harm, and the Law of Obscenity in Canada. Social Epistemology 2 (2):107 – 116.score: 240.0
  2. Augustine Brannigan & Sheldon Goldenberg (1989). 'Neither All the King's Horses nor All the King's Men . . .' A Reply to Soble and Kittay. Social Epistemology 3 (1):54 – 63.score: 240.0
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  3. Jamie L. Goldenberg, Tom Pyszczynski, Jeff Greenberg, Sheldon Solomon, Benjamin Kluck & Robin Cornwell (2001). I Am Not an Animal: Mortality Salience, Disgust, and the Denial of Human Creatureliness. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):427.score: 240.0
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  4. Maya J. Goldenberg (2013). How Can Feminist Theories of Evidence Assist Clinical Reasoning and Decision-Making? Social Epistemology (TBA):1-28.score: 60.0
    While most of healthcare research and practice fully endorses evidence-based healthcare, a minority view borrows popular themes from philosophy of science like underdetermination and value-ladenness to question the legitimacy of the evidence-based movement’s philosophical underpinnings. While the feminist origins go unacknowledged, those critics adopt a feminist reading of the “gap argument” to challenge the perceived objectivism of evidence-based practice. From there, the critics seem to despair over the “subjective elements” that values introduce to clinical reasoning, demonstrating that they do not (...)
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  5. Maya J. Goldenberg, Diversity in Epistemic Communities: A Response to Clough. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective Vol. 3, No. 5.score: 60.0
    In Clough’s reply paper to me (http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1aN), she laments how feminist calls for diversity within scientific communities are inadvertently sidelined by our shared feminist empiricist prescriptions. She offers a novel justification for diversity within epistemic communities and challenges me to accept this addendum to my prior prescriptions for biomedical research communities (Goldenberg 2013) on the grounds that they are consistent with the epistemic commitments that I already endorse. In this response, I evaluate and accept her challenge.
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  6. Kennon M. Sheldon, Melanie Skaggs Sheldon & Richard Osbaldiston (2000). Prosocial Values and Group Assortation. Human Nature 11 (4):387-404.score: 60.0
    Ninety-five freshmen each recruited three peers to play a "group bidding game," an N-person prisoner’s dilemma in which anyone could win movie tickets depending on their scores in the game. Prior to playing, all participants completed a measure of prosocial value orientation. Replicating and extending earlier findings (Sheldon and McGregor 2000), our results show that prosocial participants were at a disadvantage within groups. Despite this vulnerability, prosocial participants did no worse overall than asocial participants because a counteracting group-level advantage (...)
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  7. Maya J. Goldenberg (2006). On Evidence and Evidence-Based Medicine: Lessons From the Philosophy of Science. Social Science and Medicine 62 (11):2621-2632.score: 30.0
    The evidence-based medicine (EBM) movement is touted as a new paradigm in medical education and practice, a description that carries with it an enthusiasm for science that has not been seen since logical positivism flourished (circa 1920–1950). At the same time, the term ‘‘evidence-based medicine’’ has a ring of obviousness to it, as few physicians, one suspects, would claim that they do not attempt to base their clinical decision-making on available evidence. However, the apparent obviousness of EBM can and should (...)
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  8. Maya J. Goldenberg (2009). Iconoclast or Creed? Objectivism, Pragmatism, and the Hierarchy of Evidence. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):168-187.score: 30.0
    Because “evidence” is at issue in evidence-based medicine (EBM), the critical responses to the movement have taken up themes from post-positivist philosophy of science to demonstrate the untenability of the objectivist account of evidence. While these post-positivist critiques seem largely correct, I propose that when they focus their analyses on what counts as evidence, the critics miss important and desirable pragmatic features of the evidence-based approach. This article redirects critical attention toward EBM’s rigid hierarchy of evidence as the culprit of (...)
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  9. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Working for the Cure: Challenging Pink Ribbon Activism [Book Chapter]. In Roma Harris, Nadine Wathen & Sally Wyatt (eds.), [Book] Configuring Health Consumers: Health Work and the Imperative of Personal Responsibility. Eds. R. Harris, N. Wathen, S. Wyatt. Amsterdam: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 30.0
    In accordance with the critical women’s health literature recounting the ways that women are encouraged to submit themselves to various sorts of health “imperatives”, I investigate the messages tacitly conveyed to women in “campaigns for the cure” and breast cancer awareness efforts, which, I argue, overemphasizes a “positive attitude”, healthy lifestyle, and cure rather than prevention of this life-threatening disease. I challenge that the message of hope pervading breast cancer discourse silences the despair felt by many women, furthers a tacit (...)
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  10. Maya J. Goldenberg (2012). Defining Quality of Care Persuasively. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):243-261.score: 30.0
    As the quality movement in health care now enters its fourth decade, the language of quality is ubiquitous. Practitioners, organizations, and government agencies alike vociferously testify their commitments to quality and accept numerous forms of governance aimed at improving quality of care. Remarkably, the powerful phrase ‘‘quality of care’’ is rarely defined in the health care literature. Instead it operates as an accepted and assumed goal worth pursuing. The status of evidence-based medicine, for instance, hinges on its ability to improve (...)
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  11. Maya J. Goldenberg (2007). The Problem of Exclusion in Feminist Theory and Politics: A Metaphysical Investigation Into Constructing a Category of 'Woman'. Journal of Gender Studies 16 (2):139-153.score: 30.0
    The precondition of any feminist politics – a usable category of ‘woman’ – has proved to be difficult to construct, even proposed to be impossible, given the ‘problem of exclusion’. This is the inevitable exclusion of at least some women, as their lives or experiences do not fit into the necessary and sufficient condition(s) that denotes group membership. In this paper, I propose that the problem of exclusion arises not because of inappropriate category membership criteria, but because of the presumption (...)
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  12. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Perspectives on Evidence-Based Healthcare for Women. Journal of Women's Health 19 (7):1235-1238.score: 30.0
    We live in an age of evidence-based healthcare, where the concept of evidence has been avidly and often uncritically embraced as a symbol of legitimacy, truth, and justice. By letting the evidence dictate healthcare decision making from the bedside to the policy level, the normative claims that inform decision making appear to be negotiated fairly—without subjectivity, prejudice, or bias. Thus, the term ‘‘evidence-based’’ is typically read in the health sciences as the empirically adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means (...)
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  13. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Clinical Evidence and the Absent Body in Medical Phenomenology On the Need for a New Phenomenology of Medicine. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1):43-71.score: 30.0
    Medical discourse currently manages two broad visionary movements: "evidence-based medicine," the effort to make clinical medicine more responsive to the medical research, and "patient-centered care," the platform for a more humane health-care encounter. There have been strong calls to synthesize the two as "evidence-based patient-centred care" (Lacy and Backer 2008; see also Borgmeyer 2005; Baumann, Lewis, and Gutterman 2007; Krahn and Naglie 2008), yet many question the compatibility of the two competing programs.This might sound to some like a new version (...)
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  14. Maya J. Goldenberg (2012). Innovating Medical Knowledge: Undestanding Evidence-Based Medicine as a Socio-Medical Phenomenon. In Nikolaos Sitaras (ed.), Evidence-Based Medicine: Closer to Patients or Scientists? InTech Open Science.score: 30.0
    Because few would object to evidence-based medicine’s (EBM) principal task of basing medical decisionmaking on the most judicious and up-to-date evidence, the debate over this prolific movement may seem puzzling. Who, one may ask, could be against evidence (Carr-Hill, 2006)? Yet this question belies the sophistication of the evidence-based movement. This chapter presents the evidence-based approach as a socio-medical phenomenon and seeks to explain and negotiate the points of disagreement between supporters and detractors. This is done by casting EBM as (...)
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  15. Daniel S. Goldenberg (1975). The Algebra of the I Ching and its Philosophical Implications. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 2 (2):149-179.score: 30.0
  16. W. H. Sheldon (1946). Are Naturalists Materialists? Journal of Philosophy 43 (April):197-209.score: 30.0
  17. Sally Sheldon & Stephen Wilkinson (1998). Female Genital Mutilation and Cosmetic Surgery: Regulating Non-Therapeutic Body Modification. Bioethics 12 (4):263–285.score: 30.0
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  18. W. H. Sheldon (1945). Critique of Naturalism. Journal of Philosophy 42 (10):253-270.score: 30.0
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  19. Maya J. Goldenberg (2007). Health. In [REFERENCE] Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  20. Tim Kasser & Kennon M. Sheldon (2009). Time Affluence as a Path Toward Personal Happiness and Ethical Business Practice: Empirical Evidence From Four Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):243 - 255.score: 30.0
    Many business practices focus on maximizing material affluence, or wealth, despite the fact that a growing empirical literature casts doubt on whether money can buy happiness. We therefore propose that businesses consider the possibility of "time affluence" as an alternative model for improving employee well-being and ethical business practice. Across four studies, results consistently showed that, even after controlling for material affluence, the experience of time affluence was positively related to subjective well-being. Studies 3 and 4 further demonstrated that the (...)
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  21. Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson & Vikki Entwistle (2011). Virtue, Progress and Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):839-846.score: 30.0
  22. W. H. Sheldon (1950). The Absolute Truth of Hedonism. Journal of Philosophy 47 (10):285-304.score: 30.0
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  23. S. Sheldon (2004). Should Selecting Saviour Siblings Be Banned? Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):533-537.score: 30.0
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  24. Maya J. Goldenberg, Resituating Evidence in Feminist Science Studies.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the conclusions that one must draw from the finding that there are values in science. The value-ladenness of scientific claims puts the nature and role of empirical evidence into question, as seen in recent discussions in the philosophy of medicine regarding evidence-based medicine and feminist science studies, which maintains the normativity of its feminist claims. Within the critical literature and debates surrounding evidence-based medicine (EBM), one finds a championing of the lessons learned from post-positivist science studies: the (...)
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  25. Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson & Robyn Bluhm (2009). The Nature of Evidence in Evidence-Based Medicine: Guest Editors' Introduction. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):164-167.score: 30.0
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  26. S. Sheldon (2009). A Missed Opportunity to Reform an Outdated Law. Clinical Ethics 4 (1):3-5.score: 30.0
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  27. Sally Sheldon & Michael Thomson (eds.) (1998). Feminist Perspectives on Health Care Law. Cavendish Pub..score: 30.0
    This book brings together new work by some of the foremost writers in the health care law arena. It presents exciting new insights,drawing on feminist theory and methodology to further our understanding of health care law. Whilst the book makes a real contribution to both feminist debates and the analysis of this area of law, it is also accessible to the undergraduate student who is approaching this area of legal scholarship and feminist jurisprudence for the first time. Its focus is (...)
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  28. Maya J. Goldenberg (2011). A Response to Sestini's (2011) Response. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):1004-1005.score: 30.0
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  29. Georg Goldenberg (2002). Loss of Visual Imagery: Neuropsychological Evidence in Search for a Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):191-191.score: 30.0
    Observations on patients who lost visual imagery after brain damage call into question the notion that the knowledge subserving visual imagery is “tacit.” Dissociations between deficient imagery and preserved recognition of objects suggest that imagery is exclusively based on explicit knowledge, whereas retrieval of “tacit” visual knowledge is bound to the presence of the object and the task of recognizing it.
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  30. Barbara Secker, Maya J. Goldenberg, Barbara Gibson, Frank Wagner, Bob Parke, Jonathan Breslin, Alison Thompson, Jonathan Lear & Peter Singer (2006). Just Regionalisation: Rehabilitating Care for People with Disabilities and Chronic Illnesses. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-13.score: 30.0
    Background Regionalised models of health care delivery have important implications for people with disabilities and chronic illnesses yet the ethical issues surrounding disability and regionalisation have not yet been explored. Although there is ethics-related research into disability and chronic illness, studies of regionalisation experiences, and research directed at improving health systems for these patient populations, to our knowledge these streams of research have not been brought together. Using the Canadian province of Ontario as a case study, we address this gap (...)
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  31. W. H. Sheldon (1914). A Definition of Causation. I. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 11 (8):197-208.score: 30.0
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  32. Mark Sheldon (1979). Spinoza, Imagination and Chaos. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):119-132.score: 30.0
  33. W. H. Sheldon (1921). Is the Conservation of Energy Proved of the Human Body? Journal of Philosophy 18 (22):589-600.score: 30.0
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  34. M. Sheldon (2009). Reasoning Ethically: When Subjects Do Not Understand English. Research Ethics 5 (1):21-22.score: 30.0
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  35. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Clinical Evidence and the Absent Body in Medical Phenomenology. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethiics 3 (1):43-71.score: 30.0
    The once animated efforts in medical phenomenology to integrate the art and

    science of medicine (or to humanize scientific medicine) have fallen out of philosophical fashion. Yet the current competing medical discourses of evidencebased medicine and patient-centered care suggest that this theoretical endeavor requires renewed attention. In this paper, I attempt to enliven the debate by discussing theoretical weaknesses in the way the “lived body” has operated in the medical phenomenology literature—the problem of the absent body—and highlight how evidence-based medicine has (...)
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  36. Maya J. Goldenberg (2005). Evidence-Based Ethics? On Evidence-Based Practice and the "Empirical Turn" From Normative Bioethics. BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-9.score: 30.0
    Background The increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics. Discussion The recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current (...)
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  37. Maya J. Goldenberg (2003). Feminists Doing Ethics. Teaching Philosophy 26 (1):114-117.score: 30.0
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  38. Mark Sheldon (2003). Male Circumcision, Religious Preferences, and the Question of Harm. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):61-62.score: 30.0
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  39. W. H. Sheldon (1941). On the Nature of Mind. Journal of Philosophy 38 (April):197-206.score: 30.0
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  40. William James, Halbert Hains Britan, George H. Sabine, John Grier Hibben, G. A. Tawney, Charles M. Bakewell, W. H. Sheldon, Ernest Albee, Lewis F. Hite, I. W. Riley, A. T. Ormond, F. C. French & Walter G. Everett (1907). The Sixth Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 4 (3):64-76.score: 30.0
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  41. W. H. Sheldon (1929). Necessary Truths and the Necessary Being. Journal of Philosophy 26 (8):197-209.score: 30.0
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  42. Maya J. Goldenberg (2001 MA thesis). The Theory and Practice of Biomedical Ethics : A Troubled Divide. Dissertation, McGill Universityscore: 30.0
    Biomedical ethics does not lend itself to easy categorisation as either a 'theoretical' or a 'practical' enterprise because inquiry into the quandaries of morality requires both situational and 'translocal' perspectives. These types of investigation bring into question the legitimacy of the theory/practice divide that has dominated intellectual thought since antiquity. This division hinders the development of bioethics by fostering internal dispute within the discipline regarding appropriate methodology and the practice of clinical ethics. In this thesis, I argue that much of (...)
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  43. Sharon L. R. Kardia, Jane P. Sheldon, Elizabeth M. Petty, Merle Feldbaum, Elizabeth S. Anderson, Angela D. Lanie & Toby Epstein Jayaratne, Exploring the Public Understanding of Basic Genetic Concepts.score: 30.0
    It is predicted that the rapid acquisition of new genetic knowledge and related applications during the next decade will have significant implications for virtually all members of society. Currently, most people get exposed to information about genes and genetics only through stories publicized in the media. We sought to understand how individuals in the general population used and understood the concepts of “genetics” and “genes.” During in-depth one-on-one telephone interviews with adults in the United States, we asked questions exploring their (...)
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  44. W. H. Sheldon (1923). Another Form of the Ontological Proof. Philosophical Review 32 (4):355-372.score: 30.0
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  45. W. H. Sheldon (1902). The Concept of the Negative. Philosophical Review 11 (5):485-496.score: 30.0
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  46. David A. Sheldon (1979). The Kantian Synthesis and Sonata Form. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (4):455-465.score: 30.0
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  47. Wilmon H. Sheldon (1956). What Can Western Philosophy Contribute to Eastern? Philosophy East and West 5 (4):291-304.score: 30.0
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  48. Maya J. Goldenberg (2002). A Rulebook for Arguments, 3rd Edition. Teaching Philosophy 25 (4):361-364.score: 30.0
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  49. Maya J. Goldenberg (2006). Letter to the Editor: The Doctor-Patient Relationship in the Age of Evidence-Based Health Care (andNotthe “Post-Managed Care Era”): A Response to G. Caleb Alexander and John D. Lantos. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):W32-W32.score: 30.0
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  50. J. H. Sheldon (1934). Psycho-Analysis and its Derivatives. By H. Crichton-Miller, M.A., M.D. M.R.C.P., (London: Thornton Butterworth Ltd. 1933. Pp. 255. Price 2S. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 9 (34):240-.score: 30.0
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