Results for 'Concept of progress'

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  1. The Role of Justification in the Ordinary Concept of Scientific Progress.Moti Mizrahi & Wesley Buckwalter - 2014 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 45 (1):151-166.
    Alexander Bird and Darrell Rowbottom have argued for two competing accounts of the concept of scientific progress. For Bird, progress consists in the accumulation of scientific knowledge. For Rowbottom, progress consists in the accumulation of true scientific beliefs. Both appeal to intuitions elicited by thought experiments in support of their views, and it seems fair to say that the debate has reached an impasse. In an attempt to avoid this stalemate, we conduct a systematic study of (...)
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  2. A Concept of Progress for Normative Economics.Philippe Mongin - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):19-54.
    The paper discusses the sense in which the changes undergone by normative economics in the twentieth century can be said to be progressive. A simple criterion is proposed to decide whether a sequence of normative theories is progressive. This criterion is put to use on the historical transition from the new welfare economics to social choice theory. The paper reconstructs this classic case, and eventually concludes that the latter theory was progressive compared with the former. It also briefly comments on (...)
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  3.  7
    Recognition as a Reference Point for a Concept of Progress in Critical Theory.Ejvind Hansen - 2009 - Critical Horizons 10 (1):99-117.
    In this paper I discuss the recent attempt of Axel Honneth of establishing a robust notion of progress through reference to recognitive structures. I claim that two strategies can be found in his writings for founding such a claim. On the one hand he tries to found the notion of progress on how differentiated the recognitive structures are. On the other hand he tries to found it on certain empirically revealed anthropological and psychological constants. I argue that both (...)
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  4. An Alternative to Kitcher's Theory of Conceptual Progress and His Account of the Change of the Gene Concept.Ingo Brigandt - manuscript
    The present paper discusses Kitcher’s framework for studying conceptual change and progress. Kitcher’s core notion of reference potential is hard to apply to concrete cases. In addition, an account of conceptual change as change in reference potential misses some important aspects of conceptual change and conceptual progress. I propose an alternative framework that focuses on the inferences and explanations supported by scientific concepts. The application of my approach to the history of the gene concept offers a better (...)
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  5. The Ancient Concept of Progress and Other Essays on Greek Literature and Belief.E. R. Dodds - 1973 - Oxford University Press.
    This provocative collection of essays written by the influential Greek scholar E. R. Dodds between 1929 and 1971. represents the wide range of his literary and philosophical interests. Insightful and learned, the essays combine profound scholarship with the lucid humanity of a teacher aware of the special value of Greek studies in the modern world.
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  6.  13
    Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW]Joe Cain - 1999 - Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):197-204.
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  7. The Ancient Concept of Progress: And Other Essays on Greek Literature and Belief.E. R. Dodds - 1973 - Oxford University Press UK.
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  8. Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology.Michael Ruse - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (3):515-521.
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  9. The Biological Concept of Progress.F. J. Ayala - 1974 - In F. Ayala & T. Dobzhansky (eds.), Studies in the Philosophy of Biology. University of California Press. pp. 339--354.
     
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  10.  19
    The Concept of Progress in Wittgenstein's Thought.Kevin Cahill - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (1):71-100.
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    Reviews-Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW]Ron Amundson - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (3):515-521.
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  12.  8
    Review. Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology. Michael Ruse.R. Amundson - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (3):515-521.
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    Maine's Concept of Progress.Brian Smith - 1963 - Journal of the History of Ideas 24 (3):407.
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    Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology by Michael Ruse. [REVIEW]Thomas Junker - 1998 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 89:149-150.
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  15.  4
    The Concept of Progress in Organic Evolution.George Simpson - 1974 - Social Research 41.
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  16.  18
    Moving with the Times E. R. Dodds: The Ancient Concept of Progress and Other Essays on Greek Literature and Belief. Pp. Vi + 218. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1973. Cloth, £4·25. [REVIEW]H. C. Baldry - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (01):55-56.
  17. Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW]Christopher D. Horvath - 2001 - International Studies in Philosophy 33 (4):140-142.
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  18. Monad to Man: The Concept of Progress in Evolutionary Biology. Michael Ruse.Thomas Junker - 1998 - Isis 89 (1):149-150.
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  19.  4
    The Genesis of the Concept of Scientific Progress.Edgar Zilsel - 1945 - Journal of the History of Ideas 6 (1/4):325.
  20.  12
    19. The Concept of Biological Progress.Francisco J. Ayala - 1974 - In Francisco Jose Ayala & Theodosius Grigorievich Dobzhansky (eds.), Studies in the Philosophy of Biology: Reduction and Related Problems. University of California Press. pp. 339.
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  21.  4
    The Concept of Civilization in Spain, 1754-2005: From Progress to Identity.Javier Fernandez Sebastian - 2008 - Contributions to the History of Concepts 4 (1):81-105.
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  22.  4
    Temporalization of Concepts: Reflections on the Concept of Unnati (Progress) in Hindi (18701900).Mohinder Singh - 2012 - Contributions to the History of Concepts 7 (1):51-71.
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  23.  5
    Concept of Biological Progress and Information as Indication and Measure of Ontic Growth.Tonći Kokić & Josip Balabanić - 2004 - Prolegomena 3 (2):119-134.
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  24. The Concept of Social Progress: An Epistemological Moment.Bazac Ana - 2016 - Wisdom 1 (6):6.
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  25. On the Concept of Social Progress.I. Sykora - 1980 - Filosoficky Casopis 28 (1):36-45.
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  26. The Folk Concept of Intentional Action: Philosophical and Experimental Issues.Edouard Machery - 2008 - Mind and Language 23 (2):165–189.
    Recent experimental fi ndings by Knobe and others ( Knobe, 2003; Nadelhoffer, 2006b; Nichols and Ulatowski, 2007 ) have been at the center of a controversy about the nature of the folk concept of intentional action. I argue that the signifi cance of these fi ndings has been overstated. My discussion is two-pronged. First, I contend that barring a consensual theory of conceptual competence, the signifi cance of these experimental fi ndings for the nature of the concept of (...)
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  27.  45
    The Notion of Progress in Evolutionary Biology – the Unresolved Problem and an Empirical Suggestion.Bernd Rosslenbroich - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):41-70.
    Modern biology is ambivalent about the notion of evolutionary progress. Although most evolutionists imply in their writings that they still understand large-scale macroevolution as a somewhat progressive process, the use of the term “progress” is increasingly criticized and avoided. The paper shows that this ambivalence has a long history and results mainly from three problems: (1) The term “progress” carries historical, theoretical and social implications which are not congruent with modern knowledge of the course of evolution; (2) (...)
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  28. The Concept of Strong and Weak Virtual Reality.Andreas Martin Lisewski - 2006 - Minds and Machines 16 (2):201-219.
    We approach the virtual reality phenomenon by studying its relationship to set theory. This approach offers a characterization of virtual reality in set theoretic terms, and we investigate the case where this is done using the wellfoundedness property. Our hypothesis is that non-wellfounded sets (so-called hypersets) give rise to a different quality of virtual reality than do familiar wellfounded sets. To elaborate this hypothesis, we describe virtual reality through Sommerhoff’s categories of first- and second-order self-awareness; introduced as necessary conditions for (...)
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  29.  34
    The Concept of Normativity From Philosophy to Medicine: An Overview.Claude Debru - 2011 - Medicine Studies 3 (1):1-7.
    In this introductory paper, I try to give an overview of the concept of normativity in its philosophical history and its contemporary interpretations and uses in different fields. From philosophy of logic and mathematics to philosophy of language and mind, and to philosophy of medicine and care, normativity is found as a key concept pointing at the possibility of scientific and technical progress and improvement of human life in the interaction between the individual and his environment.
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  30.  12
    The Concept of Brain Death Did Not Evolve to Benefit Organ Transplants.C. Machado, J. Kerein, Y. Ferrer, L. Portela, M. de La C. Garcia & J. M. Manero - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):197-200.
    Although it is commonly believed that the concept of brain death was developed to benefit organ transplants, it evolved independently. Transplantation owed its development to advances in surgery and immunosuppressive treatment; BD owed its origin to the development of intensive care. The first autotransplant was achieved in the early 1900s, when studies of increased intracranial pressure causing respiratory arrest with preserved heartbeat were reported. Between 1902 and 1950, the BD concept was supported by the discovery of EEG, Crile’s (...)
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  31.  44
    On Benjamin's Theses, or the Utility of the Concept of Historical Time.D. Renton - 2012 - European Journal of Political Theory 11 (4):380-393.
    :Roger Griffin’s paper points towards the importance of historical time when discussing fascism. Walter Benjamin’s Theses, the discussion of which informs Griffin’s paper, engages with the topic of historical time at several points, especially in its discussion of the theory of progress that Benjamin found in German Social Democracy, to which the Theses was directly opposed. Revisiting sympathetically a theory of progress akin to that of Karl Kautsky and other Marxist writers enables us to add substance to the (...)
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  32.  24
    The Concept of Self-Oscillations and the Rise of Synergetics Ideas in the Theory of Nonlinear Oscillations.A. Pechenkin - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 33 (2):269-295.
    I take the phrase ''the theory of nonlinear oscillations'' to identify a historical phenomenon. Under this heading a powerful school in Soviet science, L. I. Mandelstam's school, developed its version of what was later called ''nonlinear dynamics''. The theory of nonlinear oscillations was formed around the concept of self-oscillations, which was elaborated by Mandelstam's graduate student A. A. Andronov. This concept determined the paradigm of the theory of nonlinear oscillations as well as its ideology, that is, a set (...)
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  33.  32
    The Concept of God.Asokananda Prosad - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:289-297.
    “Rethinking Philosophy Today” is very much applicable in every respect when we delve deep in philosophy to co-ordinate science and religion. Since science has a great part to set people brood over religion, we must think today over and over again about something very specific in the world of religion from the point of view of science to enlighten philosophy. In every religion, as a matter of fact, Concept of God is deeply thought of. Earlier we could think about (...)
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    Rethinking the Concept of Democracy.Oliver Hidalgo - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 46:21-28.
    The conceptual history of democracy suggests that the overwhelming success of the concept is most of all due to its ability to subsume very different historical ideas and realities under the same semantics. Moreover, the historical evolution of the term is repugnant to an unequivocal definition because it contains some very significant paradoxa, aporias and contradictions. This obviously opens the concept of democracy to some further discussions about the conceivable legitimacy of Non-Western social and political systems. On the (...)
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  35.  4
    The Concept of Brain Death Did Not Evolve to Benefit Organ Transplants (Vol 33, Pg 197, 2007).Calixto Machado, Julius Kerein, Yazmina Ferrer, Liana Portela & Maria de la C. Garcia - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (6):369-369.
    Although it is commonly believed that the concept of brain death was developed to benefit organ transplants, it evolved independently. Transplantation owed its development to advances in surgery and immunosuppressive treatment; BD owed its origin to the development of intensive care. The first autotransplant was achieved in the early 1900s, when studies of increased intracranial pressure causing respiratory arrest with preserved heartbeat were reported. Between 1902 and 1950, the BD concept was supported by the discovery of EEG, Crile’s (...)
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  36.  22
    The Idea of Progress in Sadean Thought: Notes on La Philosophie Dans le Boudoir.Poliana dos Santos - 2014 - Trans/Form/Ação 37 (2):147-166.
    Este artigo pretende, por meio da análise literária e da leitura de Freud , investigar a concepção de progresso em Sade, tomando como objeto de estudo o romance A filosofia na alcova . Defende-se que a ficção sadeana resulta de um conflito entre indivíduo e sociedade, de cujo resultado depende a felicidade humana. Esta seria alcançada com a superação dos obstáculos impostos pela educação, pela cultura e pela abertura da sociedade para a satisfação de todos os prazeres do sentido. The (...)
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  37.  5
    Collingwood and the Idea of Progress.W. Jan van der Dussen - 1990 - History and Theory 29 (4):21.
    The idea of progress was lent much importance by Collingwood, but it is difficult to elucidate his views on the idea. Considering his views of other related concepts -change, development, and process-aids the understanding of his idea of progress. Collingwood's treatment of the concept of historical progress shows a lack of consistency, when he denies on the one hand that ways of life can be grasped, while on the other he believes that historical periods may be (...)
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  38. On the Concept of Sexual Perversion.Kristie Miller - 2010 - Philosophical Quarterly 60 (241):808-830.
    Why has little progress been made in resolving the debate about the concept of sexual perversion? I suggest that the stalemate is due to misunderstandings and poor methodology. I develop a new methodology for resolving disputes about the correct analysis of the contents of concepts where the disputes have social and political ramifications. When deciding between competing analyses of a concept, we should not just consider facts about our inferential and judgemental dispositions with respect to that (...); we should also incorporate facts about its desired social function. This provides additional resources for making decisions about which analysis to choose, when information about our dispositions alone cannot determine an answer. (shrink)
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  39.  44
    Anne Frank's Tree: Thoughts on Domination and the Paradox of Progress.Eric Katz - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):283-293.
    Consider the significance of Anne Frank's horse chestnut tree. During her years of hiding in the secret annex, Anne thought of the tree as a symbol of freedom, happiness, and peace. As a stand-in for all of Nature, Anne saw the tree as that part of the universe that could not be destroyed by human evil. In this essay, I use Anne's tree as a starting point for a discussion of the domination of both nature and humanity. I connect the (...)
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  40.  2
    Hegel’s Concept of Education From the Point of View of His Idea of ‘Second Nature’.Jure Zovko - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):652-661.
    This article explores Hegels concept of education within the context of his idea of ‘second nature’. Hegel believes that institutional life forms, which have been formed through education, culture, technical and social progress, constitute the ‘second nature’ of human beings. The immediacy of institutional forms which act as humans’ ‘second nature’ is the product of social and cultural mediation. The phenomenon of morality is here of central importance, because through morality the natural arbitrariness of the will is transformed (...)
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  41.  23
    Being and Doing in the Concept of God.David M. Woodruff - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (3-4):313-320.
    In this essay I use the notion of divine values, those values analytically assigned to the concept of God, as a means of understanding replies to criticisms of open theism. I begin by orienting open theism according to the divine values open theist’s embrace within the larger context of relational theology. I then present three criticisms, a theological criticism, a practical criticism and a philosophical criticism and an open theist reply to each. Finally, I attempt to show the underlying (...)
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  42.  16
    The Concept of the Gene in Psychiatric Genetics and its Consequences for the Concept of Mental Illness.Vanessa Lux - 2008 - Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):65-77.
    At this point in time, it is hard to say which consequences for the concept of mental illness result from modern genetics. Current research projects are trying to find significant statistical correlations between the diagnosis of a disease and a gene locus or an endophenotype. Up until now, there has not been any identification of alleles or mutations causing mental illness. In the meantime, the relations between the genetic basis and the disease are given the term genetic vulnerability as (...)
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  43. Why Cannot the Term Development Just Be Dropped Altogether? Some Reflections on the Concept of Maturation as Alternative to Development Discourse.Ernst M. Conradie - 2016 - Hts Theological Studies 72 (4):1-11.
    This contribution is aimed at some provocation by questioning the basic assumptions of current development discourse. It asks for conceptual clarification and differentiation on the meaning of various process terms. It needs to be recognised that the word development remains a metaphor than can indeed be extended but can also become over-extended and ossified. The concept of development is then contrasted with the process of maturation. It is argued that the concept of maturation is, better able to indicate (...)
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  44. Progress in Self Psychology, V. 10: A Decade of Progress.Arnold I. Goldberg (ed.) - 1994 - Routledge.
    The tenth volume in the Progress in Self Psychology series begins with four timely assessments of the selfobject concept, followed by a section of clinical papers that span the topics of homosexuality, alter ego countertransference, hypnosis, trauma, dream theory, and intersubjective approaches to conjoint therapy. Section III, "A Dialogue of Self Psychology," offers Merton Gill's astute appreciation of "Heinz Kohut's Self Psychology," followed by commentaries by Leider and Stolorow and Gill's reply. The concluding section offers Stolorow and Atwood's (...)
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  45. The Dialectical Theory of Progress: A Study of Juergen Habermas' Theory of Social Evolution.David Owen - 1997 - Dissertation, University of Illinois at Chicago
    Both the pragmatic logic of social critique and the idea of a critical social theory presuppose the possibility of distinguishing progressive from regressive forms of social change. Thus, a condition of adequacy of social critique in general, and of critical social theory in particular, is the theoretical capacity to identify progressive social change. I begin this study by showing that, since it incorporates a theory of social evolution, Habermas's conception of critical social theory satisfies this condition. ;Habermas's theory of social (...)
     
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  46. The Concept of Rights in Contemporary Human Rights Discourse.Christine Chwaszcza - 2010 - Ratio Juris 23 (3):333-364.
    In a variety of disciplines, there exists a consensus that human rights are individual claim rights that all human beings possess simply as a consequence of being human. That consensus seems to me to obscure the real character of the concept and hinder the progress of discussion. I contend that rather than thinking of human rights in the first instance as “claim rights” possessed by individuals, we should regard human rights as higher order norms that articulate standards of (...)
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  47.  10
    Art in Progress: A Philosophical Response to the End of the Avant-Garde.Maarten Doorman - 2003 - Amsterdam University Press.
    In this challenging essay, Maarten Doorman argues that in art, belief in progress is still relevant, if not essential. The radical freedoms of postmodernism, he claims, have had a crippling effect on art, leaving it in danger of becoming meaningless. Art can only acquire meaning through context the concept of progress, then, is ideal as the primary criterion for establishing that context. The history of art, in fact, can be seen as a process of constant accumulation, works (...)
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  48.  33
    The Open-Endedness of the Set Concept and the Semantics of Set Theory.A. Paseau - 2003 - Synthese 135 (3):379 - 399.
    Some philosophers have argued that the open-endedness of the set concept has revisionary consequences for the semantics and logic of set theory. I consider (several variants of) an argument for this claim, premissed on the view that quantification in mathematics cannot outrun our conceptual abilities. The argument urges a non-standard semantics for set theory that allegedly sanctions a non-classical logic. I show that the views about quantification the argument relies on turn out to sanction a classical semantics and logic (...)
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  49.  6
    The Open-Endedness of the Set Concept and the Semantics of Set Theory.A. Paseau - 2003 - Synthese 135 (3):379-399.
    Some philosophers have argued that the open-endedness of the set concept has revisionary consequences for the semantics and logic of set theory. I consider an argument for this claim, premissed on the view that quantification in mathematics cannot outrun our conceptual abilities. The argument urges a non-standard semantics for set theory that allegedly sanctions a non-classical logic. I show that the views about quantification the argument relies on turn out to sanction a classical semantics and logic after all. More (...)
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  50.  17
    The Evolution of a Scientific Concept.Glas Eduard - 1999 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 30 (1):37-58.
    A philosophically comprehended account is given of the genesis and evolution of the concept of protein. Characteristic of this development were not shifts in theory in response to new experimental data, but shifts in the range of questions that the available experimental resources were fit to cope with effectively. Apart from explanatory success with regard to its own range of questions, various other selecting factors acted on a conceptual variant, some stemming from a competing set of research questions, others (...)
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