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  1. Ms.Natasha Bailie - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Mathematics.
    The reception of Newton's Principia in 1687 led to the attempt of many European scholars to ‘mathematicise' their field of expertise. An important example of this ‘mathematicisation' lies in the work of Irish-Scottish philosopher Francis Hutcheson, a key figure in the Scottish Enlightenment. This essay aims to discuss the mathematical aspects of Hutcheson's work and its impact on British thought in the following centuries, providing a case in point for the importance of the interactions between mathematics and philosophy throughout time.
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  2. Bolzano’s Mathematical Infinite.Anna Bellomo & Guillaume Massas - forthcoming - Review of Symbolic Logic:1-80.
    Bernard Bolzano (1781-1848) is commonly thought to have attempted to develop a theory of size for infinite collections that follows the so-called part-whole principle, according to which the whole is always greater than any of its proper parts. In this paper, we develop a novel interpretation of Bolzano's mature theory of the infinite and show that, contrary to mainstream interpretations, it is best understood as a theory of infinite sums. Our formal results show that Bolzano's infinite sums can be equipped (...)
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  3. Ian Hacking, Why Is There Philosophy of Mathematics at All? [REVIEW]Max Harris Siegel - forthcoming - Mind 124.
  4. Mathematical Selves and the Shaping of Mathematical Modernism: Conflicting Epistemic Ideals in the Emergence of Enumerative Geometry.Nicolas Michel - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):68-92.
  5. Permanence as a Principle of Practice.Iulian D. Toader - 2021 - Historia Mathematica 54:77-94.
    The paper discusses Peano's defense and application of permanence as a principle of practice, and Hahn's further point that, even if it were a principle of logic, permanence would not eliminate all logical ambiguity. Dedicated to the memory of Mic Detlefsen.
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  6. From Practical to Pure Geometry and Back.Mario Bacelar Valente - 2020 - Revista Brasileira de História da Matemática 20 (39):13-33.
    The purpose of this work is to address the relation existing between ancient Greek practical geometry and ancient Greek pure geometry. In the first part of the work, we will consider practical and pure geometry and how pure geometry can be seen, in some respects, as arising from an idealization of practical geometry. From an analysis of relevant extant texts, we will make explicit the idealizations at play in pure geometry in relation to practical geometry, some of which are basically (...)
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  7. On Archimedes’ Statics.Mario Bacelar Valente - 2020 - Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 35 (2):235-242.
    Archimedes’ statics is considered as an example of ancient Greek applied mathematics; it is even seen as the beginning of mechanics. Wilbur Knorr made the case regarding this work, as other works by him or other mathematicians from ancient Greece, that it lacks references to the physical phenomena it is supposed to address. According to Knorr, this is understandable if we consider the propositions of the treatise in terms of purely mathematical elaborations suggested by quantitative aspects of the phenomena. In (...)
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  8. On the Correctness of Problem Solving in Ancient Mathematical Procedure Texts.Mario Bacelar Valente - 2020 - Revista de Humanidades de Valparaíso 16:169-189.
    It has been argued in relation to Old Babylonian mathematical procedure texts that their validity or correctness is self-evident. One “sees” that the procedure is correct without it having, or being accompanied by, any explicit arguments for the correctness of the procedure. Even when agreeing with this view, one might still ask about how is the correctness of a procedure articulated? In this work, we present an articulation of the correctness of ancient Egyptian and Old Babylonian mathematical procedure texts – (...)
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  9. Michael Brooks. The Quantum Astrologer’s Handbook: A History of the Renaissance Mathematics That Birthed Imaginary Numbers, Probability, and the New Physics of the Universe. 256 Pp. Melbourne/London: Scribe Publications, 2017. $26 (Cloth); ISBN 9781947534810. Paper and E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Howard G. Barth - 2020 - Isis 111 (4):874-875.
  10. From Flanders to Lisbon to the Mughal Empire: Hendrick Uwens and the Mathematical Backstage of a Jesuit Missionary’s Life.Nuno Castel-Branco - 2020 - Early Science and Medicine 25 (3):224-249.
    Hendrick Uwens was a Flemish-educated Jesuit who became a missionary to the Mughal Empire. Prior to embarking on his missionary work, he taught mixed mathematics in Lisbon in the early 1640s. Both in Europe and India, Uwens often insisted on portraying himself as a mathematician. Mathematics allowed him to be amongst the first teachers of certain aspects of Galileo’s physics and to promote a mechanical worldview – unusual ideas in early Jesuit circles. He also used mathematics to negotiate his missionary (...)
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  11. Proving Quadratic Reciprocity: Explanation, Disagreement, Transparency and Depth.William D'Alessandro - 2020 - Synthese:1-44.
    Gauss’s quadratic reciprocity theorem is among the most important results in the history of number theory. It’s also among the most mysterious: since its discovery in the late 18th century, mathematicians have regarded reciprocity as a deeply surprising fact in need of explanation. Intriguingly, though, there’s little agreement on how the theorem is best explained. Two quite different kinds of proof are most often praised as explanatory: an elementary argument that gives the theorem an intuitive geometric interpretation, due to Gauss (...)
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  12. Hermann Cohen’s Principle of the Infinitesimal Method: A Defense.Scott Edgar - 2020 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 10 (2):440-470.
    In Bertrand Russell's 1903 Principles of Mathematics, he offers an apparently devastating criticism of the neo-Kantian Hermann Cohen's Principle of the Infinitesimal Method and its History (PIM). Russell's criticism is motivated by his concern that Cohen's account of the foundations of calculus saddles mathematics with the paradoxes of the infinitesimal and continuum, and thus threatens the very idea of mathematical truth. This paper defends Cohen against that objection of Russell's, and argues that properly understood, Cohen's views of limits and infinitesimals (...)
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  13. Jacqueline Feke. Ptolemy’s Philosophy: Mathematics as a Way of Life. Xi + 234 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Princeton, N.J./Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2018. $39.50 (Cloth); ISBN 9780691179582. Paper and E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Matthieu Husson - 2020 - Isis 111 (4):866-867.
  14. From the Four-Color Theorem to a Generalizing “Four-Letter Theorem”: A Sketch for “Human Proof” and the Philosophical Interpretation.Vasil Penchev - 2020 - Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics eJournal (Elsevier: SSRN) 12 (21):1-10.
    The “four-color” theorem seems to be generalizable as follows. The four-letter alphabet is sufficient to encode unambiguously any set of well-orderings including a geographical map or the “map” of any logic and thus that of all logics or the DNA plan of any alive being. Then the corresponding maximally generalizing conjecture would state: anything in the universe or mind can be encoded unambiguously by four letters. That admits to be formulated as a “four-letter theorem”, and thus one can search for (...)
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  15. Who Wants to Be a Mathematician? [REVIEW]Christopher J. Phillips - 2020 - Isis 111 (4):845-848.
    David Lindsay Roberts. Republic of Numbers: Unexpected Stories of Mathematical Americans through History. ix + 244 pp., bibl., index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019. $29.95 (cloth); ISBN 9781421433080. E-book available. Julian Havil. Curves for the Mathematically Curious: An Anthology of the Unpredictable, Historical, Beautiful, and Romantic. xx + 259 pp., apps., refs., index. Princeton, N.J./Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2019. $29.95 (cloth); ISBN 9780691180052. E-book available. David S. Richeson. Tales of Impossibility: The Two-Thousand-Year Quest to Solve the Mathematical Problems of (...)
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  16. Essay on Machines in General (1786) Text, Translations and Commentaries. Lazare Carnot's Mechanics - Volume 1.Raffaele Pisano, Jennifer Coopersmith & Murray Peake - 2020 - Springer.
    This book offers insights relevant to modern history and epistemology of physics, mathematics and, indeed, to all the sciences and engineering disciplines emerging of 19th century. This research volume is the first of a set of three Springer books on Lazare Nicolas Marguérite Carnot’s (1753–1823) remarkable work: Essay on Machines in General (Essai sur les machines en général [1783] 1786). The other two forthcoming volumes are: Principes fondamentaux de l’équilibre et du mouvement (1803) and Géométrie de position (1803). Lazare Carnot (...)
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  17. The Axiom of Choice and the Road Paved by Sierpiński.Valérie Lynn Therrien - 2020 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 10 (2):504-523.
  18. Geometrical Objects and Figures in Practical, Pure, and Applied Geometry.Mario Bacelar Valente - 2020 - Disputatio. Philosophical Research Bulletin 9 (15):33-51.
    The purpose of this work is to address what notion of geometrical object and geometrical figure we have in different kinds of geometry: practical, pure, and applied. Also, we address the relation between geometrical objects and figures when this is possible, which is the case of pure and applied geometry. In practical geometry it turns out that there is no conception of geometrical object.
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  19. Euclid’s Kinds and (Their) Attributes.Benjamin Wilck - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (2):362-397.
    Relying upon a very close reading of all of the definitions given in Euclid’s Elements, I argue that this mathematical treatise contains a philosophical treatment of mathematical objects. Specifically, I show that Euclid draws elaborate metaphysical distinctions between substances and non-substantial attributes of substances, different kinds of substance, and different kinds of non-substance. While the general metaphysical theory adopted in the Elements resembles that of Aristotle in many respects, Euclid does not employ Aristotle’s terminology, or indeed, any philosophical terminology at (...)
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  20. The Idea of Continuity as Mathematical-Philosophical Invariant.Eldar Amirov - 2019 - “Metafizika” Journal 2 (8):p. 87-100.
    The concept of ‘ideas’ plays central role in philosophy. The genesis of the idea of continuity and its essential role in intellectual history have been analyzed in this research. The main question of this research is how the idea of continuity came to the human cognitive system. In this context, we analyzed the epistemological function of this idea. In intellectual history, the idea of continuity was first introduced by Leibniz. After him, this idea, as a paradigm, formed the base of (...)
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  21. Geometry of Motion: Some Elements of its Historical Development.Mario Bacelar Valente - 2019 - ArtefaCToS. Revista de Estudios de la Ciencia y la Tecnología 8 (2):4-26.
    in this paper we return to Marshall Clagett’s view about the existence of an ancient Greek geometry of motion. It can be read in two ways. As a basic presentation of ancient Greek geometry of motion, followed by some aspects of its further development in landmark works by Galileo and Newton. Conversely, it can be read as a basic presentation of aspects of Galileo’s and Newton’s mathematics that can be considered as developments of a geometry of motion that was first (...)
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  22. Exploring Predicativity.Laura Crosilla - 2018 - In Klaus Mainzer, Peter Schuster & Helmut Schwichtenberg (eds.), Proof and Computation. World Scientific. pp. 83-108.
    Prominent constructive theories of sets as Martin-Löf type theory and Aczel and Myhill constructive set theory, feature a distinctive form of constructivity: predicativity. This may be phrased as a constructibility requirement for sets, which ought to be finitely specifiable in terms of some uncontroversial initial “objects” and simple operations over them. Predicativity emerged at the beginning of the 20th century as a fundamental component of an influential analysis of the paradoxes by Poincaré and Russell. According to this analysis the paradoxes (...)
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  23. Lautman on Problems as the Conditions of Existence of Solutions.Simon B. Duffy - 2018 - Angelaki 23 (2):79-93.
    Albert Lautman (b. 1908–1944) was a philosopher of mathematics whose views on mathematical reality and on the philosophy of mathematics parted with the dominant tendencies of mathematical epistemology of the time. Lautman considered the role of philosophy, and of the philosopher, in relation to mathematics to be quite specific. He writes that: ‘in the development of mathematics, a reality is asserted that mathematical philosophy has as a function to recognize and describe’ (Lautman 2011, 87). He goes on to characterize this (...)
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  24. Karine Chemla, Renaud Chorlay, and David Rabouin, Eds. The Oxford Handbook of Generality in Mathematics and the Sciences. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. Xi+528. $150.00 ; $120.00. [REVIEW]Christophe Eckes - 2018 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 8 (1):214-217.
  25. Mathematics, Core of the Past and Hope of the Future.James Franklin - 2018 - In Catherine A. Runcie & David Brooks (eds.), Reclaiming Education: Renewing Schools and Universities in Contemporary Western Society. Sydney, Australia: Edwin H. Lowe Publishing. pp. 149-162.
    Mathematics has always been a core part of western education, from the medieval quadrivium to the large amount of arithmetic and algebra still compulsory in high schools. It is an essential part. Its commitment to exactitude and to rigid demonstration balances humanist subjects devoted to appreciation and rhetoric as well as giving the lie to postmodernist insinuations that all “truths” are subject to political negotiation. In recent decades, the character of mathematics has changed – or rather broadened: it has become (...)
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  26. Religion and Ideological Confrontations in Early Soviet Mathematics: The Case of P.A. Nekrasov.Dimitris Kilakos - 2018 - Almagest 9 (2):13-38.
    The influence of religious beliefs to several leading mathematicians in early Soviet years, especially among members of the Moscow Mathematical Society, had drawn the attention of militant Soviet marxists, as well as Soviet authorities. The issue has also drawn significant attention from scholars in the post-Soviet period. According to the currently prevailing interpretation, reported purges against Moscow mathematicians due to their religious inclination are the focal point of the relevant history. However, I maintain that historical data arguably offer reasons to (...)
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  27. A Road Map of Dedekind’s Theorem 66.Ansten Klev - 2018 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 8 (2):241-277.
    Richard Dedekind’s theorem 66 states that there exists an infinite set. Its proof invokes such apparently nonmathematical notions as the thought-world and the self. This article discusses the content and context of Dedekind’s proof. It is suggested that Dedekind took the notion of the thought-world from Hermann Lotze. The influence of Kant and Bernard Bolzano on the proof is also discussed, and the reception of the proof in the mathematical and philosophical literature is covered in detail.
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  28. The Oxford Handbook of Generality in Mathematics and the Sciences, Edited by Karine Chemla, Renaud Chorlay and David Rabouin, 2016.Vincenzo De Risi - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):399-403.
  29. Paul Erickson. The World the Game Theorists Made. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015. Pp. 384. $35.00.Philip Mirowski - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (1):160-163.
  30. Poincaré on the Foundations of Arithmetic and Geometry. Part 1: Against “Dependence-Hierarchy” Interpretations.Katherine Dunlop - 2016 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (2):274-308.
    The main goal of part 1 is to challenge the widely held view that Poincaré orders the sciences in a hierarchy of dependence, such that all others presuppose arithmetic. Commentators have suggested that the intuition that grounds the use of induction in arithmetic also underlies the conception of a continuum, that the consistency of geometrical axioms must be proved through arithmetical induction, and that arithmetical induction licenses the supposition that certain operations form a group. I criticize each of these readings. (...)
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  31. Review of Gabriele Lolli, Numeri. La creazione continua della matematica. [REVIEW]Longa Gianluca - 2016 - Lo Sguardo. Rivista di Filosofia 21 (II):377-380.
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  32. On the Role of Virtual Work in Levi-Civita’s Parallel Transport.Giuseppe Iurato & Giuseppe Ruta - 2016 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 70 (5):1-13 (provisional).
    The current literature on history of science reports that Levi-Civita’s parallel transport was motivated by his attempt to provide the covariant derivative of the absolute differential calculus with a geometrical interpretation (For instance, see Scholz in ''The intersection of history and mathematics'', Birkhäuser, Basel, pp 203-230, 1994, Sect. 4). Levi-Civita’s memoir on the subject was explicitly aimed at simplifying the geometrical computation of the curvature of a Riemannian manifold. In the present paper, we wish to point out the possible role (...)
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  33. Snezana Lawrence and Mark McCartney, Eds. Mathematicians and Their Gods: Interactions Between Mathematics and Religious Beliefs. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. Vi+298, Index. $44.95. [REVIEW]Madeline Muntersbjorn - 2016 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (2):333-336.
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  34. The Algebra Between History and Education. [REVIEW]Raffaele Pisano - 2016 - Metascience (2):1-5.
    ‘‘What Is Algebra?-Why This Book?’’ This is the amazing prelude to Taming the Unknown by Victor J. Katz, emeritus professor of mathematics at the University of the District of Columbia and Karen Hunger Parshall, professor of history of mathematics at the University of Virginia. This is an excellent book; its accurate historical and pedagogical purpose offers an accessible read for historians and mathematicians. [continue...].
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  35. A Newtonian Tale Details on Notes and Proofs in Geneva Edition of Newton's Principia.Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2016 - BSHM-Journal of the British Society for the History of Mathematics:1-19.
    Based on our research regarding the relationship between physics and mathematics in HPS, and recently on Geneva Edition of Newton's Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1739–42) by Thomas Le Seur (1703–70) and François Jacquier (1711–88), in this paper we present some aspects of such Edition: a combination of editorial features and scientific aims. The proof of Proposition XLIII is presented and commented as a case study.
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  36. Equi-Probability Prior to 1650.Rudolf Schüssler - 2016 - Early Science and Medicine 21 (1):54-74.
  37. A Life in Science, Philosophy, and the Public Domain: Three Biographies of PoincaréJeremy J. Gray. Henri Poincaré: A Scientific Biography. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2013. Pp. Xii+592. $35.00/£24.95 .Ferdinand Verhulst. Henri Poincaré: Impatient Genius. New York: Springer, 2012. Pp. Xi+260. $49.95 ; $39.95 .Jean-Marc Ginoux and Christian Gerini. 2012. Henri Poincaré: Une Biographie au Quotidien. Paris: Ellipses, 2012. Pp. Iv+298. €24.00 . [Henri Poincaré: A Biography Through the Daily Papers. Singapore: World Scientific, 2013. Pp. 260. $29.00 ; $22.00 .]. [REVIEW]David J. Stump - 2016 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (2):309-318.
  38. Alison Walsh. Relations Between Logic and Mathematics in the Work of Benjamin and Charles S. Peirce. Boston: Docent Press, 2012. ISBN 978-098370046-3 . Pp. X + 314. [REVIEW]Shigeyuki Atarashi - 2015 - Philosophia Mathematica 23 (1):148-152.
  39. On the Concepts of Function and Dependence.André Bazzoni - 2015 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 19 (1):01-15.
    This paper briefly traces the evolution of the function concept until its modern set theoretic definition, and then investigates its relationship to the pre-formal notion of variable dependence. I shall argue that the common association of pre-formal dependence with the modern function concept is misconceived, and that two different notions of dependence are actually involved in the classic and the modern viewpoints, namely effective and functional dependence. The former contains the latter, and seems to conform more to our pre-formal conception (...)
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  40. What Diagrams Argue in Late Imperial Chinese Combinatorial Texts.Andrea Bréard - 2015 - Early Science and Medicine 20 (3):241-264.
    Attitudes towards diagrammatic reasoning and visualization in mathematics were seldom spelled out in texts from pre-modern China, although illustrations figure prominently in mathematical literature since the eleventh century. Taking the sums of finite series and their combinatorial interpretation as a case study, this article investigates the epistemological function of illustrations from the eleventh to the nineteenth century that encode either the mathematical objects themselves or represent their related algorithms. It particularly focuses on the two illustrations given in Wang Lai’s Mathematical (...)
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  41. Galileo in Padua: Architecture, Fortifications, Mathematics and “Practical” Science.Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2015 - Lettera Matematica Pristem International 2 (4):209-222.
    During his stay in Padua ca. 1592–1610, Galileo Galilei (1564–1642) was a lecturer of mathematics at the University of Padua and a tutor to private students of military architecture and fortifications. He carried out these activities at the Academia degli Artisti. At the same time, and in relation to his teaching activities, he began to study the equilibrium of bodies and strength of materials, later better structured and completed in his Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences of 1638. This paper examines (...)
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  42. Fibonacci and the Abacus Schools in Italy. Mathematical Conceptual Streams - Education and its Changing Relationship with Society.Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2015 - Almagest 6 (2):126-164.
    In this paper we present the relations between mathematics and mathematics education in Italy between the 12th and the 16th century. Since the subject is extremely wide, we will focus on two case-studies to point out some relevant aspects of this phenomenon: 1) Fibonacci’s studies (12th-13th century); 2) Abacus schools. More particularly, Fibonacci, probably the greatest European mathematician of the Middle Ages, made the calculations with Hindu-Arabic digits widely spread in Europe; Abacus schools were also based on the teaching of (...)
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  43. On A.A. Markov’s Attitude Towards Brouwer’s Intuitionism.Ioannis M. Vandoulakis - 2015 - Philosophia Scientae 19:143-158.
    The paper examines Andrei A. Markov’s critical attitude towards L.E.J. Brouwer’s intuitionism, as is expressed in his endnotes to the Russian translation of Heyting’s Intuitionism, published in Moscow in 1965. It is argued that Markov’s algorithmic approach was shaped under the impact of the mathematical style and values prevailing in the Petersburg mathematical school, which is characterized by the proclaimed primacy of applications and the search for rigor and effective solutions.
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  44. The Interplay Between Mathematical Practices and Results.Mélissa Arneton, Amirouche Moktefi & Catherine Allamel-Raffin - 2014 - In Léna Soler, Sjoerd Zwart, Michael Lynch & Vincent Israel-Jost (eds.), Science After the Practice Turn in the Philosophy, History, and Social Studies of Science. New York - London: Routledge. pp. 269-276.
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  45. The Concept of “Character” in Dirichlet’s Theorem on Primes in an Arithmetic Progression.Jeremy Avigad & Rebecca Morris - 2014 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 68 (3):265-326.
    In 1837, Dirichlet proved that there are infinitely many primes in any arithmetic progression in which the terms do not all share a common factor. We survey implicit and explicit uses ofDirichlet characters in presentations of Dirichlet’s proof in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, with an eye toward understanding some of the pragmatic pressures that shaped the evolution of modern mathematical method.
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  46. History of Mathematics in Mathematics Teacher Education.Kathleen M. Clark - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 755-791.
    The purpose of this chapter is to provide a broad view of the state of the field of history of mathematics in education, with an emphasis on mathematics teacher education. First, an overview of arguments that advocate for the use of history in mathematics education and descriptions of the role that history of mathematics has played in mathematics teacher education in the United States and elsewhere is given. Next, the chapter details several examples of empirical studies that were conducted with (...)
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  47. Corcoran Reviews Boute’s 2013 Paper “How to Calculate Proofs”.John Corcoran - 2014 - MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS 14:444-555.
    Corcoran reviews Boute’s 2013 paper “How to calculate proofs”. -/- There are tricky aspects to classifying occurrences of variables: is an occurrence of ‘x’ free as in ‘x + 1’, is it bound as in ‘{x: x = 1}’, or is it orthographic as in ‘extra’? The trickiness is compounded failure to employ conventions to separate use of expressions from their mention. The variable occurrence is free in the term ‘x + 1’ but it is orthographic in that term’s quotes (...)
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  48. Second-Order Models of Students' Mathematics: Delving Into Possibilities.T. Dooley - 2014 - Constructivist Foundations 9 (3):346-348.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Constructivist Model Building: Empirical Examples From Mathematics Education” by Catherine Ulrich, Erik S. Tillema, Amy J. Hackenberg & Anderson Norton. Upshot: I look at the different possibilities offered by the trajectory of second-order models in mathematics education. It seems to me that although possibilities are extended as models become more elaborate, this is only the case if teacher/researchers remain cognisant of a radical constructivist perspective. I also suggest that broad-ranging research on the models affords (...)
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  49. History of Mathematics in Mathematics Education.Michael N. Fried - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 669-703.
    This paper surveys central justifications and approaches adopted by educators interested in incorporating history of mathematics into mathematics teaching and learning. This interest itself has historical roots and different historical manifestations; these roots are examined as well in the paper. The paper also asks what it means for history of mathematics to be treated as genuine historical knowledge rather than a tool for teaching other kinds of mathematical knowledge. If, however, history of mathematics is not subordinated to the ideas and (...)
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  50. On the Use of Primary Sources in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics.Uffe Thomas Jankvist - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 873-908.
    In this chapter, an attempt is made to illustrate why the study of primary original sources is, as often stated, rewarding and worth the effort, despite being extremely demanding for both teachers and students. This is done by discussing various reasons for as well as different approaches to using primary original sources in the teaching and learning of mathematics. A selection of these reasons and approaches will be illustrated through a number of examples from the literature on using original sources (...)
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