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Profile: David Cohen
Profile: Daniel Cohen (Colby College)
Profile: Daniel Cohen (Charles Sturt University)
Profile: Dror Cohen (Tel Aviv University)
Profile: Dee Cohen (University of Johannesburg)
Profile: Daniel Cohen
  1. Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Autism.Simon Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg & D. J. Cohen - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
     
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  2.  11
    Virtue, In Context.Daniel H. Cohen - 2013 - Informal Logic 33 (4):471-485.
    Virtue argumentation theory provides the best framework for accommodating the notion of an argument that is “fully satisfying” in a robust and integrated sense. The process of explicating the notion of fully satisfying arguments requires expanding the concept of arguers to include all of an argument’s participants, including judges, juries, and interested spectators. And that, in turn, requires expanding the concept of an argument itself to include its entire context.
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  3. Decision Theory for Agents with Incomplete Preferences.Adam Bales, Daniel Cohen & Toby Handfield - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (3):453-70.
    Orthodox decision theory gives no advice to agents who hold two goods to be incommensurate in value because such agents will have incomplete preferences. According to standard treatments, rationality requires complete preferences, so such agents are irrational. Experience shows, however, that incomplete preferences are ubiquitous in ordinary life. In this paper, we aim to do two things: (1) show that there is a good case for revising decision theory so as to allow it to apply non-vacuously to agents with incomplete (...)
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  4.  40
    Introduction: Virtues and Arguments.Andrew Aberdein & Daniel H. Cohen - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):339-343.
    It has been a decade since the phrase virtue argumentation was introduced, and while it would be an exaggeration to say that it burst onto the scene, it would be just as much of an understatement to say that it has gone unnoticed. Trying to strike the virtuous mean between the extremes of hyperbole and litotes, then, we can fairly characterize it as a way of thinking about arguments and argumentation that has steadily attracted more and more attention from argumentation (...)
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  5.  25
    Oppositionists and Group Norms: The Reciprocal Influence of Whistle-Blowers and Co-Workers. [REVIEW]David B. Greenberger, Marcia P. Miceli & Debra J. Cohen - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (7):527-542.
    Who blows the whistle — a loner or a well-liked team player? Which of them is more likely to lead a successful opposition to perceived organizational wrongdoing? The potential influence of co-worker pressures to conform on whistle-blowing activity or the likely effects of whistle-blowing on the group have not been addressed. This paper presents a preliminary model of whistle-blowing as an act of nonconformity. One implication is that the success of an opposition will depend on the characteristics of the whistle-blower (...)
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  6. Finking Frankfurt.Daniel Cohen & Toby Handfield - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (3):363--74.
    Michael Smith has resisted Harry Frankfurt's claim that moral responsibility does not require the ability to have done otherwise. He does this by claiming that, in Frankfurt cases, the ability to do otherwise is indeed present, but is a disposition that has been `finked' or masked by other factors. We suggest that, while Smith's account appears to work for some classic Frankfurt cases, it does not work for all. In particular, Smith cannot explain cases, such as the Willing Addict, where (...)
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  7. Rational Capacities, Resolve, and Weakness of Will.Daniel Cohen & Toby Handfield - 2010 - Mind 119 (476):907 - 932.
    In this paper we present an account of practical rationality and weakness of will in terms of rational capacities. We show how our account rectifies various shortcomings in Michael Smith's related theory. In particular, our account is capable of accommodating cases of weak-willed behaviour that are not `akratic', or otherwise contrary to the agent's better judgement. Our account differs from Smith's primarily by incorporating resolve: a third rational capacity for resolute maintenance of one's intentions. We discuss further two ways to (...)
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  8. Understanding Other Minds Perspectives From Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience.Simon Baron-Cohen, Helen Tager-Flusberg & Donald J. Cohen - 2000
  9.  9
    Creating and Maintaining Ethical Work Climates.Deborah Vidaver Cohen - 1993 - Business Ethics Quarterly 3 (4):343-358.
    This paper examines how unethical behavior in the workplace occurs when management places inordinately strong emphasis on goalattainment without a corresponding emphasis on following legitimate procedures. Robert Merton's theory of sodal structure and anomie provides a foundation to discuss this argument. Key factors affecting ethical climates in work organizations are also addressed. Based on this analysis, the paper proposes strategies for developing and changing aspects of organizational culture to reduce anomie, thereby creating work climates which discourage unethical practices and provide (...)
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  10.  10
    Creating and Maintaining Ethical Work Climates: Anomie in the Workplace and Implications for Managing Change.Deborah Vidaver Cohen - 1993 - Business Ethics Quarterly 3 (4):343-358.
    This paper examines how unethical behavior in the workplace occurs when management places inordinately strong emphasis on goalattainment without a corresponding emphasis on following legitimate procedures. Robert Merton's theory of sodal structure and anomie provides a foundation to discuss this argument. Key factors affecting ethical climates in work organizations are also addressed. Based on this analysis, the paper proposes strategies for developing and changing aspects of organizational culture to reduce anomie, thereby creating work climates which discourage unethical practices and provide (...)
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  11. The American National Conversation About (Everything but) Shame.Dov Cohen - 2003 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 70 (4):1075-1108.
     
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  12.  11
    Arguments and Metaphors in Philosophy.Daniel Cohen - 2004 - University Press of America.
    In this book, Daniel Cohen explores the connections between arguments and metaphors, most pronounced in philosophy because philosophical discourse is both thoroughly metaphorical and replete with argumentation. Cohen covers the nature of arguments, their modes and structures, and the principles of their evaluation, and addresses the nature of metaphors, their place in language and thought, and their connections to arguments, identifying and reconciling arguments' and metaphors' respective roles in philosophy.
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  13. Essays on Free Will and Moral Responsibility.Nick Trakakis & Daniel Cohen (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
  14. Foucault on Sexuality in Greco-Roman Antiquity.David Cohen & Richard Saller - 1994 - In Jan Ellen Goldstein (ed.), Foucault and the Writing of History. Blackwell. pp. 35--59.
     
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  15.  23
    The Virtuous Troll: Argumentative Virtues in the Age of Argumentative Pluralism.Daniel H. Cohen - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (2):179-189.
    Technology has made argumentation rampant. We can argue whenever we want. With social media venues for every interest, we can also argue about whatever we want. To some extent, we can select our opponents and audiences to argue with whomever we want. And we can argue however we want, whether in carefully reasoned, article-length expositions, real-time exchanges, or 140-character polemics. The concepts of arguing, arguing well, and even being an arguer have evolved with this new multiplicity and diversity; theory needs (...)
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  16. Law, Sexuality, and Society the Enforcement of Morals in Classical Athens.David Cohen - 1991
     
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  17.  39
    Openness, Accidentality and Responsibility.Daniel Cohen - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 127 (3):581-597.
    In this paper, I present a novel argument for scepticism about moral responsibility. Unlike traditional arguments, this argument doesn’t depend on contingent empirical claims about the truth or falsity of causal determinism. Rather, it is argued that the conceptual conditions of responsibility are jointly incompatible. In short, when an agent is responsible for an action, it must be true both that the action was non-accidental, and that it was open to the agent not to perform that action. However, as I (...)
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  18.  18
    TArgument is War...And War is Hell: Philosophy, Education, and Metaphors for Argumentation.Daniel H. Cohen - 1995 - Informal Logic 17 (2).
    The claim that argumentation has no proper role in either philosophy or education, and especially not in philosophical education, flies in the face of both conventional wisdom and traditional pedagogy. There is, however, something to be said for it because it is really only provocative against a certain philosophical backdrop. Our understanding of the concept "argument" is both reflected by and molded by the specific metaphor that argument-is-war, something with winners and losers, offensive and defensive moments, and an essentially adversarial (...)
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  19. La muerte según Baruch Spinoza: aproximaciones a una noción problemática.Diana Cohen - 2001 - Dianoia 46 (46):41-64.
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  20.  28
    Resource Effects of Training General Practitioners in Risk Communication Skills and Shared Decision Making Competences.David Cohen, M. F. Longo, Kerenza Hood, Adrian Edwards & Glyn Elwyn - 2004 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (3):439-445.
  21.  54
    Creating the Best Possible World: Some Problems From Parfit.Daniel Cohen - 2009 - Sophia 48 (2):143-150.
    It is sometimes argued that if God were to exist, then the actual world would be the best possible world. However, given that the actual world is clearly not the best possible world, then God doesn’t exist. In response, some have argued that the world could always be improved with the creation of new people and that there is thus no best possible world. I argue that this reasoning gives rise to an instance of Parfit’s mere addition paradox and should (...)
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  22.  40
    What Boundaries Tell Us About Binding.Michael Kubovy & Dale J. Cohen - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (3):93-95.
  23.  18
    Argumentative Virtues as Conduits for Reason’s Causal Efficacy: Why the Practice of Giving Reasons Requires That We Practice Hearing Reasons.Daniel H. Cohen - forthcoming - Topoi:1-8.
    Psychological and neuroscientific data suggest that a great deal, perhaps even most, of our reasoning turns out to be rationalizing. The reasons we give for our positions are seldom either the real reasons or the effective causes of why we have those positions. We are not as rational as we like to think. A second, no less disheartening observation is that while we may be very effective when it comes to giving reasons, we are not that good at getting reasons. (...)
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  24.  13
    Understanding, Being, and Doing: Medical Ethics in Medical Education.Rosamond Rhodes & Devra S. Cohen - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (1):39-53.
    Over the past 15 years, medical schools have paid some attention to the importance of developing students' communication skills as part of their medical education. Over the past decade, medical ethics has been added to the curriculum of most U.S. medical schools, at least on paper. More recently, there has been growing discussion of the importance of professionalism in medical education. Yet, the nature and content of these fields and their relationship to one another remains confused and vague, and that (...)
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  25.  47
    A Reply to Cahn.Daniel H. Cohen - 1988 - Analysis 48 (2):109 - 110.
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  26.  9
    Virtue Epistemology and Argumentation Theory.Daniel H. Cohen - 2007 - In David Hitchcock (ed.), Dissensus and the search for common ground. OSSA.
    Virtue epistemology was modeled on virtue ethics theories to transfer their ethical insights to epistemology. VE has had great success: broadening our perspective, providing new answers to traditional questions, and raising exciting new questions. I offer a new argument for VE based on the concept of cognitive achievements, a broader notion than purely epistemic achievements. The argument is then extended to cognitive transformations, especially the cognitive transformations brought about by argumentation.
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  27.  30
    Un aggiornamento sulla ricerca con neuroimmagini nella ADHD.David Cohen & Jonathan Leo - 2004 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 25 (2):161-166.
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  28.  21
    Evaluating Arguments and Making Meta-Arguments.Daniel H. Cohen - 2001 - Informal Logic 21 (2).
    This paper explores the outlines of a framework for evaluating arguments. Among the factors to take into account are the strength of the arguers' inferences, the level of their engagement with objections raised by other interlocutors, and their effectiveness in rationally persuading their target audiences. Some connections among these can be understood only in the context of meta-argumentation and meta-rationality. The Principle of Meta-Rationality (PMR)--that reasoning rationally includes reasoning about rationality-is used to explain why it can be rational to resist (...)
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  29. An Introduction to Hilbert Space and Quantum Logic.David W. Cohen - 1989
     
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  30. Introduction.Nick Trakakis & D. Cohen - unknown
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  31.  9
    War, Moderation, and Revenge in Thucydides.David Cohen - 2006 - Journal of Military Ethics 5 (4):270-289.
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  32.  4
    Arguments That Backfire.Daniel H. Cohen - 2005 - In D. Hitchcock & D. Farr (eds.), The Uses of Argument. OSSA. pp. 58-65.
    One result of successful argumentation – able arguers presenting cogent arguments to competent audiences – is a transfer of credibility from premises to conclusions. From a purely logical perspective, neither dubious premises nor fallacious inference should lower the credibility of the target conclusion. Nevertheless, some arguments do backfire this way. Dialectical and rhetorical considerations come into play. Three inter-related conclusions emerge from a catalogue of hapless arguers and backfiring arguments. First, there are advantages to paying attention to arguers and their (...)
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  33.  20
    What Virtue Argumentation Theory Misses: The Case of Compathetic Argumentation.Daniel H. Cohen & George Miller - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):451-460.
    While deductive validity provides the limiting upper bound for evaluating the strength and quality of inferences, by itself it is an inadequate tool for evaluating arguments, arguing, and argumentation. Similar remarks can be made about rhetorical success and dialectical closure. Then what would count as ideal argumentation? In this paper we introduce the concept of cognitive compathy to point in the direction of one way to answer that question. It is a feature of our argumentation rather than my argument or (...)
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  34.  22
    A New Axiomatization of Belnap's Conditional Assertion.Daniel H. Cohen - 1986 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 27 (1):124-132.
  35.  11
    Responsibility From the Margins, by David Shoemaker.Daniel Cohen - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (4):840-841.
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  36.  19
    Putting Paradoxes to Pedagogical Use in Philosophy.Daniel H. Cohen - 1985 - Teaching Philosophy 8 (4):309-317.
  37.  8
    Argument is War... And War is Hell: Philosophy, Education, and Metaphors for Argumentation.Daniel H. Cohen - 1995 - Informal Logic 17 (2):177-188.
    The claim that argumentation has no proper role in either philosophy or education, and especially not in philosophical education, flies in the face of both conventional wisdom and traditional pedagogy. There is, however, something to be said for it because it is really only provocative against a certain philosophical backdrop. Our understanding of the concept "argument" is both reflected by and molded by the specific metaphor that argument-is-war, something with winners and losers, offensive and defensive moments, and an essentially adversarial (...)
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  38.  1
    Theft in Athenian Law.Michael Gagarin & D. Cohen - 1985 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 105:214.
  39.  20
    Putnam, Truth and Informal Logic.Jeffrey L. Kasser & Daniel Cohen - 2002 - Philosophica 70:85-108.
  40. Directionality and Complexity in Music.Dalia Cohen - 1995 - In M. G. Boroda (ed.), Units, Text and Language: An Interdisciplinary Approach. Universitätsverlag Dr. N. Brockmeyer.
     
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  41. The Politics of Schizophrenia: Oppression in the United States. [REVIEW]David Cohen - 1986 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 7 (1).
  42.  12
    Women In Athenian Art. [REVIEW]David Cohen - 2003 - The Classical Review 53 (2):450-452.
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  43.  49
    The Hate That Dare Not Speak its Name: Pornography Qua Semi-Political Speech. [REVIEW]Daniel I. A. Cohen - 1994 - Law and Philosophy 13 (2):195 - 239.
    In this essay we shall examine the contemporary jurisprudential thinking and legal precedents surrounding the issue of the sanctionability of pornography. We shall catalogue them by their logical presumptions, such as whether they view pornography as speech or act, whether they view pornography as obscenity, political hate-speech or anomalous other, whether they would scrutinize legislation governing pornography by a balancing of the harm of repression against the harm of permission, and who exactly they view as the victims.We shall take a (...)
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  44.  45
    Why a Victim's Age is Irrelevant When Assessing the Wrongness of Killing.Daniel Cohen & Morgan Luck - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):396-401.
    abstract Intuitively, all killings are equally wrong, no matter how old one's victim. In this paper we defend this claim — The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis — against a challenge presented by Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen. Lippert-Rasmussen shows The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis to be incompatible with two further theses: The Unequal Wrongness of Renderings Unconscious Thesis and The Equivalence Thesis. Lippert-Rasmussen argues that, of the three, The Equal Wrongness of Killings Thesis is the least defensible. He suggests that the (...)
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  45.  14
    Altered Processing of Health Threat Words as a Function of Hypochondriacal Tendencies and Experimentally Manipulated Control Beliefs.Len Lecci & Dale Cohen - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (1):211-224.
  46. Computability and Logic.Daniel E. Cohen - 1987 - Halsted Press.
  47.  12
    Providing or Hiding Information: On the Evolution of Amplifiers and Attenuators of Perceived Quality Differences.Oren Hasson, Dan Cohen & Avi Shmida - 1992 - Acta Biotheoretica 40 (4):269-283.
    In many coevolutionary systems members of one party select members of a second party based on quality differences existing among members of the latter (e.g., predators and prey, pollinators and flowers, etc.). We examined the fate of characters that increase (amplifiers) or decrease (attenuators) the perceived amplitude of differences in the quality upon which choice of the selecting party is based. We found that the evolution of such characters depends on (i) the relationship between the cost of the character and (...)
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  48.  15
    The End of Keynesianism.Daniel Cohen - 1985 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (63):139-147.
    Are Keynesian policies doomed? The experience of both Chirac and Mauroy might make one think so. Yet too severe a judgment would overlook an important counter-example: the actual economic recovery in the United States. As happened under the Kennedy-Johnson administration 20 years ago, the United States is experiencing a recovery that follows the textbook precepts of Keynesianism: an increase in military spending and a decrease in taxes, all of which is accompanied by (as predicted by the theory) an increase in (...)
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  49.  14
    An Update on ADHD Neuroimaging Research.David Cohen & Jonathan Leo - 2004 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 25 (2):161-166.
    Since the publication of a critical review on ADHD neuroimaging in a past issue of this journal , several relevant studies have appeared, including one study that had a subgroup of unmedicated ADHD children . In this update to our earlier review we comment on this last study’s failure to report on the crucial comparison between unmedicated and medicated ADHD subjects. The issue of prior medication exposure in ADHD subjects constitutes a serious confound in this body of research, and still (...)
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  50.  37
    Production of Supernatural Beliefs During Cotard's Syndrome, a Rare Psychotic Depression.David Cohen & Angèle Consoli - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):468-470.
    Cotard's syndrome is a psychotic condition that includes delusion of a supernatural nature. Based on insights from recovered patients who were convinced of being immortal, we can (1) distinguish biographical experiences from cultural and evolutionary backgrounds; (2) show that cultural significance dominates biographical experiences; and (3) support Bering's view of a cognitive system dedicated to forming illusory representations of immortality.
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