101 found
Order:
See also
David Schmidtz
University of Arizona
  1. Nonideal Theory: What It Is and What It Needs to Be.David Schmidtz - 2011 - Ethics 121 (4):772-796.
  2.  58
    Elements of Justice.David Schmidtz - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is justice? Questions of justice are questions about what people are due, but what that means in practice depends on context. Depending on context, the formal question of what people are due is answered by principles of desert, reciprocity, equality, or need. Justice, thus, is a constellation of elements that exhibit a degree of integration and unity, but the integrity of justice is limited, in a way that is akin to the integrity of a neighborhood rather than that of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  3.  94
    Sociality and Responsibility: New Essays in Plural Subject Theory.David Schmidtz - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):756-759.
  4.  14
    Value in Ethics and Economics.David Schmidtz - 1993 - Ethics 105 (3):662-663.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  5.  6
    A Realistic Political Ideal.David Schmidtz - 2016 - Social Philosophy and Policy 33 (1-2):1-10.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6. Respect for Everything.David Schmidtz - 2011 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):127 - 138.
    Species egalitarianism is the view that all living things have equal moral standing. To have moral standing is, at a minimum, to command respect, to be more than a mere thing. Is there reason to believe that all living things have moral standing in even this most minimal sense? If so?that is, if all living things command respect?is there reason to believe they all command equal respect?1 I explain why members of other species command our respect but also why they (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  7.  46
    The Cement of Society: A Study of Social Order.David Schmidtz - 1991 - Ethics 101 (3):653-655.
  8.  74
    Islands in a Sea of Obligation: Limits of the Duty to Rescue. [REVIEW]David Schmidtz - 2000 - Law and Philosophy 19 (6):683-705.
  9.  80
    Choosing Ends.David Schmidtz - 1994 - Ethics 104 (2):226-251.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  10. How to Deserve.David Schmidtz - 2002 - Political Theory 30 (6):774-799.
    People ought to get what they deserve. And what we deserve can depend on effort, performance, or on excelling in competition, even when excellence is partly a function of our natural gifts. Or so most people believe. Philosophers sometimes say otherwise. At least since Karl Marx complained about capitalist society extracting surplus value from workers, thereby failing to give workers what they deserve, classical liberal philosophers have worried that to treat justice as a matter of what people deserve is to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  11. Environmental Ethics: What Really Matters, What Really Works.David Schmidtz - 2002 - Oup Usa.
    This anthology collects 64 accessible classic and contemporary works that fall into the two main categories of research in environmental ethics. The material in the first section of the volume explores the nature of morality from an environmental perspective. It asks is the value of a human being fundamentally different from the kind of value we find elsewhere in nature? What is the role of consumer goods in life? What really matters? The second section explores the current state of our (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  12.  35
    Person, Polis, Planet: Essays in Applied Philosophy.David Schmidtz - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects thirteen of David Schmidtz's essays on the question of what it takes to live a good life, given that we live in a social and natural world. Part One defends a non-maximizing conception of rational choice, explains how even ultimate goals can be rationally chosen, defends the rationality of concern and regard for others (even to the point of being willing to die for a cause), and explains why decision theory is necessarily incomplete as a tool for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13. Justifying the State.David Schmidtz - 1990 - Ethics 101 (1):89-102.
  14. Property and Justice.David Schmidtz - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):79-100.
    When we’re trying to articulate principles of justice that we have reason to take seriously in a world like ours, one way to start is with an understanding of what our world is like, and of which institutional frameworks promote our thriving in communities and which do not. If we start this way, we can sort out alleged principles of justice by asking which ones license mutual expectations that promote our thriving and which ones do otherwise. This is an essay (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15. Are All Species Equal?David Schmidtz - 1998 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):57–67.
  16. Satisficing as a Humanly Rational Strategy.David Schmidtz - 2004 - In Michael Byron (ed.), Satisficing and Maximizing: Moral Theorists on Practical Reason. Cambridge University Press. pp. 30--59.
  17.  48
    Brief History of Liberty.David Schmidtz & Jason Brennan - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Stimulating and thought-provoking," A Brief History of Liberty" offers readers a philosophically-informed portrait of the elusive nature of one of our most ...
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18.  40
    Environmental Virtue Ethics: What It Is and What It Needs to Be.Matt Zwolinski & David Schmidtz - 2013 - In Daniel Russell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Virtue Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 221.
  19. The Institution of Property.David Schmidtz - 1994 - Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (2):42-62.
    The typical method of acquiring a property right involves transfer from a previous owner. But sooner or later, that chain of transfers traces back to the beginning. That is why we have a philosophical problem. How does a thing legitimately become a piece of property for the first time ? In this essay, I follow the custom of distinguishing between mere liberties and full-blooded rights. If I have the liberty of doing X , then it is permissible for me to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  20.  45
    A Place for Cost-Benefit Analysis.David Schmidtz - 2001 - Philosophical Issues 11 (1):148-171.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  21.  91
    What We Deserve, and How We Reciprocate.David Schmidtz - 2005 - Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):435-464.
    Samuel Scheffler says, “none of the most prominent contemporary versions of philosophical liberalism assigns a significant role to desert at the level of fundamental principle.” To the extent that this is true, the most prominent contemporary versions of philosophical liberalism are mistaken. In particular, there is an aspect of what we do to make ourselves deserving that, although it has not been discussed in the literature, plays a central role in everyday moral life, and for good reason. As with desert, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22. The Routledge Handbook of Libertarianism.Jason F. Brennan, Bas van der Vossen & David Schmidtz (eds.) - 2017 - Routledge.
    Libertarians often bill their theory as an alternative to both the traditional Left and Right. _The Routledge Handbook of Libertarianism_ helps readers fully examine this alternative, without preaching it to them, exploring the contours of libertarian thinking on justice, institutions, interpersonal ethics, government, and political economy. The 31 chapters--all written specifically for this volume--are organized into five parts. Part I asks, what should libertarianism learn from other theories of justice, and what should defenders of other theories of justice learn from (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. The Meanings of Life.David Schmidtz - 2002 - In Robert Nozick. Cambridge University Press.
    I remember being a child, wondering where I would be—wondering who I would be—when the year 2000 arrived. I hoped I would live that long. I hoped I would be in reasonable health. I would not have guessed I would have a white collar job, or that I would live in the United States. I would have laughed if you had told me the new millennium would find me giving a public lecture on the meaning of life. But that is (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  24. A Place for Cost-Benefit Analysis.David Schmidtz - 2001 - Noûs 35 (s1):148 - 171.
    What next? We are forever making decisions. Typically, when unsure, we try to identify, then compare, our options. We weigh pros and cons. Occasionally, we make the weighing explicit, listing pros and cons and assigning numerical weights. What could be wrong with that? In fact, things sometimes go terribly wrong. This paper considers what cost-benefit analysis can do, and also what it cannot.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25.  77
    When is Original Appropriation Required?David Schmidtz - 1990 - The Monist 73 (4):504-518.
  26. The Elements of Justice.David Schmidtz - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is justice? Questions of justice are questions about what people are due. However, what that means in practice depends on the context in which the question is raised. Depending on context, the formal question of what people are due is answered by principles of desert, reciprocity, equality, or need. Justice, therefore, is a constellation of elements that exhibit a degree of integration and unity. Nonetheless, the integrity of justice is limited, in a way that is akin to the integrity (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27.  66
    Self-Interest: What's in It for Me?*: David Schmidtz.David Schmidtz - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):107-121.
    We have taken the “why be moral?” question so seriously for so long. It suggests that we lack faith in the rationality of morality. The relative infrequency with which we ask “why be prudent?” suggests that we have no corresponding lack of faith in the rationality of prudence. Indeed, we have so much faith in the rationality of prudence that to question it by asking “why be prudent?” sounds like a joke. Nevertheless, our reasons and motives to be prudent are (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  28.  49
    The Myth of Property: Toward an Egalitarian Theory of Ownership.David Schmidtz - 1995 - Ethics 106 (1):200-202.
  29. 10. Laurence Thomas, The Family and the Political Self Laurence Thomas, The Family and the Political Self (Pp. 580-585).Richard J. Arneson, Robert E. Goodin, David Schmidtz, Agnieszka Jaworska, Caspar Hare & Lionel K. McPherson - 2007 - In Laurie DiMauro (ed.), Ethics. Greenhaven Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30.  22
    The Virtues of Justice1.David Schmidtz & John Thrasher - 2014 - In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press. pp. 59.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Property.David Schmidtz - 2011 - In George Klosko (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  32.  36
    What Nozick Did for Decision Theory.David Schmidtz & Sarah Wright - 2008 - In Person, Polis, Planet: Essays in Applied Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 282-294.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33.  49
    Guarantees.David Schmidtz - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (2):1.
    People have accidents. They get old. They eat too much. They have bad luck. And sooner or later, something will be fatal. It would be a better world if such things did not happen, but they do. There is no use arguing about it. What is worth arguing about is whether it makes for a better world when people have to pay for other people's misfortunes and mistakes rather than their own.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34.  54
    Diminishing Marginal Utility and Egalitarian Redistribution.David Schmidtz - 2000 - Journal of Value Inquiry 34 (2/3):263-272.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35.  51
    Reasons for Altruism.David Schmidtz - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):52-68.
    This essay considers whether acts of altruism can be rational. Rational choice, according to the standard instrumentalist model, consists of maximizing one's utility, or more precisely, maximizing one's utility subject to a budget constraint. We seek the point of highest utility lying within our limited means. The term ‘utility’ could mean a number of different things, but in recent times utility has usually been interpreted as preference satisfaction . To have a preference is to care , to want one alternative (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36. Social Welfare and Individual Responsibility.David Schmidtz & Robert E. Goodin - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    The issue of social welfare and individual responsibility has become a topic of international public debate in recent years as politicians around the world now question the legitimacy of state-funded welfare systems. David Schmidtz and Robert Goodin debate the ethical merits of individual versus collective responsibility for welfare. David Schmidtz argues that social welfare policy should prepare people for responsible adulthood rather than try to make that unnecessary. Robert Goodin argues against the individualization of welfare policy and expounds the virtues (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  74
    Virtue Ethics and Repugnant Conclusions.Matt Zwolinski & David Schmidtz - 2005 - In R. Sandler & P. Cafaro (eds.), Environmental Virtue Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 107--17.
    Both utilitarian and deontological moral theories locate the source of our moral beliefs in the wrong sorts of considerations. One way this failure manifests itself, we argue, is in the ways these theories analyze the proper human relationship toward the non-human environment. Another, more notorious, manifestation of this failure is found in Derek Parfit's Repugnant Conclusion. Our goal is to explore the connection between these two failures, and to suggest that they are failures of act-centered moral theories in general. As (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions.Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better if we were immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Life, Death, and Meaning brings together key readings, primarily by English-speaking philosophers, on such 'big questions.'.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  12
    An Anatomy of Corruption.David Schmidtz - 2018 - Social Philosophy and Policy 35 (2):1-11.
    Which social arrangements have a history of fostering progress and prosperity? One quick answer, falsely attributed to Adam Smith, holds that we are guided as if by an invisible hand to do what builds the wealth of nations. A more sober answer, closer to what Smith said and believed, is thatifthe right framework of rules—plus decent officiating—steers us away from buying and selling monopoly privilege and steers us toward being valuable to the people around us, we indeed will be part (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  70
    Natural Enemies: An Anatomy of Environmental Conflict.David Schmidtz - 2000 - Environmental Ethics 22 (4):397-408.
    Sometimes people act contrary to environmentalist values because they reject those values. This is one kind of conflict: conflict in values. There is another kind of conflict in which people act contrary to environmentalist values even though they embrace those values: because they cannot afford to act in accordance with them. Conflict in priorities occurs not because people’s values are in conflict, but rather because people’s immediate needs are in conflict. Conflict in priorities is not only an environmental conflict, but (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41. Reinventing the Commons: An African Case Study.David Schmidtz - manuscript
    A. From Private Ranchers................................................................ 205 B. From Kruger Park........................................................................ 207.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  37
    When Preservationism Doesn't Preserve.David Schmidtz - 1997 - Environmental Values 6 (3):327 - 339.
    According to conservationism, scarce and precious resources should be conserved and used wisely. According to preservation ethics, we should not think of wilderness as merely a resource. Wilderness commands reverence in a way mere resources do not. Each philosophy, I argue, can fail by its own lights, because trying to put the principles of conservationism or preservationism into institutional practice can have results that are the opposite of what the respective philosophies tell us we ought to be trying to achieve. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  24
    The Rejection of Consequentialism.David Schmidtz - 1990 - Noûs 24 (4):622.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  42
    Market Failure.David Schmidtz - 1993 - Critical Review 7 (4):525-537.
    The Theory of Market Failure explores how markets respond, both in theory and in practice, to public?goods and externality problems. Most of the articles in this anthology find that markets often meet the demand for public goods in a variety of cases where existing theory would lead one to expect market failure. Moreover, upon reflection, existing theory reveals itself to be in need of supplementation by a more realistic picture of how flexible markets (and evolving systems of property rights) respond (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45. Separateness, Suffering, and Moral Theory.David Schmidtz - manuscript
    I shall argue that the way people in relatively affluent countries react to a situation like that in Bengal cannot be justified; indeed, the whole way we look at moral issues—our moral conceptual scheme—needs to be altered, and with it, the way of life that has come to be taken for granted in our society.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  54
    Rationality Within Reason.David Schmidtz - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy 89 (9):445-466.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47.  83
    History and Pattern.David Schmidtz - 2005 - Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):148-177.
    This essay compares Rawls's and Nozick's theories of justice. Nozick thinks patterned principles of justice are false, and offers a historical alternative. Along the way, Nozick accepts Rawls's claim that the natural distribution of talent is morally arbitrary, but denies that there is any short step from this premise to any conclusion that the natural distribution is unjust. Nozick also agrees with Rawls on the core idea of natural rights liberalism: namely, that we are separate persons. However, Rawls and Nozick (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  12
    Friedrich Hayek.David Schmidtz - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  12
    Rationality Within Reason.David Schmidtz - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy 89 (9):445.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50. Book Review:Value in Ethics and Economics. Elizabeth Anderson. [REVIEW]David Schmidtz - 1995 - Ethics 105 (3):662-.
1 — 50 / 101