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James W. Heisig
Nanzan University
  1.  52
    Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
  2. Philosophers of Nothingness an Essay on the Kyoto School.James W. Heisig - 2001 - University of Hawaii Press.
     
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  3.  25
    Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, & the Question of Nationalism.James W. Heisig & John Maraldo (eds.) - 1995 - University of Hawai'i Press.
    Zen Buddhist Attitudes to War HIRATA Seiko IN ORDER FULLY TO UNDERSTAND the standpoint of Zen on the question of nationalism, one must first consider the ...
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  4.  20
    Rude Awakenings: Zen, the Kyoto School, and the Question of Nationalism.Steven Heine, James W. Heisig & John C. Maraldo - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (3):439.
  5.  6
    Nothing and Nowhere East and West: The Hint of a Common Ground.James W. Heisig - 2012 - Angelaki 17 (3):17-30.
  6.  55
    Non-I and Thou: Nishida, Buber, and the Moral Consequences of Self-Actualization.James W. Heisig - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (2):179-207.
    Ten years after Buber published his "I and Thou," the Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitarō published a book of the same title, knowing only Buber's name but nothing of his ideas. A comparison of these two works suggests certain fundamental differences between philosophies of being and philosophies of nothingness regarding the nature of human relationships. In particular, it points to the inherent tendency of the latter to remove moral responsibility and social consciousness to high but ineffective levels of abstraction.
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  7. Nishitani Keiji and the Overcoming of Modernity (1940–1945).James W. Heisig - 2009 - In Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 297-329.
     
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  8.  4
    Reviews: Defending Japan's Pacific War: The Kyoto School Philosophers and Post-White Power. [REVIEW]James W. Heisig - 2005 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 32:163-166.
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  9.  21
    Philosophy on a Bridge.James W. Heisig - 2016 - In . pp. 257-270.
    The author takes a quick look back at his philosophical education and academic interests through the lens of »comparative philosophy« and uncovers a progression of cross-cultural and cross-historical patterns at work, many of them unfolding tacitly beneath the surface. He concludes with a brief listing of five such patterns, culminating in an appeal for a recovery of unified world views shaped within particular traditions but set against the universal backdrop of a common care for the earth.
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  10. An Apology for Philosophical Transgressions.James W. Heisig - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:43-67.
    The essay that follows is, in substance, a lecture delivered in Brussels on 7 December 2016 to the 2nd International Conference of the European Network of Japanese Philosophy. In it I argue that the strategy of qualifying nothingness as an “absolute,” which was adopted by Kyoto School thinkers as a way to come to grips with fundamental problems of Western philosophy, is inherently ambiguous and ultimately weakens the notion of nothingness itself. In its place, a proposal is made to define (...)
     
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  11.  9
    The Religious Philosophy of the Kyoto School: An Overview.James W. Heisig - 1990 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 17 (1):51-81.
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  12.  20
    Tanabe Hajime and the Hint of A Dharmic Finality.James W. Heisig - 2011 - Comprendre 13 (2):55-69.
    The Japanese philosopher, Tanabe Hajime is taken up as an example of a thinker who, like the conference question, straddles intellectual histories East and West. Of all the Kyoto School philosophers, it was he who took history most seriously. He not only criticized Kantian, Hegelian, and Marxist notions of teleology and the modern scientific myth of "progress" on their own ground, but went on to counter these views of history with a logic of emptiness grounded in Buddhist philosophy. The essay (...)
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  13.  23
    Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies.James W. Heisig - 2005 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):235-235.
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  14.  8
    The Third Conference of the Tozai Shukyo Koryu Gakkai.James W. Heisig - 1986 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 6:97.
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  15.  16
    Book Review: Steffen Döll, Wozu also suchen? Zur Einführung in das Denken von Ueda Shizuteru. [REVIEW]James W. Heisig - 2006 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 33 (1):208-211.
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  16.  12
    The Heart of Buddhism: In Search of the Timeless Spirit of Primitive Buddhism.Takeuchi Yoshinori & James W. Heisig - 1985 - Philosophy East and West 35 (2):221-223.
  17.  13
    In Memoriam: Jan Van Bragt (1928–2007).James W. Heisig - 2008 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 28:141-144.
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  18.  13
    An Inquiry Into the Good and Nishida’s Missing Basho.James W. Heisig - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):237 - 251.
    In December 2010 Kyoto University hosted a symposium honoring the hundredth anniversary of the publication of Nishida Kitarō’s An Inquiry into the Good. The following is an English version of a talk delivered on that occasion. In it I have tried to argue against the widely held view that this maiden work contains the germ of Nishida’s mature philosophy, and at the same time to suggest that an early strain of ambiguity regarding the notion of the will points to a (...)
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  19. The Cultural Disarmament of Philosophy.James W. Heisig - 2008 - Universitas Philosophica 25 (50):17-40.
    This article protests against the claim that philosophy as such is universal, because it often ambiguously speaks more of a universality of cultural dominance than of a properly philosophical universality including other philosophical modes of language and thought in the commitment to a universal search for truth. It stresses the need of a deliberate decision to de- Westernizing the philosophical forum, and illustrates how the Kyoto School does seriously take up this challenge facing, among others, the heavy iron bars of (...)
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  20.  11
    The 2004 Meeting of the Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies.James W. Heisig - 2005 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 25 (1):153-153.
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  21. Theravada Buddhism: The View of the Elders.Asanga Tilakaratne, James W. Heisig, Timothy W. Richardson, Mee-Jeong Park, Sang-Suk Oh, Joowon Suh, Mary Shin Kim, Young-Mee Cho, Hyo-Sang Lee & Carol Schulz - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
     
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  22.  7
    Book Review: Early Buddhism and Christianity: A Comparative Study of the Founders' Authority, the Community, and the Discipline by Chai-Shin Yu. [REVIEW]James W. Heisig - 1982 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 9:320-322.
  23.  5
    Book Review: Robert Wilkinson, Nishida and Western Philosophy. [REVIEW]James W. Heisig - 2010 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37 (1):178-182.
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  24.  4
    Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies.James W. Heisig - 2003 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 23 (1):139-139.
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  25.  3
    Reviews: L'Oriente di Heidegger, Nichilismo e vacuità del Sé. A cura di Carlo Saviani. [REVIEW]James W. Heisig - 2003 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 30:159-162.
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  26.  2
    Reviews: Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, the Kyoto School, and Co-Prosperity. [REVIEW]James W. Heisig - 2005 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 32:178-180.
  27. Editors' Introduction.Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig - 2009 - In Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 1-€“12.
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  28. Editors' Introduction.James W. Heisig & Rein Raud - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 1-€“6.
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  29. Editors''' Introduction.James W. Heisig & Mayuko Uehara - 2008 - In James W. Heisig & Mayuko Uehara (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Origins and Possibilities. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 1-8.
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  30. Filosofi Del Nulla.James W. Heisig - 2017 - Chisokudo Publications.
    Traduzione italiana a cura di Enrico Fongaro, Carlo Saviani e Tiziano Tosolini. Il volume presenta il pensiero delle tre principali figure della cosiddetta “scuola di Kyoto”, Nishida Kitaro, Tanabe Hajime e Nishitani Keiji, mostrando come questa originale corrente del pensiero giapponese del Novecento costituisca per la filosofia tradizionale una sfida ad oltrepassare i suoi confini occidentali.
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  31. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6.James W. Heisig & Raquel Bouso (eds.) - 2009
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  32.  6
    Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad.James W. Heisig (ed.) - 2004 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
    The twelfth bi-annual symposium of the Nanzan Institute took up the problem of the philosophical tradition of Japan and how it has fared abroad. There were two principal foci of the meetings: the history and future prospects of the study and teaching of Japanese philosophy outside of Japan, and the preparation of a Sourcebook of Japanese Philosophy aimed at providing a solid anthology of Japanese philospohical resources from the earliest times up to the present. To address these two questions, 16 (...)
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  33.  3
    Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol. 1.James W. Heisig (ed.) - 2006 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
    Thirteen scholars gather together to discuss current issues in Japanese philosophy, critically examine its ongoing dialogue with Western philosophy, and open new questions for future research.
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  34.  14
    Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 3: Origins and Possibilities.James W. Heisig & Mayuko Uehara (eds.) - 2008 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
    he fourteen essays gathered together in this, the third volume of Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy, represent one more step in ongoing efforts to bring the concerns of twentieth-century Japanese philosophy into closer contact with philosophical traditions around the world. As its title indicates, the aims are twofold: to reflect critically on the work of leading figures in the modern academic philosophy of Japan and to straddle the borderlands where they touch on the work of their counterparts in the West. -/- (...)
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  35.  11
    Much Ado About Nothingness: Essays on Nishida and Tanabe.James W. Heisig - 2016 - Chisokudo Publications.
    Much Ado About Nothingness brings together 14 essays on Nishida Kitaro and Tanabe Hajime by one of the leading scholars of twentieth-century Japanese philosophy. With Nishida’s “logic of place” and Tanabe’s “logic of the specific” providing a continuity to the whole, the author writes from a conviction that “the overriding challenge for those doing philosophy in the key of the Kyoto School, with their sights set squarely on self-awareness like Nishida and Tanabe before them, is to turn its attention to (...)
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  36. Nothingness and Desire: A Philosophical Antiphony.James W. Heisig - 2017 - University of Hawaii Press.
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  37. Nothingness and Desire: A Philosophical Antiphony.James W. Heisig - 2017 - University of Hawaii Press.
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  38. Nishida’s Deodorized Basho and the Scent of Zeami’s Flower.James W. Heisig - 2010 - In James W. Heisig & Rein Raud (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 247-273.
  39. Predgovor bosanskom prijevodu.James W. Heisig - 2009 - In Nevad Kahteran & James W. Heisig (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 9-€“12.
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  40. Redefining Defining Philosophy: An Apology for a Sourcebook in Japanese Philosophy.James W. Heisig - 2004 - In Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Japanese Philosophy Abroad. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 340-354.
  41. The Religious Philosophy of Tanabe Hajime the Metanoetic Imperative.James W. Heisig, Taitetsu Unno & International Symposium on Metanoetics - 1990
  42.  7
    Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 6: Confluences and Cross-Currents.James W. Heisig Raquel Bouso & James W. Heisig (eds.) - 2009 - Nagoya: Nanzan.
    The list of publications having to do with Japanese intellectual history in general and Kyoto School philosophy in particular has grown steadily over the past years, both inside and outside of Japan. This is due in no small part to the important contributions made by those whose papers are included in this volume, the proceedings of an international conference held in June 2009 at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona. Although much remains to be done if Japanese philosophy is to (...)
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  43. Nishida Kitaro.Yamamoto Seisaku & James W. Heisig (eds.) - 1991 - University of California Press.
    In recent years several books by major figures in Japan's modern philosophical tradition have appeared in English, exciting readers by their explorations of the borderlands between philosophy and religion. What has been wanting, however, is a book in a Western language to elucidate the life and thought of Nishida Kitaro, Japan's first philosopher of world stature and the originator of what has come to be called the Kyoto School. No one is more qualified to write such a book than Nishitani (...)
     
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  44. Philosophy as Metanoetics.Yoshinori Takeuchi, Valdo Viglielmo & James W. Heisig (eds.) - 1990 - University of California Press.
    A milestone in Japan's post-war philosophical thought and a dramatic turning point in Tanabe's own philosophy, _Philosophy as Metanoetics_ calls for nothing less than a complete and radical rethinking of the philosophical task itself. It is a powerful, original work, showing vast erudition in all areas of both Eastern and Western thought.
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