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  1. Andrew Aberdein (2008). Logic for Dogs. In Steven D. Hales (ed.), What Philosophy Can Tell You About Your Dog. Open Court. 167-181.
    Imagine a dog tracing a scent to a crossroads, sniffing all but one of the exits, and then proceeding down the last without further examination. According to Sextus Empiricus, Chrysippus argued that the dog effectively employs disjunctive syllogism, concluding that since the quarry left no trace on the other paths, it must have taken the last. The story has been retold many times, with at least four different morals: (1) dogs use logic, so they are as clever as humans; (2) (...)
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  2. Michael Abraham, Dov M. Gabbay, Gabriel Hazut, Yosef E. Maruvka & Uri Schild (2011). Logical Analysis of the Talmudic Rules of General and Specific (Klalim-U-Pratim). History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (1):47-62.
    This article deals with a set-theoretic interpretation of the Talmudic rules of General and Specific, known as Klal and Prat (KP), Prat and Klal (PK), Klal and Prat and Klal (KPK) and Prat and Klal and Prat (PKP).
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  3. V. M. Abrusci, Ettore Casari & Massimo Mugnai (eds.) (1983). Atti Del Convegno Internazionale Di Storia Della Logica: San Gimignano, 4-8 Dicembre 1982. Clueb.
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  4. Irving H. Anellis (1992). Theology Against Logic: The Origins of Logic in Old Russia. History and Philosophy of Logic 13 (1):15-42.
    We consider the history of logic in pre-Petrine. Petrine. and immediate post-Pctrine Russia (from the 15th to the mid-18th centuries) and especially of the Petrine era from the late 17th to early 18th century. Throughout much of this time, the clergy evinced strong hostility towards logic. Nevertheless, a small number of academics and clerics such as Stefan Iavorskii and Fcofan Prokopovich kept Aristotelian logic alive during this period and provided the foundation for its development in the modern era.
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  5. Irving H. Anellis (1987). Mathematical Logic in the Soviet Union, 1917–1980. History and Philosophy of Logic 8 (1):71-76.
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  6. Ignacio Angelelli (1970). The Techniques of Disputation in the History of Logic. Journal of Philosophy 67 (20):800-815.
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  7. Ignacio Angelelli & María Cerezo (eds.) (1996). Studies on the History of Logic: Proceedings of the Iii. Symposium on the History of Logic. Walter De Gruyter.
  8. Ignazio Angelelli (1979). Die Logik der Neuzeit, by Wilhelm Risse. [REVIEW] International Logic Review 19:136-140.
  9. Stephen C. Angle (2012). The Discovery of Chinese Logic. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (3):293-296.
    History and Philosophy of Logic, Volume 33, Issue 3, Page 293-296, August 2012.
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  10. G. Aldo Antonelli (2004). Logic. In Luciano Floridi (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Blackwell.
    Logic is an ancient discipline that, ever since its inception some 2500 years ago, has been concerned with the analysis of patterns of valid reasoning. Aristotle first developed the theory of the syllogism (a valid argument form involving predicates and quantifiers), and later the Stoics singled out patterns of propositional argumentation (involving sentential connectives). The study of logic flourished in ancient times and during the middle ages, when logic was regarded, together with grammar and rhetoric (the other two disciplines of (...)
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  11. Antoine Arnauld (1996). Logic, or, the Art of Thinking: Containing, Besides Common Rules, Several New Observations Appropriate for Forming Judgment. Cambridge University Press.
    Antoine Arnauld and Pierre Nicole were philosophers and theologians associated with Port-Royal Abbey, a centre of the Catholic Jansenist movement in seventeenth-century France. Their enormously influential Logic or the Art of Thinking, which went through five editions in their lifetimes, treats topics in logic, language, theory of knowledge and metaphysics, and also articulates the response of 'heretical' Jansenist Catholicism to orthodox Catholic and Protestant views on grace, free will and the sacraments. In attempting to combine the categorical theory (...)
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  12. Jamin Asay (2012). Review of Truth, Reference and Realism. [REVIEW] International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 26 (3):345-348.
    International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Volume 26, Issue 3, Page 345-348, September 2012.
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  13. E. J. Ashworth (1974). Language and Logic in the Post-Medieval Period. Reidel.
    HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION Although many of the details of the development of logic in the Middle Ages remain to be filled in, it is well known that between ...
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  14. E. M. Barth (1982). From Axiom to Dialogue: A Philosophical Study of Logics and Argumentation. W. De Gruyter.
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  15. Valentin Bazhanov (2001). Restoration: S. A. Yanovskaya's Path in Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 22 (3):129-133.
    This article presents the story of S. A. Yanovskaya's epiphany?particularly, her shift from hard-line communist orthodoxy and hostility towards ?bourgeois minded? Soviet-Russian mathematicians to vigorous support of mathematical logic. In light of this evidence, S. A. Yanovskaya (1896?1966) may be considered as a spiritual leader and administrative founder of modern mathematical research and education in the USSR/Russia.
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  16. Arianna Betti & Willem R. de Jong (2010). Introduction. Synthese 174 (2):181-183.
  17. Arianna Betti, Willem R. de Jong & Marije Martijn (2011). The Axiomatic Method, the Order of Concepts and the Hierarchy of Sciences: An Introduction. Synthese 183 (1):1-5.
  18. Susanne Bobzien (2006). Logic, History Of: Ancient Logic. In Donald M. Borchert (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Thomson Gale.
    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive introduction to ancient (western) logic from earliest times to the 6th century CE, with a focus on issues that may be of interest to contemporary logicians and covering important topics in Post-Aristotelian logic that are frequently neglected (such as Peripatetic hypothetical syllogistic, the Stoic axiomatic system of propositional logic and various later ancient developments).
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  19. Susanne Bobzien (2006). Ancient Logic. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive introduction to ancient (western) logic from earliest times to the 6th century CE, with an emphasis on topics which may be of interest to contemporary logicians.
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  20. Józef M. Bocheński (1970). A History of Formal Logic. New York,Chelsea Pub. Co..
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  21. Józef M. Bocheński (1961). A History of Formal Logic. Notre Dame, Ind.,University of Notre Dame Press.
  22. Ivan Boh (1977). The ``Conditionatim''-Clause: One of the Problems of Existential Import in the History of Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 18 (3):459-466.
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  23. Tom Burke (2009). Browning on Inquiry Into Inquiry, Part 2. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (2):157--176.
    This is the second of two papers addressing Douglas Browning's "Designation, Characterization, and Theory in Dewey�s Logic" (2002) where he distinguishes a series of pretheoretical and theoretical stages for developing a theory of logic. The first paper recounts Browning's original version of these stages and the ramifications of not clearly distinguishing them. I respond to Browning's claim that in Burke 1994 I made two such mistakes of not properly distinguishing theoretical and pretheoretical stages of inquiry into inquiry. The second paper (...)
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  24. Tom Burke (1994). Dewey's New Logic: A Reply to Russell. University of Chicago Press.
    John Dewey is celebrated for his work in the philosophy of education and acknowledged as a leading proponent of American pragmatism. His philosophy of logic, on the other hand, is largely unheard of. In Dewey's New Logic, Burke analyzes portions of the debate between Dewey and Bertrand Russell that followed the 1938 publication of Dewey's Logic: The Theory of Inquiry. Burke shows how Russell failed to understand Dewey, and how Dewey's philosophy of logic is centrally relevant to contemporary developments in (...)
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  25. Hector-Neri Castañeda (1990). Leibniz's Complete Propositional Logic. Topoi 9 (1):15-28.
    I have shown (to my satisfaction) that Leibniz's final attempt at a generalized syllogistico-propositional calculus in the Generales Inquisitiones was pretty successful. The calculus includes the truth-table semantics for the propositional calculus. It contains an unorthodox view of conjunction. It offers a plethora of very important logical principles. These deserve to be called a set of fundamentals of logical form. Aside from some imprecisions and redundancies the system is a good systematization of propositional logic, its semantics, and a correct account (...)
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  26. Dalla Chiara & Maria Luisa (eds.) (1983). Logic in the 20th Century: A Series of Papers on the Present State and Tendencies of Studies. Scienta.
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  27. Thony Christie (1990). Nature as a Source in the History of Logic, 1870–1910. History and Philosophy of Logic 11 (1):1-3.
    By using examples drawn from the periodical Nature, I show that research into the history of logic in the nineteenth century involves journals and periodicals which are normally not considered as standard sources for logic or its history.
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  28. John Corcoran (2010). Review of Striker Translation of Aristotle's PRIOR ANALYTICS. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:1-13.
    This review places this translation and commentary on Book A of Prior Analytics in historical, logical, and philosophical perspective. In particular, it details the author’s positions on current controversies. The author of this translation and commentary is a prolific and respected scholar, a leading figure in a large and still rapidly growing area of scholarship: Prior Analytics studies PAS. PAS treats many aspects of Aristotle’s Prior Analytics: historical context, previous writings that influenced it, preservation and transmission of its manuscripts, editions (...)
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  29. John Corcoran (2009). Aristotle's Demonstrative Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 30 (1):1-20.
    Demonstrative logic, the study of demonstration as opposed to persuasion, is the subject of Aristotle's two-volume Analytics. Many examples are geometrical. Demonstration produces knowledge (of the truth of propositions). Persuasion merely produces opinion. Aristotle presented a general truth-and-consequence conception of demonstration meant to apply to all demonstrations. According to him, a demonstration, which normally proves a conclusion not previously known to be true, is an extended argumentation beginning with premises known to be truths and containing a chain of reasoning showing (...)
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  30. John Corcoran (2007). 2007. Notes on the Founding of Logics and Metalogic: Aristotle, Boole, and Tarski. Eds. C. Martínez Et Al. Current Topics in Logic and Analytic Philosophy / Temas Actuales de Lógica y Filosofía Analítica. Imprenta Univeridade Santiago de Compostela. In C. Martínez (ed.), Current Topics in Logic and Analytic Philosophy /. 145-178.
  31. John Corcoran (2006). Schemata: The Concept of Schema in the History of Logic. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (2):219-240.
    The syllogistic figures and moods can be taken to be argument schemata as can the rules of the Stoic propositional logic. Sentence schemata have been used in axiomatizations of logic only since the landmark 1927 von Neumann paper [31]. Modern philosophers know the role of schemata in explications of the semantic conception of truth through Tarski’s 1933 Convention T [42]. Mathematical logicians recognize the role of schemata in first-order number theory where Peano’s second-order Induction Axiom is approximated by Herbrand’s Induction-Axiom (...)
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  32. John Corcoran (2005). Wholistic Reference, Truth-Values, Universes of Discourse, and Formal Ontology: Tréplica to Oswaldo Chateaubriand. Manuscrito 28 (1).
    ABSTRACT: In its strongest unqualified form, the principle of wholistic reference is that in any given discourse, each proposition refers to the whole universe of that discourse, regardless of how limited the referents of its non-logical or content terms. According to this principle every proposition of number theory, even an equation such as "5 + 7 = 12", refers not only to the individual numbers that it happens to mention but to the whole universe of numbers. This principle, its history, (...)
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  33. John Corcoran (1994). The Founding of Logic. Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):9-24.
    Since the time of Aristotle's students, interpreters have considered Prior Analytics to be a treatise about deductive reasoning, more generally, about methods of determining the validity and invalidity of premise-conclusion arguments. People studied Prior Analytics in order to learn more about deductive reasoning and to improve their own reasoning skills. These interpreters understood Aristotle to be focusing on two epistemic processes: first, the process of establishing knowledge that a conclusion follows necessarily from a set of premises (that is, on the (...)
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  34. John Corcoran (1980). Categoricity. History and Philosophy of Logic 1 (1):187-207.
    After a short preface, the first of the three sections of this paper is devoted to historical and philosophic aspects of categoricity. The second section is a self-contained exposition, including detailed definitions, of a proof that every mathematical system whose domain is the closure of its set of distinguished individuals under its distinguished functions is categorically characterized by its induction principle together with its true atoms (atomic sentences and negations of atomic sentences). The third section deals with applications especially those (...)
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  35. John Corcoran (1973). Meanings of Implication. Dialogos 9 (1):59-76.
    Thirteen meanings of 'implication' are described and compared. Among them are relations that have been called: logical implication, material implication,deductive implication, formal implication, enthymemic implication, and factual implication. In a given context, implication is the homogeneous two-place relation expressed by the relation verb 'implies'. For heuristic and expository reasons this article skirts many crucial issues including use-mention, the nature of the entities that imply and are implied, and the processes by which knowledge of these relations are achieved. This paper is (...)
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  36. John Corcoran & José Miguel Sagüillo (2011). The Absence of Multiple Universes of Discourse in the 1936 Tarski Consequence-Definition Paper. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (4):359 - 374.
    This paper discusses the history of the confusion and controversies over whether the definition of consequence presented in the 11-page 1936 Tarski consequence-definition paper is based on a monistic fixed-universe framework?like Begriffsschrift and Principia Mathematica. Monistic fixed-universe frameworks, common in pre-WWII logic, keep the range of the individual variables fixed as the class of all individuals. The contrary alternative is that the definition is predicated on a pluralistic multiple-universe framework?like the 1931 Gödel incompleteness paper. A pluralistic multiple-universe framework recognizes multiple (...)
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  37. John Corcoran & Susan Wood (1980). Boole's Criteria for Validity and Invalidity. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 21 (4):609-638.
    It is one thing for a given proposition to follow or to not follow from a given set of propositions and it is quite another thing for it to be shown either that the given proposition follows or that it does not follow.* Using a formal deduction to show that a conclusion follows and using a countermodel to show that a conclusion does not follow are both traditional practices recognized by Aristotle and used down through the history of logic. These (...)
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  38. George Couvalis (2004). Is Induction Epistemologically Prior to Deduction? Ratio 17 (1):28–44.
    Most philosophers hold that the use of our deductive powers confers an especially strong warrant on some of our mathematical and logical beliefs. By contrast, many of the same philosophers hold that it is a matter of serious debate whether any inductive inferences are cogent. That is, they hold that we might well have no warrant for inductively licensed beliefs, such as generalizations. I argue that we cannot know that we know logical and mathemati- cal truths unless we use induction. (...)
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  39. Franca D'Agostini (2001). From a Continental Point of View: The Role of Logic in the Analytic-Continental Divide. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (3):349 – 367.
    My discussion addresses the differences between analytic and continental philosophy concerning the use of logic and exact reasoning in philosophical practice. These differences are mainly examined in the light of the controversial dominance of Hegel's concept of logic (and theory of concept) in twentieth-century continental philosophy. The inquiry is developed in two parts. In the first (Sections 1-2), I indicate some aspects of the analytic-continental divide, pointing to the role that the topic 'logic and philosophy' plays in it. (...)
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  40. Alfredo Di Giorgio & Daniele Chiffi (eds.) (2013). Prova e Giustificazione. G. Giappichelli Editore.
    I saggi che compongono questo libro intendono presentare in maniera organica e interdisciplinare, anche se da una prospettiva fondazionale logico-filosofica, il ruolo che il concetto di prova svolge in differenti ambiti del sapere. L’elemento innovativo e caratterizzante del volume è quello di stabilire e formulare quali sono le condizioni di adeguatezza materiale e formale per una corretta esplicazione del concetto di prova nelle sue differenti applicazioni. Si cercherà, inoltre, di cogliere cosa ha qualificato storicamente e qualifica tuttora il concetto di (...)
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  41. Burton Dreben & Juliet Floyd (1991). Tautology: How Not to Use a Word. Synthese 87 (1):23 - 49.
  42. C. J. Ducasse & Haskell B. Curry (1963). Addendum to Early History of the Association for Symbolic Logic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 28 (4):279.
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  43. C. J. Ducasse & Haskell B. Curry (1962). Early History of the Association for Symbolic Logic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 27 (3):255-258.
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  44. Anton Dumitriu (1977). History of Logic. Abacus Press.
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  45. Matti Eklund (1996). On How Logic Became First-Order. Nordic Journal of Philosophical Logic 1 (2):147-67.
    Added by a category editor--not an official abstract. -/- Discusses the history (and reasons for the history) implicit in the title, as well as the author's view on same.
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  46. James Van Evra (2000). The Development of Logic as Reflected in the Fate of the Syllogism 1600–1900. History and Philosophy of Logic 21 (2):115-134.
    One way to determine the quality and pace of change in a science as it undergoes a major transition is to follow some feature of it which remains relatively stable throughout the process. Following the chosen item as it goes through reinterpretation permits conclusions to be drawn about the nature and scope of the broader change in question. In what follows, this device is applied to the change which took place in logic in the mid-nineteenth century. The feature chosen as (...)
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  47. Danny Frederick (2014). Deduction and Novelty Again. The Reasoner 8 (5):51-52.
    It is commonly claimed that the conclusion of a valid deductive argument is contained in its premises and says nothing new. In 'Deduction and Novelty,' in The Reasoner 5 (4), pp. 56-57, I refuted that claim. In The Reasoner, 8 (3), pp. 24-25, David McBride criticised my refutation. I show that McBride’s arguments are unsound.
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  48. Danny Frederick (2011). P. F. Strawson on Predication. Polish Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):39-57.
    Strawson offers three accounts of singular predication: a grammatical, a category and a mediating account. I argue that the grammatical and mediating accounts are refuted by a host of counter-examples and that the latter is worse than useless. In later works Strawson defends only the category account. This account entails that singular terms cannot be predicates; it excludes non-denoting singular terms from being logical subjects, except by means of an ad hoc analogy; it depends upon a notion of identification that (...)
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  49. Dov M. Gabbay, John Woods & Akihiro Kanamori (eds.) (2004). Handbook of the History of Logic. Elsevier.
    Greek, Indian and Arabic Logic marks the initial appearance of the multi-volume Handbook of the History of Logic. Additional volumes will be published when ready, rather than in strict chronological order. Soon to appear are The Rise of Modern Logic: From Leibniz to Frege. Also in preparation are Logic From Russell to Gödel, The Emergence of Classical Logic, Logic and the Modalities in the Twentieth Century, and The Many-Valued and Non-Monotonic Turn in Logic. Further volumes will follow, including Mediaeval and (...)
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  50. Roland O. Gibson (1982). Logic as History of Science and Experience of Art. Heinemann Educational Books.
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