This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
32 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Bruce Adolphe (1999). Of Mozart, Parrots and Cherry Blossoms in the Wind: A Composer Explores Mysteries of the Musical Mind. Limelight Editions.
    The exhilarating mix of humor, philosophy, fact and whimsy that marks these essays derives from more than 200 lectures Bruce Adolphe has given over most of the ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Daniel Barenboim (2009). Music Quickens Time. Verso.
    In this eloquent book, Daniel Barenboim draws on his profound and uniquely influential engagement with music to argue for its central importance in our everyday lives.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Daniel Barenboim (2008). Everything is Connected: The Power of Music. Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Harris M. Berger (2009). Stance: Ideas About Emotion, Style, and Meaning for the Study of Expressive Culture. Wesleyan University Press.
    Locating stance -- Structures of stance in lived experience -- Stance and others, stance and lives -- The social life of stance and the politics of expressive culture.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Karol Berger, Anthony Newcomb & Reinhold Brinkmann (eds.) (2005). Music and the Aesthetics of Modernity: Essays. Distributed by Harvard University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Vincent Bergeron & Dominic Mciver Lopes (2009). Hearing and Seeing Musical Expression. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):1-16.
    Everybody assumes (1) that musical performances are sonic events and (2) that their expressive properties are sonic properties. This paper discusses recent findings in the psychology of music perception that show that visual information combines with auditory information in the perception of musical expression. The findings show at the very least that arguments are needed for (1) and (2). If music expresses what we think it does, then its expressive properties may be visual as well as sonic; and if its (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Paul A. Boghossian (2002). On Hearing the Music in the Sound: Scruton on Musical Expression. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (1):49–55.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Anoop Chandola (1988). Music as Speech: An Ethnomusicolinguistic Study of India. Navrang.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Tom Cochrane (2010). Music, Emotions and the Influence of the Cognitive Sciences. Philosophy Compass 5 (11):978-988.
    This article reviews some of the ways in which philosophical problems concerning music can be informed by approaches from the cognitive sciences (principally psychology and neuroscience). Focusing on the issues of musical expressiveness and the arousal of emotions by music, the key philosophical problems and their alternative solutions are outlined. There is room for optimism that while current experimental data does not always unambiguously satisfy philosophical scrutiny, it can potentially support one theory over another, and in some cases allow us (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Tom Cochrane (2010). A Simulation Theory of Musical Expressivity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):191-207.
    This paper examines the causal basis of our ability to attribute emotions to music, developing and synthesizing the existing arousal, resemblance and persona theories of musical expressivity to do so. The principal claim is that music hijacks the simulation mechanism of the brain, a mechanism which has evolved to detect one's own and other people's emotions.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Tom Cochrane (2010). Using the Persona to Express Complex Emotions in Music. Music Analysis 29 (1-3):264-275.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Tom Cochrane (2008). Expression and Extended Cognition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):59-73.
    I argue for the possibility of an extremely intimate connection between the emotional content of the music and the emotional state of the person who produces that music. Under certain specified conditions, the music may not just influence, but also partially constitute the musician’s emotional state.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. A. E. Denham (2009). The Future of Tonality. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):427-450.
    Is the tonal ordering of music, and the order of European triadic tonality in particular, the developed manifestation of an essential musical structure—a structure naturally suited to our human capacity to organize sounds musically? Historically and geographically, triadic tonality is a highly local phenomenon, limited to music beginning in the mid-seventeenth century and, until the nineteenth century, almost wholly confined to the Western European musical tradition. Some theorists accordingly regard tonality as a dispensable aesthetic convention—and one which, moreover, has had (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Krzysztof Guczalski (2005). Expressive Meaning in Music: Generality Versus Particularity. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):342-367.
    The dilemma referred to in the title occurs in many contexts concerned with expressive meaning in art, and especially music, which suggests that the issue it raises will be central to any complete theory of musical expressiveness. One notable attempt to resolve the paradox of simultaneous generality and particularity in music is in Aaron Ridley's book Music, Value and the Passions. I show why I consider his account unsatisfactory and then propose my own resolution of the paradox. It takes the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Eran Guter (2004). Wittgenstein on Musical Experience and Knowledge. In J. C. Marek & E. M. Reicher (eds.), Experience and Analysis, Contributions to the 27th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.
    Wittgenstein’s thinking on music is intimately linked to core issues in his work on the philosophy of psychology. I argue that inasmuch musical experience exemplifies the kind of grammatical complexity that is indigenous to aspect perception and, in general, to concepts that are based on physiognomy, it is rendered by Wittgenstein as a form of knowledge, namely, knowledge of mankind.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. V. A. Howard (1971). On Musical Expression. British Journal of Aesthetics 11 (3):268-280.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Gregory Karl & Jenefer Robinson (1995). Shostakovich's Tenth Symphony and the Musical Expression of Cognitively Complex Emotions. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (4):401-415.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Peter Kivy (1995). Stephen Davies: Musical Meaning and Expression. Mind 104 (416):896-900.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Peter Kivy (1990). Music Alone: Philosophical Reflections on the Purely Musical Experience. Cornell University Press.
    In the Essai sur Vorigine des langues (), Jean-Jacques Rousseau reports on an eighteenth-century curiosity that has, from time to time, fascinated musicians ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Catherine Legg (2002). Review of Naomi Cumming, "The Sonic Self: Musical Subjectivity and Signification&Quot;. [REVIEW] Recherches Semiotiques / Semiotic Inquiry 22 (1-2-3):315-327.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Justin London (2002). A Cohenian Approach to Musical Expression. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2):182-185.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Paul Noordhof (2008). Expressive Perception as Projective Imagining. Mind and Language 23 (3):329–358.
    I argue that our experience of expressive properties (such as the joyfulness or sadness of a piece of music) essentially involves the sensuous imagination (through simulation) of an emotion-guided process which would result in the production of the properties which constitute the realisation of the expressive properties experienced. I compare this proposal with arousal theories, Wollheim’s Freudian account, and other more closely related theories appealing to imagination such as Kendall Walton’s. I explain why the proposal is most naturally developed in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Aaron Ridley (2007). Musical Expression. Expression in Music / Derek Matravers ; Explaining Musical Experience / Paul Boghossian ; Persona Sometimes Grata : On the Appreciation of Expressive Music. In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Tiger C. Roholt (2010). Musical Musical Nuance. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):1-10.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Paul F. Snowdon (2009). Peacocke on Musical Experience and Hearing Metaphorically-As. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):277-281.
    Christopher Peacocke's paper presents a characteristically rich and original theory of the so-called expressive qualities of music. It is, surely, impossible to come to a verdict on such an interesting theory quickly, and it will, no doubt, attract continuing and merited attention. The purpose of my preliminary reflections is to raise some questions about the proposal and to express some reservations, but I see these remarks as simply opening and inconclusive ones in a longer dialogue. I am going to divide (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Erich Sorantin (1932). The Problem of Musical Expression. Nashville, Tenn.,Marshall & Bruce Co..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Robert Stecker (2001). Expressiveness and Expression in Music and Poetry. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (1):85-96.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Robert Stecker (1999). Davies on the Musical Expression of Emotion. British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (3):273-281.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Saam Trivedi (2001). Expressiveness as a Property of the Music Itself. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (4):411–420.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Rob van Gerwen (2008). Expression as Success. The Psychological Reality of Musical Performance. Estetika 45 (1):24-40.
    Roger Scruton’s ontology of sound is found wanting on two counts. Scruton removes from music the importance of the performer’s manipulating of his instrument. This misconceives the phenomenology of hearing and, as a consequence, impoverishes our understanding of music. I argue that the musician’s manipulations can be heard in the music; and, in a discussion of notions developed by Richard Wollheim and Jerrold Levinson, that these manipulations have psychological reality, and that it is this psychological reality which brings to life (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. James O. Young (2012). Resemblance, Convention, and Musical Expressiveness. The Monist 95 (4):587-605.
    Peter Kivy and Stephen Davies developed an influential and convincing account of what features of music cause listeners to hear it as expressive of emotion. Their view (the resemblance theory) holds that music is expressive of some emotion when it resembles human expressive behaviour. Some features of music, they believe, are expressive of emotion because of conventional associations. In recent years, Kivy has rejected the resemblance theory without adopting an alternative. This essay argues that Kivy has been unwise to abandon (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. James O. Young (1991). Key, Temperament and Musical Expression. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (3):235-242.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation