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  1. Daniel Albright (1981). Representation and the Imagination: Beckett, Kafka, Nabokov, and Schoenberg. University of Chicago Press.
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  2. Peter Alward (2006). Leave Me Out of It: De Re, but Not de Se, Imaginative Engagement with Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):451–459.
    I have been dissatisfied with Walton’s make-believe model of appreciator engagement with fiction ever since my first encounter with it as a graduate student.1 What I have always objected to is not the suggestion that such engagement is broadly speaking imaginative; rather, it is the suggestion that it specifically involves de se imaginative activity on the part of appreciators. That is, while I concede that appreciators imagine (de re) of the fictional works they experience that they are thus and so, (...)
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  3. Gaston Bachelard (1994). The Poetics of Space. Beacon Press.
    The classic book on how we experience intimate spaces. "A magical book. . . . A prism through which all worlds from literary creation to housework to aesthetics to carpentry take on enhanced--and enchanted-significances. Every reader of it will never see ordinary spaces in ordinary ways. Instead the reader will see with the soul of the eye, the glint of Gaston Bachelard." --from the foreword by John R. Stilgoe 6473-4 / $15.00tx / paperback.
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  4. G. Backhaus (2001). Tymieniecka’s Phenomenology of Life: The “Imaginatio Creatrix,” Subliminal Passions, and the Moral Sense. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (1):103-134.
    Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka expands the phenomenological study of meanings (sense-bestowal) into an onto-genetic inquiry by grounding it in a phenomenology of life, including the emotional dimension. This phenomenology of life is informed by the empirical sciences and its doctrines parallel the new scientific paradigm of open dynamic systems. Embedded in the dynamics of the real individuation of life forms, human consciousness emerges at a unique station in the evolutionary process. Tymieniecka treats the constitution of sense as a function of life, and (...)
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  5. Owen Barfield (2006). The Rediscovery of Meaning: And Other Essays. Barfield Press.
    The rediscovery of meaning -- Dream, myth, and philosophical double vision -- The meaning of 'literal' -- Poetic diction and legal fiction -- The harp and the camera -- Where is fancy bred? -- The rediscovery of allegory (I) -- The rediscovery of allegory (II) -- Imagination and inspiration -- Language and discovery -- Matter, imagination, and spirit -- Self and reality -- Science and quality -- The coming trauma of materialism -- Participation and isolation: a fresh light on present (...)
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  6. R. W. Beardsmore (1980). The Limits of Imagination. British Journal of Aesthetics 20 (2):99-114.
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  7. Günter Berghaus (ed.) (2009). Futurism and the Technological Imagination. Rodopi.
    This volume, Futurism and the Technological Imagination, results from a conference of the International Society for the Study of European Ideas in Helsinki.
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  8. Rosemary Betterton (2006). Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination. Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and (...)
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  9. H. Gene Blocker (1972). Another Look at Aesthetic Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (4):529-536.
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  10. Harry Blocker (1965). Kant's Theory of the Relation of Imagination and Understanding in Aesthetic Judgements of Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 5 (1):37-45.
  11. David Bohm (1996/2004). On Creativity. Routledge.
    Creativity is fundamental to human experience. In On Creativity David Bohm, the world-renowned scientist, investigates the phenomenon from all sides. This is a remarkable and life-affirming book by one of the most far-sighted thinkers of modern.
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  12. Emily Brady (2011). Adam Smith's ''Sympathetic Imagination'' and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Environment. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):95-109.
    This paper explores the significance of Adam Smith's ideas for defending non-cognitivist theories of aesthetic appreciation of nature. Objections to non-cognitivism argue that the exercise of emotion and imagination in aesthetic judgement potentially sentimentalizes and trivializes nature. I argue that although directed at moral judgement, Smith's views also find a place in addressing this problem. First, sympathetic imagination may afford a deeper and more sensitive type of aesthetic engagement. Second, in taking up the position of the impartial spectator, aesthetic judgements (...)
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  13. Emily Brady (1998). Imagination and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):139-147.
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  14. L. Briskman (1981). Creative Product and Creative Process in Science and Art. In Denis Dutton & Michael Krausz (eds.), The Concept of Creativity in Science and Art. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston. 83 – 106.
    The main aim of this essay is to propose and develop a product?oriented, non?psychologistic, approach to scientific and artistic creativity. I first argue that the central problem is that of answering the question: how is creativity possible? Traditional approaches to this question tend to locate creativity primarily in some special psychological processes or traits, or in some special creative act. Some general arguments against such an approach are developed, and it is suggested that creativity ought primarily to be located in (...)
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  15. Larry Briskman (1980). Creative Product and Creative Process in Science and Art. Inquiry 23 (1):83 – 106.
    The main aim of this essay is to propose and develop a product?oriented, non?psychologistic, approach to scientific and artistic creativity. I first argue that the central problem is that of answering the question: how is creativity possible? Traditional approaches to this question tend to locate creativity primarily in some special psychological processes or traits, or in some special creative act. Some general arguments against such an approach are developed, and it is suggested that creativity ought primarily to be located in (...)
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  16. Murray Wright Bundy (1927/1978). The Theory of Imagination in Classical and Mediaeval Thought. R. West.
    Pre-Socratic philosophy. - Plato. - Aristotle. - Post-Aristotelian philosophy. - The Theory of art: Quintilian, Longinus, and Philostratus. - Plotinus. - The lesser Neoplatonists. - Neoplatonic views of three early Christians. - Mediaeval descriptive psychology. - The psychology of the mystics. - Dante's theory of vision. - Conclusion.
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  17. H. G. Callaway (2007). Emerson and Santayana on Imagination. In Flamm And Skowronski (ed.), Under Any Sky, Contemporary Readings on George Santayana.
    This paper examines Santayana on imagination, and related themes, chiefly as these are expressed in his early work, Interpretations of Poetry and Religion (1900). My hypothesis is that Santayana under-estimates, in this book, the force and significance of the prevalent distinction between imagination and fancy, as this was originally put forward by Coleridge and later developed in Emerson’s late essays. I will focus on some of those aspects of Santayana’s book which appear to react to or to engage with Emerson’s (...)
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  18. H. G. Callaway (2006). Emerson on Creativity in Thought and Action. In , R.W. Emerson, The Conduct of Life: A Philosophical Reading.
    The opening essay of Emerson’s 1860 book, The Conduct of Life, posed, in that fateful year of threatening Civil War and disunion, the philosophical problem of human freedom and fate. The essay “Fate” is followed in the present book by a series of essays on related themes, including: “Power,” “Wealth,” “Culture,” “Worship,” “Beauty” and “Illusions.” The central question of the volume is, “How shall I live?” Appreciating both our freedom and its limits, we understand the vitality of power to acquire (...)
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  19. Elisabeth Camp (2009). Two Varieties of Literary Imagination: Metaphor, Fiction, and Thought Experiments. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):107-130.
    Recently, philosophers have discovered that they have a lot to learn from, or at least to ponder about, fiction. Many metaphysicians are attracted to fiction as a model for our talk about purported objects and properties, such as numbers, morality, and possible worlds, without embracing a robust Platonist ontology. In addition, a growing group of philosophers of mind are interested in the implications of our engagement with fiction for our understanding of the mind and emotions: If I don’t believe that (...)
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  20. W. Charlton (1975). Art and Imagination By Roger Scruton Methuen, 1974, Viii + 256 Pp., £4.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 50 (193):367-.
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  21. Jinhee Choi (2005). Leaving It Up to the Imagination: POV Shots and Imagining From the Inside. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):17–25.
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  22. Elizabeth Christie (1979). Indian Philosophers on Poetic Imagination (Pratibhā). Journal of Indian Philosophy 7 (2):153-207.
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  23. Paula M. Cooey (1994). Religious Imagination and the Body: A Feminist Analysis. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years feminist scholarship has increasingly focused on the importance of the body and its representations in virtually every social, cultural, and intellectual context. Many have argued that because women are more closely identified with their bodies, they have access to privileged and different kinds of knowledge than men. In this landmark new book, Paula Cooey offers a different perspective on the significance of the body in the context of religious life and practice. Building on the pathbreaking work of (...)
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  24. Nicholas Cook (1990). Music, Imagination, and Culture. Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on psychological and philosophical materials as well as the analysis of specific musical examples, Cook here defines the difference between music...
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  25. Brandon Cooke (2007). Imagining Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):29-45.
    Aesthetic discourse is highly metaphorical, and many art-critical metaphors seem to be genuinely informative. Aesthetic property realism holds that the characteristic terms of aesthetic discourse pick out mind-independent properties. The prevalence of metaphor is a problem for realism, then, because most art-critical metaphors are true only when artworks are imagined in a certain way. Realist attempts to consign metaphor to the roles of filling lexical gaps or picking out mind-independent but ineffable properties fail. I argue that a cognitivist aesthetic anti-realism (...)
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  26. Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.) (2011). Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press.
    Empathy has for a long time, at least since the eighteenth century, been seen as centrally important in relation to our capacity to gain a grasp of the content of other people's minds, and predict and explain what they will think, feel, and do; and in relation to our capacity to respond to others ethically. In addition, empathy is seen as having a central role in aesthetics, in the understanding of our engagement with works of art and with fictional characters. (...)
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  27. Daniel Cottom (1981). Taste and the Civilized Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (4):367-380.
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  28. Gregory Currie (1995). Imagination as Simulation: Aesthetics Meets Cognitive Science. In Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.), Mental Simulation. Blackwell.
  29. Gregory Currie (1993). Impersonal Imagining: A Reply to Jerrold Levinson. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (170):79-82.
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  30. Gregory Currie (1990). The Nature of Fiction. Cambridge University Press.
    This important new book provides a theory about the nature of fiction, and about the relation between the author, the reader, and the fictional text.
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  31. Gregory Currie & Ian Ravenscroft (2002). Recreative Minds: Imagination in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Recreative Minds develops a philosophical theory of imagination that draws upon the latest work in psychology. This theory illuminates the use of imagination in coming to terms with art, its role in enabling us to live as social beings, and the psychological consequences of disordered imagination. The authors offer a lucid exploration of a fascinating subject.
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  32. E. M. Dadlez (2010). Seeing and Imagination: Emotional Response to Fictional Film. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):120-135.
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  33. Subrata Dasgupta (2008). Shedding Computational Light on Human Creativity. Perspectives on Science 16 (2):pp. 121-136.
    Ever since 1956 when details of the Logic Theorist were published by Newell and Simon, a large literature has accumulated on computational models and theories of the creative process, especially in science, invention and design. But what exactly do these computational models/theories tell us about the way that humans have actually conducted acts of creation in the past? What light has computation shed on our understanding of the creative process? Addressing these questions, we put forth three propositions: (I) Computational models (...)
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  34. David Davies (2008). Collingwood's ‘Performance’ Theory of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (2):162-174.
    Even if we reject the Wollheimian reading of Collingwood as an Idealist in the ontology of art, it remains puzzling how his non-Idealist ontology fits with his idea of art as expression. In trying to clarifying these matters, I argue that (i) the work of art, for Collingwood, is an activity, not the product of an activity; (ii) puzzling features of the Principles arise from attempts to reconcile this claim with the idea of art as expression while preserving the art/craft (...)
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  35. Daniel C. Dennett (1990). Memes and the Exploitation of Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (2):127-135.
    The general issue to be addressed in a Mandel Lecture is how (or whether) art promotes human evolution or development. I shall understand the term "art" in its broadest connotations--perhaps broader than the American Society for Aesthetics would normally recognize: I shall understand art to include all artifice, all human invention. What I shall say will a fortiori include art in the narrower sense, but I don't intend to draw particular attention to the way my thesis applies to it.
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  36. W. Desmond (1976). Collingwood, Imagination and Epistemology. Philosophical Studies 24:82-103.
  37. John Dilworth (2008). Imaginative Versus Analytical Experiences of Wines. In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Wine and Philosophy. Blackwell.
    The highly enjoyable experiences associated with drinking good wines have been widely misunderstood. It is common to regard wine appreciation as an analytical or quasi-scientific kind of activity, in which wine experts carefully distinguish the precise sensory qualities of each wine, and then pass on their accumulated factual knowledge to less experienced wine enthusiasts. However, this model of wine appreciation is seriously defective. One good way to show its defects is to provide a better and more fundamental scientific account of (...)
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  38. Tyler Doggett & Andy Egan (2012). How We Feel About Terrible, Non-Existent Mafiosi. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (2):277-306.
    We argue for an imaginative analog of desire from premises about imaginative engagement with fiction. There's a bit about the paradox of fiction, too.
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  39. F. Dorsch (2005). Review: Hegel's Theory of Imagination. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (3):309-311.
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  40. Fabian Dorsch (2011). Emotional Imagining and Our Responses to Fiction. Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 46:153-176.
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  41. D. Dryden (2004). Memory, Imagination, and the Cognitive Value of the Arts. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):254-267.
  42. Denis Dutton & Michael Krausz (eds.) (1981). The Concept of Creativity in Science and Art. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston.
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  43. Fons Elders (2001). The Sublime and the Beautiful on Ontology and Creative Imagination. Vub University Press.
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  44. Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.) (1996). Beyond Representation: Philosophy and Poetic Imagination. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume explore the ways in which traditional philosophical problems about self-knowledge, self-identity, and value have migrated into literature since the Romantic and Idealist periods. How do so-called literary works take up these problems in a new way? What conception of the subject is involved in this literary practice? How are the lines of demarcation between philosophy and literature problematised? The contributors examine these issues with reference both to Romantic and Idealist writers and to some of their (...)
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  45. Catherine Z. Elgin (2002). Creation as Reconfiguration: Art in the Advancement of Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):13 – 25.
    Cognitive advancement is not always a matter of acquiring new information. It often consists in reconfiguration--in reorganizing a domain so that hitherto overlooked or underemphasized features, patterns, opportunities, and resources come to light. Several modes of reconfiguration prominent in the arts--metaphor, fiction, exemplification, and perspective--play important roles in science as well. They do not perform the same roles as literal, descriptive, perspectiveless scientific truths. But to understand how science advances understanding, we need to appreciate the ineliminable cognitive contributions of non-literal, (...)
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  46. R. K. Elliott (1981). Aestheticism, Imagination and Schooling: A Reply to Ruby Meager. Journal of Philosophy of Education 15 (1):33–42.
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  47. Andreas Elpidorou (2010). Imagination in Non-Representational Painting. In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge.
  48. A. Everett (2007). Review: The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (464):1151-1154.
  49. Susan L. Feagin (1984). Some Pleasures of Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (1):41-55.
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  50. David E. W. Fenner (2010). Context Building and Educating Imaginative Engagement. Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (3):109-123.
    In my experience—with students, colleagues, friends, myself—I find that most people view aesthetic objects and art objects (which sometimes overlap but not always) through a variety of "lenses": subjectively located, psychologically based perspectives or "contexts" through which the object is viewed, considered, appreciated, and many times even criticized. I believe that many times the depth and richness of aesthetic reward depends on the perspective through which the subject attends to an object or event. While a part of aesthetic perspectival context (...)
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