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  1. C. P. A. (1957). The Pattern of Authority. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 11 (1):167-167.
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  2. Farid Abdel-Nour (forthcoming). Responsible for the State: The Case of Obedient Subjects. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885114554465.
    This article explains how we ordinary subjects of a state who are neither political leaders nor functionaries are responsible for outcomes that are properly attributed to that state and that took place during our adult lifetime. Its focus is on the connection we forge to those outcomes via our obedience alone. If our responsibility as subjects is justified, it would apply under all regime types including oppressive and authoritarian ones. The argument is that this responsibility can only be justified within (...)
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  3. Harry Adams (2008). Against Plutocracies: Fighting Political Corruption. Constellations 15 (1):126-147.
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  4. Timo Airaksinen (1984). Coercion, Deterrence, and Authority. Theory and Decision 17 (2):105-117.
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  5. Thornton Anderson (1982). Book Review:The Practice of Political Authority: Authority and the Authoritative. Richard E. Flathman. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (1):164-.
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  6. Arthur Isak Applbaum (2010). Legitimacy Without the Duty to Obey. Philosophy and Public Affairs 38 (3):215-239.
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  7. Sven Arntzen (1996). Kant on Duty to Oneself and Resistance to Political Authority. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):409-424.
    Kant on Duty to Oneself and Resistance to Political Authority SVEN ARNTZEN in ms DOCTRI~tE OF Law and related writings? Kant denies the subject's right to resist political authority in the strongest terms. His argumentation to sup- port this denial is conceptual in character. The denial of a right of resistance follows from the relevant legal concepts of civil society, of the people as sub- ject, of the head of state as the supreme power in civil society, as having only (...)
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  8. Iain Atack (2006). Nonviolent Political Action and the Limits of Consent. Theoria 53 (111):87-107.
    The consent theory of power, whereby ruling elites depend ultimately on the submission, cooperation and obedience of the governed as their source of power, is often linked to debates about the effectiveness of non-violent political action. According to this theory, ruling elites depend ultimately on the submission, cooperation and obedience of the governed as their source of power. If this cooperation is with-drawn, then this power is undermined. Iain Atack outlines this theory and examines its strengths and weaknesses. Atack argues (...)
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  9. S. I. Benn & R. S. Peters (1961). Social Principles and the Democratic State. Philosophy 36 (137):251-254.
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  10. Harry Beran (1983). What is the Basis of Political Authority? The Monist 66 (4):487-499.
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  11. Joseph J. Bien (2011). On State Legitimacy. Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (2):75-77.
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  12. David Braybrooke (1960). Authority as a Subject of Social Science and Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 13 (3):469 - 485.
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  13. G. S. Brett (1931). Book Review:The Ethical Basis of Political Authority. W. W. Willoughby. [REVIEW] Ethics 41 (2):238-.
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  14. Allen Buchanan (1999). Recognitional Legitimacy and the State System. Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (1):46–78.
  15. D. J. C. Carmichael (1989). Book Review:The Consent Theory of Political Obligation. Harry Beran. [REVIEW] Ethics 99 (4):949-.
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  16. Craig L. Carr (1983). The Problem of Political Authority. The Monist 66 (4):472-486.
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  17. Naima Chahboun (2015). Nonideal Theory and Compliance—A Clarification. European Journal of Political Theory 14 (2):229-245.
    This paper examines the various ways in which nonideal theory responds to noncompliance with ideal principles of justice. Taking Rawls’ definition of nonideal theory as my point of departure, I propose an understanding of this concept as comprising two subparts: Complementary nonideal theory responds to deliberate and avoidable noncompliance and consists mainly of theories of civil disobedience, rebellion, and retribution. Substitutive nonideal theory responds to nondeliberate and unavoidable noncompliance and consists mainly of theories of transition and caretaking. I further argue (...)
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  18. Joseph Chan (2014). Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times. Princeton University Press.
    Since the very beginning, Confucianism has been troubled by a serious gap between its political ideals and the reality of societal circumstances. Contemporary Confucians must develop a viable method of governance that can retain the spirit of the Confucian ideal while tackling problems arising from nonideal modern situations. The best way to meet this challenge, Joseph Chan argues, is to adopt liberal democratic institutions that are shaped by the Confucian conception of the good rather than the liberal conception of the (...)
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  19. Joseph Chan (2012). Political Authority and Perfectionism: A Response to Quong. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  20. Thomas Christiano (1999). Justice and Disagreement at the Foundations of Political Authority. Ethics 110 (1):165-187.
  21. Joshua Cohen (1986). Structure, Choice, and Legitimacy: Locke's Theory of the State. Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (4):301-324.
  22. David Copp (1999). The Idea of a Legitimate State. Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (1):3–45.
  23. Renato Cristi (2010). Nietzsche On Authority and the State. Animus 14:3-15.
    This paper criticizes the postmodern view that Nietzsche opposed authority in general and the authority of the state in particular. This view exaggerates Nietzsche's individualistic tendencies and ignores the important role that non-normative political authority plays in his thought. Nietzsche's preference for the aristocratic states of antiquity and his antagonism towards the modern democratic state should be taken into account. The modern democratic state demands normative authority based on popular consent, while the ancient aristocratic state made room for the non-normative (...)
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  24. J. F. D. (1958). Authority. Review of Metaphysics 12 (1):144-144.
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  25. J. F. D. (1958). Authority. Review of Metaphysics 12 (1):144-144.
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  26. Richard Dagger (1980). The Problem of Political Obligation: A Critical Analysis of Liberal Theory. [REVIEW] Political Theory 8 (3):409-413.
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  27. Meir Dan-cohen (1994). In Defense of Defiance. Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (1):24–51.
  28. François De Smet (2011). Le Tiers Autoritaire: Essai Sur la Nature de l'Autorité Politique. Les Éditions du Cerf.
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  29. Jude P. Dougherty (2000). Simon, Yves R. Philosopher at Work: Essays by Yves R. Simon. Review of Metaphysics 53 (4):959-960.
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  30. William A. Edmundson (2010). Political Authority, Moral Powers and the Intrinsic Value of Obedience. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (1):179-191.
    Three concepts—authority, obedience and obligation—are central to understanding law and political institutions. The three are also involved in the legitimation of the state: an apology for the state has to make a normative case for the state’s authority, for its right to command obedience, and for the citizen’s obligation to obey the state’s commands. Recent discussions manifest a cumulative scepticism about the apologist’s task. Getting clear about the three concepts is, of..
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  31. Dorothy Emmet (1960). Social Principles and the Democratic State. Philosophical Books 1 (2):2-4.
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  32. David Estlund (2005). Political Authority and the Tyranny of Non‐Consent. Philosophical Issues 15 (1):351–367.
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  33. J. P. Euben (1977). Books in Review : TWILIGHT OF AUTHORITY by Robert Nisbet. Oxford University Press, 1975. Pp. Vii, 287. $10.95. Political Theory 5 (1):119-124.
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  34. Walter Farrell (1938). The Philosophy of Sovereignty. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 14:103-111.
  35. Richard K. Fenn (1986). The Spirit of Revolt: Anarchism and the Cult of Authority. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  36. J. Ferguson & T. Molnar (1986). On Legitimacy. Diogenes 34 (134):60-77.
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  37. James Fishkin (1980). Book Review:Principles of Legislation: The Uses of Political Authority. Michael D. Bayles. [REVIEW] Ethics 90 (4):618-.
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  38. Antony Flew (1983). Review: Legitimacy and the Gadfly Challenge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 33 (130):84 - 89.
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  39. Charles Frankel (1972). Political Disobedience and the Denial of Political Authority. Social Theory and Practice 2 (1):85-98.
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  40. Michael Fœssel (2006). Legitimations of the State: The Weakening of Authority and the Restoration of Power. Constellations 13 (3):308-319.
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  41. Paul Guyer (2012). Hobbes Is of the Opposite Opinion Kant and Hobbes on the Three Authorities in the State. Hobbes Studies 25 (1):91-119.
    Like Hobbes and unlike Locke, Kant denied the possibility of a right to rebellion. But unlike Hobbes, Kant did not argue for a unitary head of state in whom legislative, judicial, and executive powers are inseparable, and thus did not believe that the executive power in a state to whom must be conceded a monopoly of coercion also defines all rights in the state. Instead, Kant insisted upon the necessary division of authority in a state into a separate legislature, executive, (...)
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  42. Elizabeth Gyori (2007). Philosophy as a Threat to Government. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 7:2-3.
    Examination of the subversive nature of philosophy as its students challenge the authority and practices of government agencies and organizations. Draws a series of connections between philosophically oriented protesters and questioners of authority ranging from Socrates to 2004 protesters at the U.S. Republican party’s presidential convention in 2004.
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  43. Toby Handfield & Patrick Emerton (2009). Order and Affray: Defensive Privileges in Warfare. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (4):382 - 414.
    Just war theory is a difficult, even paradoxical, philosophical topic. It is not just that warfare involves large-scale, organised, deliberate killing, and hence might seem the very paradigm of immorality. The just war tradition sharply divorces the question of whether or not it is permissible to resort to war – the question of jus ad bellum – from the question of how and against whom one may inflict harm once at war – the question of jus in bello. As Michael (...)
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  44. Rebecca Roman Hanrahan & Louise M. Antony (2005). Because I Said So: Toward a Feminist Theory of Authority. Hypatia 20 (4):59-79.
    : Feminism is an antiauthoritarian movement that has sought to unmask many traditional "authorities" as ungrounded. Given this, it might seem as if feminists are required to abandon the concept of authority altogether. But, we argue, the exercise of authority enables us to coordinate our efforts to achieve larger social goods and, hence, should be preserved. Instead, what is needed and what we provide for here is a way to distinguish legitimate authority from objectionable authoritarianism.
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  45. Virginia Held (2005). Legitimate Authority in Non-State Groups Using Violence. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (2):175–193.
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  46. David Henreckson (2010). A Gift Half Understood: Rediscovering an Incarnational View of Political Authority. Heythrop Journal 51 (4):554-566.
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  47. Timothy Hinton (2010). Naturalism and Authority. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):152-168.
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  48. John Horton (2005). Peter Winch and Political Authority. Philosophical Investigations 28 (3):235–252.
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  49. Duncan Ivison, Consent, Contestation and the Subject of Rights.
    That consent could wholly explain – either descriptively or normatively – the legitimacy of the structure of political community and its most important and influential institutions and practices is deeply implausible. There are two general sorts of considerations adduced against such a proposition. First, history simply refutes it: force is an essential feature of the founding of any political society, and arguably, for its continued existence, and power relations, in all their complexity, are imperfectly tracked by consent. Moreover, there are (...)
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  50. Curtis Johnson (2008). Political Authority and Obligation in Aristotle. Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):439-447.
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