Search results for 'Human Sciences' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Roger Smith (1997). History and the History of the Human Sciences: What Voice? History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):22-39.score: 75.0
    This paper discusses the historical voice in the history of the human sci ences. I address the question, 'Who speaks?', as a question about disci plinary identities and conventions of writing - identities and conventions which have the appearance of conditions of knowledge, in an area of activity where academic history and the history of science or intellectual history meet. If, as this paper contends, the subject-matter of the history of the human sciences is inherently contestable because (...)
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  2. Julian Hamann (2011). 'Bildung' in German Human Sciences: The Discursive Transformation of a Concept. History of the Human Sciences 24 (5):48-72.score: 75.0
    This article analyses the transformation of the notion of Bildung that is constructed in the German human sciences. From a perspective of field theory and discourse analysis, the article reveals how the notion evolves and stabilizes during a first stage (1810–60), how it comes under pressure because of the contextual changes in a second stage (1860–1960) and how the tension increases before it is resolved by a fundamental change of the traditional notion of Bildung in a third stage (...)
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  3. Mark Bevir (2002). A Humanist Critique of the Archaeology of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 15 (1):119-138.score: 75.0
    Foucault's archaeological method is contrasted with that of a humanist history. The contrast highlights strengths and weaknesses found in Foucault's approach. It is argued that he is right to reject a concept of objective knowledge based on pure facts and pure reason; and that he is right to reject the idea of the autonomous individual uninfluenced by the social context; but that he is wrong to extend these rejections to an utter repudiation of respectively our having reasonable knowledge of an (...)
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  4. Rui Silva (forthcoming). Ceteris Paribus Laws and the Human Sciences. Ceteris Paribus Laws and the Human Sciences 4 (34):851-867.score: 75.0
    Silva-Rui_Ceteris-paribus-laws-and-the-human-sciences.
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  5. John C. Burnham (2000). Changing Metaphors in History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):121-124.score: 75.0
    A generation or more ago, as the Cold War flourished, the continental European\nscholars whom I met seemed odd to me. They were, virtually without\nexception, totally preoccupied with whether their scholarship harmonized\nwith Marxism or refuted Marxism. This focus cut across disciplinary lines.\nIndeed, a basic assumption united these colleagues: the scholars’ world,\nwhether Karl Marx or Max Weber, consisted of centralized bureaucracies\nsuitable for socialism or at least for orderly organization.\nNorth American scholars shared with the Europeans, not the preoccupation\nwith Marxism, but the idea that (...)
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  6. James Good (2000). The Historical Imagination in the Human Sciences Introduction: The Historical Imagination and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):97-101.score: 75.0
    The historical imagination, as Hayden White has reminded us, is not singular;\nit is manifest in many forms (White, 1973). Not surprisingly, this diversity\nis reflected within the pages of History of the Human Sciences and in the four papers that follow. Indeed, from its inception, the journal has sought to\npromote a variety of styles of writing, representing the many voices that have\nan interest in the human sciences and their history.\nIn the opening article, Roger Smith suggests that a (...)
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  7. Alan How (2011). Hermeneutics and the 'Classic' Problem in the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 24 (3):47-63.score: 75.0
    There has been a long-standing and acrimonious debate in the human sciences over the role played by classic texts. Advocates of the classic insist its value is timeless and rests on the intrinsic superiority of its cognitive insights and aesthetic virtues. Critics, by contrast, argue that the respect accorded the classic is spurious because it conceals the ideological assumptions, tensions and discontinuities of tradition. This article seeks a solution through the account of ‘the classical’ brought by Hans-Georg Gadamer (...)
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  8. Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (2013). The Natural Vs. The Human Sciences:: Myth, Methodology and Ontology. Discusiones Filosóficas 14 (22):25-41.score: 74.0
    I argue that the human sciences (i.e. humanities, social- and behavioural sciences) should not try to imitate the methodology of the natural sciences. The human sciences study meaningful phenomena whose nature is decisively different from the merely physical phenomena studied by the natural sciences, and whose study therefore require different methods; meaningful phenomena do not obviously obey natural laws while the merely physical necessarily does. This is not to say that the human (...)
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  9. J. Pickles (1985). Phenomenology, Science, and Geography: Spatiality and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    A work of outstanding originality and importance, which will become a cornerstone in the philosophy of geography, this book asks: What is human science? Is a truly human science of geography possible? What notions of spatiality adequately describe human spatial experience and behaviour? It sets out to answer these questions through a discussion of the nature of science in the human sciences, and, specifically, of the role of phenomenology in such inquiry. It criticises established understanding (...)
     
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  10. Quentin Skinner (ed.) (1985). The Return of Grand Theory in the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 67.0
    This is a volume of new essays introducing the most influential developments in social and political theory over the last thirty years. In that period empiricism and the positivist ideal of the unification of science have been undermined and transformed by the impact of different, frequently Continental, traditions of thought. The introduction charts these charges and each of the contributors provides a brief and lucid account of the thought of one major figure or school which have helped to bring about (...)
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  11. George Steinmetz (ed.) (2005). The Politics of Method in the Human Sciences: Positivism and its Epistemological Others. Duke University Press.score: 66.0
     
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  12. Charles Taylor (1985). Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    Charles Taylor has been one of the most original and influential figures in contemporary philosophy: his 'philosophical anthropology' spans an unusually wide range of theoretical interests and draws creatively on both Anglo-American and Continental traditions in philosophy. A selection of his published papers is presented here in two volumes, structured to indicate the direction and essential unity of the work. He starts from a polemical concern with behaviourism and other reductionist theories (particularly in psychology and the philosophy of language) which (...)
     
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  13. Ali Hassan Zaidi (2011). Islam, Modernity, and the Human Sciences. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 66.0
    This book discloses a largely unnoticed dialogue between Muslim and Western social thought on the search for meaning and transcendence in the human sciences. The disclosure is accomplished by a comparative reading of contemporary Muslim debates on secular knowledge on the one hand, and of a foundational Western debate on the demise of metaphysics in the human sciences on the other hand. The comparative reading is grounded in a dialogical hermeneutic approach; that is, a hermeneutic approach (...)
     
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  14. Dimitri Ginev (1998). Rhetoric and Double Hermeneutics in the Human Sciences. Human Studies 21 (3):259-271.score: 63.0
    Based on an analysis of double hermeneutics in the human sciences, a distinction between a weak and a strong rhetorical analysis of human-scientific research is introduced, taking account of the self-reflective character of hermeneutic interpretation. The paper argues that there are three hermeneutic topics in the research process for human-scientific experience, which are associated with applying specific rhetorical tools. The three topics are described under the following rubrics: (a) bridging the gap between experience-near and experience-distant concepts; (...)
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  15. Donald McIntosh (1997). Husserl, Weber, Freud, and the Method of the Human Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (3):328-353.score: 63.0
    In the debate between the natural science and the phenomenological or hermeneutical approaches in the human sciences, a third alternative described by Husserl has been widely ignored. Contrary to frequent assumptions, Husserl believed that a purely phenomenological method is not generally the appropriate approach for the empirical human sciences. Rather, he held that although they can and should make important use of phenomenological analysis, such sciences should take their basic stance in the "natural attitude," the (...)
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  16. Marvin Stauch (1992). Natural Science, Social Science, and Democratic Practice: Some Political Implications of the Distinction Between the Natural and the Human Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 22 (3):337-356.score: 63.0
    This article examines some of the contributions to the contemporary debate over the question of whether there is an important distinction to be made between the natural and the human sciences. In particular, the article looks at the arguments that Charles Taylor has put forward for the recognition of a radical discontinuity between these forms of science and then examines Richard Rorty's objections to Taylor's distinction and argues that Rorty misunderstands the reasons for this distinction and thereby misses (...)
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  17. Marco Buzzoni (2003). On Medicine as a Human Science. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (1):79-94.score: 63.0
    All the powerful influences exertedby the subjective-interpersonal dimension onthe organic or technical-functional dimensionof sickness and health do not make anintersubjective test concerning medicaltherapeutic results impossible. Theseinfluences are not arbitrary; on the contrary,they obey laws that are de facto sufficientlystable to allow predictions and explanationssimilar to those of experimental sciences.While, in this respect, the rules concerninghuman action are analogous to the scientificlaws of nature, they can at any time be revokedby becoming aware of them. Law-like andreproducible regularities in the (...) ofman are by no means separated from a patient'spersonal-hermeneutic mediation. This makes itpossible for human beings to modify, improve orsometimes even entirely (or better almostentirely) suspend these psychological,sociological, ethnological, medical,regularities. For this reason the sciences ofman including medicine are under the obligationof constantly inspecting the continuingvalidity of the rules on which theirpredictions and explanations are based, namelyby indirect, statistical methods. Thisrequires a synergistic collaboration ofextra-clinical and clinical tests through whichmedicine can obtain a good level ofintersubjective testability. (shrink)
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  18. Dimitri Ginev (2012). Diltheyan Varieties of Double Hermeneutics in the Human Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (1):0048393112449657.score: 63.0
    In this volume, the authors seek to analyze the actual influence of Dilthey’s philosophy of the human sciences on various contemporary debates. They are convinced that Dilthey’s interpretative-holistic epistemology provides a good starting point for engaging with alternative conceptions of the human sciences. Throughout the volume, the authors illustrate the importance of Dilthey’s main concepts for constituting the human-scientific objects of inquiry qua historically contextualized objects of inquiry. It is the interpretative reflection on the forms (...)
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  19. Wilhelm Dilthey (1988). Introduction to the Human Sciences: An Attempt to Lay a Foundation for the Study of Society and History. Wayne State University Press.score: 62.0
    This book is a pioneering effort to elaborate a general theory of the human sciences, especially history, and to distinguish these sciences radically from the ...
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  20. Jitendranath Mohanty (ed.) (1984/1985). Phenomenology and the Human Sciences. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 62.0
    Man and World 7:241 -243 ( 984) ©Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands INTRODUCTION The Phenomenology and the Human Sciences was ...
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  21. Calvin O. Schrag (1980). Radical Reflection and the Origin of the Human Sciences. Purdue University Press.score: 62.0
    This is a book about the human sciences. However, it is not a treatise on scientific methodology nor is it a proposal for a unification of the human sciences through an integration of their findings within a general conceptual scheme.
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  22. Thomas Sturm (2011). Freedom and the Human Sciences: Hume’s Science of Man Versus Kant’s Pragmatic Anthropology. Kant Yearbook 3 (1):23-42.score: 60.0
    In his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, Kant formulates the idea of the empirical investigation of the human being as a free agent. The notion is puzzling: Does Kant not often claim that, from an empirical point of view, human beings cannot be considered as free? What sense would it make anyway to include the notion of freedom in science? The answer to these questions lies in Kant’s notion of character. While probably all concepts of character (...)
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  23. Brian Leiter, The Epistemic Status of the Human Sciences: Critical Reflections on Foucault.score: 60.0
    Any reader of Foucault's corpus recognizes fairly quickly that it is animated by an ethical impulse, namely, to liberate individuals from a kind of oppression from which they suffer. This oppression, however, does not involve the familiar tyranny of the Leviathan or the totalitarian state; it exploits instead values that the victim of oppression herself accepts, and which then leads the oppressed agent to be complicit in her subjugation. It also depends, crucially, on a skeptical thesis about the epistemology of (...)
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  24. Theodore R. Schatzki (1991). Elements of a Wittgensteinian Philosophy of the Human Sciences. Synthese 87 (2):311 - 329.score: 60.0
    In this paper, a Wittgensteinian account of the human sciences is constructed around the notions of the surface of human life and of surface phenomena as expressions. I begin by explaining Wittgenstein's idea that the goal of interpretive social science is to make actions and practices seem natural. I then explicate his notions of the surface of life and of surface phenomena as expressions by reviewing his analysis of mental state language. Finally, I critically examine three ideas: (...)
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  25. Saulo de Freitas Araujo (2012). Book Review: Kant and the Philosophical Foundations of the Human Sciences. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 25 (1):140-145.score: 60.0
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  26. Efram Sera-Shriar (forthcoming). What is Armchair Anthropology? Observational Practices in 19th-Century British Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences.score: 60.0
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  27. Eugenie Gatens-Robinson (1986). Clinical Judgment and the Rationality of the Human Sciences. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 11 (2):167-178.score: 60.0
    Rationality in medicine is frequently construed as hypotheticodeductive. This article argues that such a model gives a distorted view of the rational character of an enterprise that makes judgments about individual human well-being. Medicine as a science is a practical human science. Seen as such, its rational orientation is one that applies general knowledge to particular situations. It is argued that such an orientation is not deductive but interpretative. The Aristotelian concept of practical wisdom (‘phron sis’) is used (...)
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  28. Irving Velody (1998). The Archive and the Human Sciences: Notes Towards a Theory of the Archive. History of the Human Sciences 11 (4):1-16.score: 60.0
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  29. Petteri Pietikainen (2003). Consciousness Historicized: Philosophical History and the Nature of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):151-158.score: 60.0
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  30. Saulo de Freitas Araujo (2012). Book Review: Kant and the Philosophical Foundations of the Human Sciences. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 25 (1):140-145.score: 60.0
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  31. E. Bernard-Weil (2000). Does Help in Decision-Making in Biology Help in Decision-Making in Human Sciences and Conversely? Acta Biotheoretica 48 (3-4).score: 60.0
    A link between biological and human sciences may be established, under the condition that we should admit the existence of reciprocal influences between them. The model for the regulation of agonistic antagonistic couples (MRAAC) is built from the study of biological systems and gives rise to specific types of control. This model can be helpful in decision processes in some human sciences such as management, economical and political strategies. The reason for such an opportunity lies in (...)
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  32. Richard Harvey Brown (1995). Review : Richard H. Roberts and James M. M. Good (Eds) The Recovery of Rhetoric: Persuasive Discourse and Disciplinarity in the Human Sciences. Charlottesville/London: University Press of Virginia, 1993. Xii + 278 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 8 (3):143-144.score: 60.0
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  33. Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson, The Natural Vs Human Sciences: Myth, Methodology, and Ontology.score: 60.0
    I argue that the human sciences (i.e. humanities, social- and behavioural sciences) should not try to imitate the methodology of the natural sciences. The human sciences study meaningful phenomena whose nature is decisively different from the merely physical phenomena studied by the natural sciences, and whose study therefore require different methods; meaningful phenomena do not obviously obey natural laws while the merely physical necessarily does. This is not to say that the human (...)
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  34. Roger Smith (2005). Does Reflexivity Separate the Human Sciences From the Natural Sciences? History of the Human Sciences 18 (4):1-25.score: 60.0
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  35. Sam Whimster (1995). Review Article : Liberal Eugenics and the Vitalist Life Sciences: Incongruities in the German Human Sciences in the 19th Century Woodruff D. Smith, Politics and the Sciences of Culture in Germany, 1840-1920. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 8 (1):107-114.score: 60.0
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  36. Robin Williams (1994). Disciplinary Subjects and the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 7 (2):1-5.score: 60.0
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  37. Jean-Marie Tremblay (2000). Vincent Descombes, Philosophie des Représentations Collectives. Un Article Publié Dans Revue Scientifique, History of the Human Sciences, Vol. 13, No 1, 2000. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 13 (1).score: 60.0
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  38. Bruce Mazlish (2001). Reflections on the Human Sciences and Their History. History of the Human Sciences 14 (4):140-147.score: 60.0
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  39. John-Raphael Staude (1993). Autobiography, Ideology and the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 6 (2):121-128.score: 60.0
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  40. Gillian Beer & Herminio Martins (1990). Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 3:159.score: 60.0
     
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  41. Richard Bellamy, Peter M. Logan, John I. Brooks Iii, David Couzens Hoy, Michael Donnelly & James M. Glass (forthcoming). History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences.score: 60.0
     
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  42. Naomi Choi (2009). Defending Anti-Naturalism After the Interpretive Turn: Charles Taylor and the Human Sciences. History of Political Thought 30 (4):693-718.score: 60.0
    This article argues that while Charles Taylor's commitment to anti-naturalism in the human sciences has been constant, the grounds for that commitment have changed significantly over time. What began as his critique of naturalism on empirical grounds was refashioned into a commitment on moral grounds, or more accurately, on the basis of there being no distinctly separable grounds between the scientific and the moral. Taylor shifted his descriptive phenomenological defence of anti-naturalism to cast a much broader critique against (...)
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  43. John Christie (1993). The Human Sciences: Origins and Histories. History of the Human Sciences 6 (1):1-12.score: 60.0
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  44. Alix Cohen (2009). Kant and the Human Sciences: Biology, Anthropology and History. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: Freedom and the Human Sciences * The Model of Biological Science and its Implications for the Human Sciences * The Answer to the Question What Is Man? * Pragmatic Anthropology * Philosophical History * Conclusion * Bibliography Freedom and the Human Sciences * The Model of Biological Science and its Implications for the Human Sciences * The Answer to the Question What Is Man? * Pragmatic Anthropology * Philosophical (...)
     
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  45. David Frisby (1991). Reviews : Wilhelm Dilthey (Trans. Ramon J. Betanzos), Introduction to the Human Sciences: An Attempt to Lay a Foundation for the Study of Society and History, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester/Wheatsheaf, 1989, Paper £10.95, 386 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 4 (1):122-125.score: 60.0
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  46. Lewis Gordon (1995). Fanon and the Crisis of European Man: An Essay on Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Routledge.score: 60.0
    As the first book to analyze the work of Fanon as an existential-phenomenological of human sciences and liberation philosopher, Gordon deploys Fanon's work to illuminate how the "bad faith" of European science and civilization have philosophically stymied the project of liberation. Fanon's body of work serves as a critique of European science and society, and shows the ways in which the project of "truth" is compromised by Eurocentric artificially narrowed scope of humanity--a circumstance to which he refers as (...)
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  47. Colin Gordon, Robert Castel, Jg Merquior, Paul Rabinow & Andrew Scull (1990). Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 3.score: 60.0
     
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  48. Michael Grant (1992). Reviews : Alexandre Leupin (Ed.), Lacan and the Human Sciences. Lincoln, Nebr. And London: University of Nebraska Press, 1991. £19.95, 191 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 5 (2):154-156.score: 60.0
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  49. Seán Hand & Irving Velody (1997). Introduction: Who Speaks? The Voice in the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):1-8.score: 60.0
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  50. Lewis P. Hinchman & Sandra K. Hinchman (eds.) (1997). Memory, Identity, Community: The Idea of Narrative in the Human Sciences. State University of New York Press.score: 60.0
    This multidisciplinary volume documents the resurrection of the importance of narrative to the study of individuals and groups and argues that narrative may become a lingua franca of future debates in the human sciences.
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