Search results for 'Natural law Christianity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. N. MacCormick & Natural Law (1992). Natural Law Theory: Contemporary Essays. In Robert P. George (ed.), Natural Law Theory: Contemporary Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 1920.0
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  2. David Novak (2004). Is Natural Law a Border Concept Between Judaism and Christianity? Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (2):237-254.score: 576.0
    With the passing of disputations between Jewish and Christian thinkers as to whose tradition has a more universal ethics, the task of Jewish and Christian ethicists is to constitute a universal horizon for their respective bodies of ethics, both of which are essentially particularistic being rooted in special revelation. This parallel project must avoid relativism that is essentially anti-ethical, and triumphalism that proposes an imperialist ethos. A retrieval of the idea of natural law in each respective tradition enables the (...)
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  3. B. Goss & R. Vitz (forthcoming). Natural Law Among Moral Strangers. Christian Bioethics.score: 444.0
    Our goal in this paper is two-fold. First, we aim to clarify two ways in which contemporary Christian bioethicists have erred, on Engelhardt’s account, in their attempts to do bioethics within a distinctively non- Christian idiom, namely, either (1) by rejecting a principal metaethical thesis or (2) by misrepresenting a principal moral-epistemological thesis of natural-law ethics, properly construed. Second, we intend to show not only that Engelhardt can and should endorse the Christian bioethicists’ use of non-Christian moral idioms in (...)
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  4. Frank Van Dun (2001). Natural Law, Liberalism, and Christianity. Journal of Libertarian Studies 15 (3; SEAS SUM):1-36.score: 435.0
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  5. Stephen John Grabill (2006). Rediscovering the Natural Law in Reformed Theological Ethics. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 432.0
    Karl Barth and the displacement of natural law in contemporary Protestant theology -- Development of the natural-law tradition through the high Middle Ages -- John Calvin and the natural knowledge of God the Creator -- Peter Martyr Vermigli and the natural knowledge of God the Creator -- Natural law in the thought of Johannes Althusius -- Francis Turretin and the natural knowledge of God the Creator.
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  6. J. Budziszewski (2011). The Line Through the Heart: Natural Law as Fact, Theory, and Sign of Contradiction. Intercollegiate Studies Institute.score: 432.0
    Natural law as fact, theory, and sign of contradiction -- The second tablet project -- The mystery of what? -- The natural, the connatural, and the unnatural -- Accept no imitations: natural law vs. naturalism -- Thou shalt not kill . . . whom? the meaning of the person -- Capital punishment: the case for justice -- Constitution vs. constitutionalism -- Constitutional metaphysics -- The liberal, illiberal religion.
     
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  7. Stefan Kirchner (2013). Natural Law as Biolaw. Jurisprudence 20 (1):23-39.score: 426.0
    This article investigates the use of natural law in biolaw from the specific perspective of an attorney practising before the European Court of Human Rights. Starting from an exploration of the question of who is a human and thereby to be protected under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), particular emphasis is placed on the right to life under Art. 2(1) ECHR. It is shown that natural law can – and should – impact the interpretation of the (...)
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  8. Svend Andersen (2001). Theological Ethics, Moral Philosophy, and Natural Law. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (4):349-364.score: 306.3
    The article deals with the relationship between theological ethics and moral philosophy. The former is seen as a theoretical reflection on Christian ethics, the latter as one on secular ethics. The main questions asked are: (1) Is there one and only one pre-theoretical knowledge about acting rightly? (2) Does philosophy provide us with the theoretical framework for understanding both Christian and secular ethics? Both questions are answered in the negative. In the course of argument, four positions are presented: theological unificationism, (...)
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  9. Timothy Stanton (2008). Hobbes and Locke on Natural Law and Jesus Christ. History of Political Thought 29 (1):65-88.score: 297.0
    The charge of Hobbism assumes a prominent position in some accounts of Locke's thought. This essay argues that the charge is misconceived, not least because it fails to appreciate the true character of Hobbes's thinking and its relation to Locke's. Hobbes's architectonic retains the traditional intellectual structure of natural law thinking, articulating it around the demands of his metaphysics in ways important for his political theory. Locke decisively rejects this structure and in doing so opens up the conceptual space (...)
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  10. Rufus Black (2000). Christian Moral Realism: Natural Law, Narrative, Virtue, and the Gospel. Oxford University Press.score: 292.0
    This book describes the shape of a Christian ethic that arises from a conversation between contemporary accounts of natural law theory, and virtue ethics. The ethic that emerges from this conversation seeks to resolve the tensions in Christian ethics between creation and eschatology, narrative and natural law, and objectivity and relativity. Black moves from this analytic foundation to conclude that worship lies at the heart of a theologically grounded ethic whose central concern is the flourishing of the whole (...)
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  11. Martin Rhonheimer (2000). Natural Law and Practical Reason: A Thomist View of Moral Autonomy. Fordham University Press.score: 291.3
    Rhonheimer applies moral theology to practical questions, such as, what does it mean to violate the natural law, or to be “unnatural”?
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  12. David S. Oderberg & T. D. J. Chappell (eds.) (2004). Human Values: New Essays on Ethics and Natural Law. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 291.3
    In recent decades, the revival of natural law theory in modern moral philosophy has been an exciting and important development. Human Values brings together an international group of moral philosophers who in various respects share the aims and ideals of natural law ethics. In their diverse ways, these authors make distinctive and original contributions to the continuing project of developing natural law ethics as a comprehensive treatment of modern ethical theory and practice.
     
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  13. J. Daryl Charles (2008). Retrieving the Natural Law: A Return to Moral First Things. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..score: 276.3
    Introduction -- Contending for moral first things : Christian social ethics and postconsensus culture -- Natural law and the Christian tradition -- Natural law and the Protestant prejudice -- Moral law, Christian belief, and social ethics -- Contending for moral first things in ethical and bioethical debates : critical categories, part 1 -- Contending for moral first things in ethical and bioethical debates : critical categories, part 2 -- Ethics, bioethics, and the natural law, a (...)
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  14. Douglas Kries (2007). The Problem of Natural Law. Lexington Books.score: 276.3
    Conscience in Thomas's understanding of natural law -- The objections of the ancient philosophers -- The objections of the Calvinist christians -- On the possibility of revising Thomas's teaching on conscience -- Those who deny the existence of human nature -- Those who deny the moral relevancy of human nature -- Those who deny the ancient understanding of human nature.
     
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  15. Anthony J. Lisska (1996). Aquinas's Theory of Natural Law: An Analytic Reconstrution. Oxford University Press.score: 276.3
    Aquinas needs no introduction as one of the greatest minds of the middle ages. Highly influential on the development of Christian doctrine, his ideas are still of fundamental philosophical importance. This new critique of his natural law theory discusses the theory's background in Aristotle and advances new interpretations of contemporary legal issues which hark back to Aquinas.
     
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  16. Adam S. Francisco (2011). Natural Law : A Basis for Christian : Muslim Civil Discourse? In Robert C. Baker & Roland Cap Ehlke (eds.), Natural Law: A Lutheran Reappraisal. Concordia Pub. House.score: 271.0
     
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  17. B. H. Woo (2012). Pannenberg's Understanding of the Natural Law. Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (3):346-366.score: 264.3
    The ethics of Wolfhart Pannenberg has a nomological dimension at its center. Based on the history of the natural law tradition, Pannenberg maintains the possibility of the natural law theory on the following five grounds. -/- The theological ground is his understanding of the Decalogue, the Sermon on the Mount, and the Pauline interpretation of the law. For its historical ground, Pannenberg articulates the natural law theories of Patristic theology and the theologies of Troeltsch and Brunner. The (...)
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  18. Thomas K. Johnson (2005). Natural Law Ethics: An Evangelical Proposal. Verlag für Kultur Und Wissenschaft.score: 258.7
     
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  19. William Atwell Spurrier (1974). Natural Law and the Ethics of Love. Philadelphia,Westminster Press.score: 258.7
     
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  20. J. M. DuBois (2008). Christian Versus Philosophical Natural Law Reasoning: Reply to Joseph Boyle. Christian Bioethics 14 (3):310-313.score: 241.3
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  21. James M. DuBois (2008). Christian Versus Philosophical Natural Law Reasoning: Reply to Joseph Boyle. Christian Bioethics 14 (3):310-313.score: 241.3
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  22. G. Haas (2003). Book Review: Christian Moral Realism: Natural Law, Narrative, Virtue, and the Gospel. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (2):93-96.score: 241.3
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  23. David VanDrunen (2013). Wisdom and the Natural Moral Order: The Contribution of Proverbs to a Christian Theology of Natural Law. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 33 (1):153-168.score: 241.3
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  24. Stephen J. Pope (2001). Natural Law and Christian Ethics. In Robin Gill (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 241.3
     
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  25. Kevin McNamara (1954). Miracle and Natural Law in Graeco-Roman and Early Christian Thought. Philosophical Studies 4:95-97.score: 238.3
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  26. Giuseppe Butera (2007). The First Grace: Rediscovering the Natural Law in a Post-Christian World. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):671-674.score: 238.3
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  27. S. L. Greenslade (1954). Robert M. Grant: Miracle and Natural Law in Graeco-Roman and Early Christian Thought. Pp. 296; 2 Plates. The Classical Review 4 (3-4):308-309.score: 238.3
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  28. Joan Lockwood O'Donovan (1998). Natural Law and Perfect Community: Contributions of Christian Platonism to Political Theory. Modern Theology 14 (1):19-42.score: 238.3
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  29. John R. Carnes (1967). Christian Ethics and Natural Law. Religious Studies 3 (1):301 - 311.score: 238.3
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  30. G. Ambrosetti (1971). Christian Natural Law the Spirit and Method Of. American Journal of Jurisprudence 16 (1):290-301.score: 238.3
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  31. Thomas C. Berg (2006). John Courtney Murray and Reinhold Niebuhr: Natural Law and Christian Realism. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 3:05-20.score: 238.3
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  32. D. Robinson (2005). Rufus Black: Christian Moral Realism: Natural Law, Narrative, Virtue, and the Gospel. Faith and Philosophy 22 (1).score: 238.3
     
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  33. David Novak (2012). Defending Niebuhr From Hauerwas. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):281-295.score: 231.0
    In his 2001 book, With the Grain of the Universe, Stanley Hauerwas has made an extended case for Karl Barth as the model for how to do Christian ethics, and for Reinhold Niebuhr as the model for how not to do it. Though Barth's closer and deeper theological connection to the Christian tradition appeals to a Jewish traditionalist by analogy, nevertheless, Niebuhr's approach to social ethics, based as it is on a version of natural law, is of greater appeal. (...)
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  34. Thom Brooks (2007). Between Natural Law and Legal Positivism: Dworkin and Hegel on Legal Theory. Georgia State University Law Review 23 (3):513-60.score: 230.0
    In this article, I argue that - despite the absence of any clear influence of one theory on the other - the legal theories of Dworkin and Hegel share several similar and, at times, unique positions that join them together within a distinctive school of legal theory, sharing a middle position between natural law and legal positivism. In addition, each theory can help the other in addressing certain internal difficulties. By recognizing both Hegel and Dworkin as proponents of a (...)
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  35. Laing (2012). The Connection Between Law and Justice in the Natural Law Tradition. In Nick Spencer (ed.), Religion and Law. London, Theos.score: 226.0
    Law, we are told, is a system of rules, created by men to govern human behaviour. Students of law, introduced to legal systems, become familiar with varied sources of law – legislative, judicial and executive in character. There are undoubtedly prescriptive human rules that govern men set up by public authorities that are advertised as being for the common good. These appear as visible, socially constructed systems in different jurisdictions and even as international systems across jurisdictions. But is this all (...)
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  36. Craig Paterson (2010). Review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW] Ethics and Medicine 26 (1):23-4.score: 224.0
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just (...)
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  37. Mark C. Murphy (2006). Natural Law in Jurisprudence and Politics. Cambridge University Press.score: 224.0
    Natural law is a perennial though poorly represented and understood issue in political philosophy and the philosophy of law. Mark C. Murphy argues that the central thesis of natural law jurisprudence--that law is backed by decisive reasons for compliance--sets the agenda for natural law political philosophy, which demonstrates how law gains its binding force by way of the common good of the political community. Murphy's work ranges over the central questions of natural law jurisprudence and political (...)
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  38. Stephen Buckle (1991). Natural Law and the Theory of Property: Grotius to Hume. Oxford University Press.score: 224.0
    In this book, Buckle provides a historical perspective on the political philosophies of Locke and Hume, arguing that there are continuities in the development of seventeenth and eighteenth-century political theory which have often gone unrecognized. He begins with a detailed exposition of Grotius's and Pufendorf's modern natural law theory, focussing on their accounts of the nature of natural law, human sociability, the development of forms of property, and the question of slavery. He then shows that Locke's political theory (...)
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  39. Craig Paterson (2001). The Contribution of Natural Law Theory to Moral and Legal Debate Concerning Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Universal Publishers.score: 224.0
    Chapter one argues for the important contribution that a natural law based framework can make towards an analysis and assessment of key controversies surrounding the practices of suicide, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia. The second chapter considers a number of historical contributions to the debate. The third chapter takes up the modern context of ideas that have increasingly come to the fore in shaping the 'push' for reform. Particular areas focused upon include the value of human life, the value (...)
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  40. Yves René Marie Simon (1965/1992). The Tradition of Natural Law: A Philosopher's Reflections. Fordham University Press.score: 224.0
    The tradition of natural law is one of the foundations of Western civilization. At its heart is the conviction that there is an objective and universal justice which transcends humanity’s particular expressions of justice. It asserts that there are certain ways of behaving which are appropriate to humanity simply by virtue of the fact that we are all human beings. Recent political debates indicate that it is not a tradition that has gone unchallenged: in fact, the opposition is as (...)
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  41. Robert P. George (ed.) (1992). Natural Law Theory: Contemporary Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 224.0
    Natural law theory is enjoying a revival of interest in a variety of scholarly disciplines including law, philosophy, political science, and theology and religious studies. This volume presents twelve original essays by leading natural law theorists and their critics. The contributors discuss natural law theories of morality, law and legal reasoning, politics, and the rule of law. Readers get a clear sense of the wide diversity of viewpoints represented among contemporary theorists, and an opportunity to evaluate the (...)
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  42. T. J. Hochstrasser (2000). Natural Law Theories in the Early Enlightenment. Cambridge University Press.score: 224.0
    This major addition to Ideas in Context examines the development of natural law theories in the early stages of the Enlightenment in Germany and France. T. J. Hochstrasser investigates the influence exercised by theories of natural law from Grotius to Kant, with a comparative analysis of the important intellectual innovations in ethics and political philosophy of the time. Hochstrasser includes the writings of Samuel Pufendorf and his followers who evolved a natural law theory based on human sociability (...)
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  43. Michael Cuffaro (2011). On Thomas Hobbes's Fallible Natural Law Theory. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (2):175-190.score: 224.0
    It is not clear, on the face of it, whether Thomas Hobbes's legal philosophy should be considered to be an early example of legal positivism or continuous with the natural-law tradition. On the one hand, Hobbes's command theory of law seems characteristically positivistic. On the other hand, his conception of the "law of nature," as binding on both sovereign and subject, seems to point more naturally toward a natural-law reading of his philosophy. Yet despite this seeming ambiguity, Hobbes (...)
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  44. Ellen Frankel, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (2000). Natural Law and Modern Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 224.0
    These essays address some of the most intriguing questions raised by natural law theory and its implications for law, morality, and public policy. some of the essays explore the implications that natural law theory has for jurisprudence, asking what natural law suggests about the use of legal devices such as constitutions and precedents. Other essays examine the connections between natural law and various political concepts, such as citizens' rights and the obligation of citizens to obey their (...)
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  45. T. J. Hochstrasser & Peter Schröder (eds.) (2003). Early Modern Natural Law Theories: Contexts and Strategies in Early Enlightenment. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 224.0
    The study of natural law theories is presently one of the most fruitful areas of research in the studies of early modern intellectual history, and moral and political theory. Likewise the historical significance of the Enlightenment for the development of `modernisation' in many different forms continues to be the subject of controversy. This collection therefore offers a timely opportunity to re-examine both the coherence of the concept of an `early Enlightenment', and the specific contribution of natural law theories (...)
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  46. Alfonso Gómez-Lobo (2002). Morality and the Human Goods: An Introduction to Natural Law Ethics. Georgetown University Press.score: 224.0
    A concise and accessible introduction to natural law ethics, this book introduces readers to the mainstream tradition of Western moral philosophy.
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  47. Robert P. George (ed.) (1996). Natural Law, Liberalism, and Morality: Contemporary Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 224.0
    This work brings together leading defenders of Natural Law and Liberalism for a series of frank and lively exchanges touching upon critical issues of contemporary moral and political theory. The book is an outstanding example of the fruitful engagement of traditions of thought about fundamental matters of ethics and justice.
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  48. J. J. Burlamaqui (1748/2004). The Principles of Natural Law: In Which the True Systems of Morality and Civil Government Are Established, and the Different Sentiments of Grotius, Hobbes, Puffendorf, Barbeyrac, Locke, Clark, and Hutchinson, Occasionally Considered. Lawbook Exchange.score: 224.0
  49. Edmund Wall (2008). Searle's Derivation, Natural Law, and Moral Relativism. Philosophia 36 (2):237-249.score: 224.0
    Some philosophers have maintained that even if John R. Searle’s attempted derivation of an evaluative proposition from purely descriptive premises is successful, moral ought would not have been derived. Searle agrees. I will argue that if Searle has successfully derived “ought,” then, based on various approaches taken towards the content of “morality,” this is moral ought. I will also trace out some of the benefits of a successful derivation of moral ought in relation to natural law ethics. I sketch (...)
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  50. Francesco Fagiani (1983). Natural Law and History in Locke's Theory of Distributive Justice. Topoi 2 (2):163-185.score: 224.0
    According to the tradition of natural law justice is inherent to, and should always be observed in, all interpersonal relations: the science of natural law is nothing more or less than the expression of such principles of justice. The theoretical peculiarities that crop up regarding the lawfulness of appropriation are determined by the indirect interpersonal relations that take place within the process of appropriation: though appropriation is an action directed not towards another person or his property, but towards (...)
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