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  1. added 2018-12-27
    Aristotle on the Good Man’s Desire for Pleasant Friends.Andreas Vakirtzis - 2018 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 12 (2):74-88.
  2. added 2018-07-28
    Habituation as Mimesis.Hallvard J. Fossheim - 2006 - In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  3. added 2018-06-21
    Review of Warren, The Pleasures of Reason Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists. [REVIEW]Tim O'Keefe - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  4. added 2018-02-26
    II—More Aristotelian Pleasures.J. Gosling - 1974 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74 (1):15-34.
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  5. added 2018-02-19
    Pleasure in Aristotle’s Ethics. [REVIEW]Erick Raphael Jiménez - 2008 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 29 (1):277-281.
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  6. added 2018-01-11
    Review of Gosling and Taylor, The Greeks on Pleasure. [REVIEW]Didier Pralon - 1986 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 176 (4):504-506.
  7. added 2017-12-04
    The Functions of Pleasure in Nicomachean Ethics X 4-5.Peter Hadreas - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):155-167.
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  8. added 2017-12-04
    Aristotle’s Simile of Pleasure at NE 1174b33.Peter Hadreas - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (2):371-374.
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  9. added 2017-11-27
    Pleasure, Tragedy and Aristotelian Psychology.Elizabeth Belfiore - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (2):349-361.
    Aristotle's Rhetoric defines fear as a kind of pain or disturbance and pity as a kind of pain. In his Poetics, however, pity and fear are associated with pleasure: ‘ The poet must provide the pleasure that comes from pity and fear by means of imitation’. The question of the relationship between pleasure and pain in Aristotle's aesthetics has been studied primarily in connection with catharsis. Catharsis, however, raises more problems than it solves. Aristotle says nothing at all about the (...)
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  10. added 2017-09-19
    Processes as Pleasures in EN Vii 11-14: A New Approach.Joachim Aufderheide - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):135-157.
  11. added 2017-06-09
    Protrepticus. Aristotle, Monte Ransome Johnson & D. S. Hutchinson - manuscript
    A new translation and edition of Aristotle's Protrepticus (with critical comments on the fragments) -/- Welcome -/- The Protrepticus was an early work of Aristotle, written while he was still a member of Plato's Academy, but it soon became one of the most famous works in the whole history of philosophy. Unfortunately it was not directly copied in the middle ages and so did not survive in its own manuscript tradition. But substantial fragments of it have been preserved in several (...)
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  12. added 2017-03-30
    Aristotle on Similarity, Pleasure, and the Justification of Our Choices of Friends.Vakirtzis Andreas - manuscript
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  13. added 2017-02-16
    Pleasure as Perfection: Nicomachean Ethics X.4-5.Strohl Matthew - 2011 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 41:257-287.
    I argue that Aristotle took pleasure to be a certain aspect of perfect activities of awareness, namely, their very perfection. I also argue that this reading facilitates an attractive interpretation of his view that pleasures differ in kind along with the activities they arise in connection with.
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  14. added 2017-02-13
    Pleasure.Cory Wimberly - 2015 - In Blackwell Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Chichester: Blackwell. pp. 2716-2720.
    The history of the political thought on pleasure is not a cloistered affair in which scholars only engage one another. In political thought, one commonly finds a critical engagement with the wider public and the ruling classes, which are both perceived to be dangerously hedonistic. The effort of many political thinkers is directed towards showing that other political ends are more worthy than pleasure: Plato battles vigorously against Calicles' pleasure seeking in the Gorgias, Augustine argues in The City of God (...)
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  15. added 2017-01-31
    NOTES ON NICOMACHEAN ETHICS 1173a2–5.Grönroos Gösta - 2016 - Classical Quarterly 66 (2):484–490.
    In Nicomachean Ethics (= Eth. Nic.) 10.2, Aristotle addresses Eudoxus’ argument that pleasure is the chief good in his characteristically dialectical manner. The argument is that pleasure is the chief good, since all creatures, rational (ἔλλογα) and non-rational (ἄλογα) alike, are perceived to aim at pleasure (1172b9–11).1 At 1172b35–1173a5, Aristotle turns to an objection against Eudoxus’ argument. For some object (οἱ δ᾽ἐνιστάμενοι) to the argument by questioning one of its premisses, namely that what all creatures aim at is the good (...)
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  16. added 2017-01-06
    The Limits of Eudaimonia in the Nicomachean Ethics.Schwartz Daniel - 2016 - Journal of Greco-Roman Studies 55 (3):35-52.
    In Book I of his Nicomachean Ethics (NE), Aristotle defines happiness, or eudaimonia, in accordance with an argument he makes regarding the distinctive function of human beings. In this paper, I argue that, despite this argument, there are moments in the NE where Aristotle appeals to elements of happiness that don’t follow from the function argument itself. The place of these elements in Aristotle’s account of happiness should, therefore, be a matter of perplexity. For, how can Aristotle appeal to elements (...)
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  17. added 2016-12-08
    Rediscovering the Sense of Pleasure in Morality.M. Lorenz Moises J. Festin - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:101-108.
    Pleasure has always been an important issue in morality. And although ethical systems tend to focus the discussion on human action, this agreeable sentiment has remained a recurrent question in moral philosophy. In this paper, I go back to Aristotle’s treatment of pleasure in his writings, particularly in the Nicomachean Ethics. I will argue that the distinction he draws between bodily pleasures and those of the mind represents an important point not only in understanding eudaimonia but also in situating the (...)
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  18. added 2016-12-08
    Aristotle's Definition of Pleasure: A Refutation of the Platonic Account.Gerd Van Riel - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):119-138.
  19. added 2016-12-08
    Pleasure and the Two Happinesses in Aristotle.Martin A. Bertman - 1972 - Apeiron 6 (2):30 - 36.
  20. added 2016-05-12
    What Aristotelian Decisions Cannot Be.Jozef Müller - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):173-195.
    I argue that Aristotelian decisions (προαιρέσεις) cannot be conceived of as based solely on wish (βούλησις) and deliberation (βούλευσις), as the standard picture (most influentially argued for in Anscombe's "Thought and Action in Aristotle", in R. Bambrough ed. New Essays on Plato and Aristotle. London: Routledge, 1965) suggests. Although some features of the standard view are correct (such as that decisions have essential connection to deliberation and that wish always plays a crucial role in the formation of a decision), Aristotelian (...)
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  21. added 2016-01-15
    Aristotle on “Steering the Young by Pleasure and Pain”.Marta Jimenez - 2015 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (2):137-164.
    At least since Burnyeat’s “Aristotle on Learning to Be Good,” one of the most popular ways of explaining moral development in Aristotle is by appealing to mechanisms of pleasure and pain. Aristotle himself suggests this kind of explanation when he says that “in educating the young we steer them by the rudders of pleasure and pain” (Nicomachean Ethics X.1, 1172a21). However, I argue that, contrary to the dominant view, Aristotle’s view on moral development in the Nicomachean Ethics is not mainly (...)
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  22. added 2015-12-05
    Mimesis, Friendship, and Moral Development in Aristotle’s Ethics.Andreas Vakirtzis - 2015 - Rhizomata 3 (2):125-142.
    The significance of imitation for moral development during childhood, in Aristotle’s ethics, has been recognized and studied. However, what role does imitation play in the morally mature agent’s character development? In this paper, I argue that moral development is possible for the advanced moral agent, when she imitates her character-friend. But the mature agent’s imitation is of a thoroughly different type than the imitation of the young moral agent; the mature imitation mechanism is selective and interpretative. The agent selects from (...)
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  23. added 2015-09-29
    David Wolfsdorf: Pleasure in Ancient Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]John Garner - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (2):462-467.
  24. added 2015-07-11
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.James Warren - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Human lives are full of pleasures and pains. And humans are creatures that are able to think: to learn, understand, remember and recall, plan and anticipate. Ancient philosophers were interested in both of these facts and, what is more, were interested in how these two facts are related to one another. There appear to be, after all, pleasures and pains associated with learning and inquiring, recollecting and anticipating. We enjoy finding something out. We are pained to discover that a belief (...)
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  25. added 2015-05-11
    Getting Serious About Seriousness: On the Meaning of Spoudaios in Aristotle’s Ethics.Mathew Lu - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:285-293.
    In the following paper I discuss the under-appreciated role that the concept of the morally serious person plays in Aristotle’s moral philosophy. I argue that the conventional English rendering of spoudaios as “good” has a tendency to cut us off from important nuances in Aristotle’s consideration of the virtuous person. After discussing aspects of his use of the concept in the Nicomachean Ethics and the Politics I dismiss a misunderstanding of seriousness as a kind of morally indifferent personality trait. I (...)
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  26. added 2015-04-27
    Aristotle's Forbidden Sweets.James Bogen & J. M. E. Moravcsik - 1982 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (2):111-127.
  27. added 2015-04-25
    The Nicomachean Ethics on Pleasure.Verity Harte - 2014 - In Ronald Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 288-318.
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  28. added 2015-03-23
    Aristotle on Pleasure.Robert Scott Stewart - 1990 - Auslegung 16 (1):97-108.
    Aristotle provides two extended discussions on the subject of pleasure within the Nicomachean Ethics. The first, which comprises the last four chapters of Book 7, produces a definition of pleasure in which pleasure is identified with activity (energeia). But in the second discussion of pleasure—provided in the first five chapters of Book 10-this position is characterized as "strange" or "absurd" (1175b 35). Instead of an identification between the two, pleasure is now said to "supervene" upon activity "as the bloom of (...)
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  29. added 2015-03-07
    Aristotle on Actions From Lack of Control.Jozef Müller - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    The paper defends three claims about Aristotle’s theory of uncontrolled actions (akrasia) in NE 7.3. First, I argue that the first part of NE 7.3 contains the description of the overall state of mind of the agent while she acts without control. Aristotle’s solution to the problem of uncontrolled action lies in the analogy between the uncontrolled agent and people who are drunk, mad, or asleep. This analogy is interpreted as meaning that the uncontrolled agent, while acting without control, is (...)
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  30. added 2015-02-23
    Aristotle on Pleasure: Reconciling Three Different Accounts.Mary K. Ducey - 1992 - Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    "Its difficulty, astonishingly, reduced Aristotle to babble." Thus G. E. M. Anscombe refers to dealing with pleasure in a philosophical way. Anscombe is not alone in criticizing Aristotle in this area: Ryle, Cope, and Ackrill have also claimed that his writings on pleasure are inconsistent. It has been a well-known and often considered problem: Book VII of the Nicomachean Ethics defines 'pleasure' as the equivalent of an energeia, an activity which requires nothing else to complete or perfect it, while Book (...)
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  31. added 2015-02-23
    Ethical Pleasure: Aristotle's Two Treatments of Pleasure in the "Nicomachean Ethics".Betty J. Connelly - 1987 - Dissertation, Duquesne University
    This thesis' objective is an understanding of Aristotle's two quite different treatments of pleasure in the Nicomachean Ethics. Both treatments have implications for understanding human action and the role of pleasure in the good life. The thesis shows that differences in the treatments are resolvable if, first, an independent common basis for an Aristotelian notion of pleasure is developed and then the contexts of the passages are considered. ;The De Anima's exposition of locomotion as the characteristic activity of the sensient (...)
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  32. added 2015-02-23
    The Treatment of Pleasure and Pain in Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics".Donald Charles Lindenmuth - 1981 - Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    The Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle contains two treatises on pleasure and pain, which present different positions on the nature of pleasure and its relation to the supreme good for man. Contrary to the standard approach, which accounts for these differences by assigning these treatises to different periods of Aristotle's philosophical development, I trace their differences to the general thematic development of the Ethics as a whole. This is achieved by an analysis of the themes of pleasure and pain and their (...)
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  33. added 2014-07-17
    The Greeks on Pleasure.J. C. B. Gosling & C. C. W. Taylor - 1982 - Oxford University Press.
    Provides a critical and analytical history of ancient Greek theories on the nature of pleasure, and of its value and rolein human lfie, from the ealriest times down to the period of Epicurus and the early Stoics.
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  34. added 2014-03-17
    Like the Bloom on Youths: How Pleasure Completes Our Lives.Johan Brannmark - 2006 - In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  35. added 2013-04-18
    Pleasure and Activity in Aristotle's Ethics.David Bostock - 1988 - Phronesis 33 (1):251-272.
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  36. added 2013-03-31
    Aristotle's Doctrine on Pleasure Godo Lieberg: Die Lehre von der Lust in den Ethiken des Aristoteles. (Zetemata, Heft 19.) Pp. 130. Munich: Beck, 1958. Paper, DM. 15. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1960 - The Classical Review 10 (02):118-120.
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  37. added 2013-03-30
    Aristotle’s Measure Doctrine and Pleasure.Paula Gottlieb - 1993 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 75 (1):31-46.
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  38. added 2013-03-30
    More Aristotelian Pleasures.J. Gosling - 1973 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74:15 - 34.
    FIRST A CRITIQUE OF G E L OWEN'S VERSION OF THE CONTRAST BETWEEN BOOKS VII AND X OF THE NICOMACHEAN ETHICS. IT IS ARGUED THAT BOTH BOOKS ARE OFFERING SIMILAR ACCOUNTS OF THE NATURE OF PLEASURE, WHICH OFFER GENERAL CONDITIONS FOR THE OCCURRENCE OF PLEASURE. HOWEVER, ARISTOTLE IS INTERESTED IN 'REAL' PLEASURE, WHICH IS RELATED TO THE NATURE OF THE RELEVANT BEING. ONLY BY IMPLICATION DOES HE GIVE A GENERAL ACCOUNT OF PLEASURE. THE BOOK X VERSION ENABLES HIM TO HAVE (...)
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  39. added 2013-03-30
    Father Kenny on False Pleasures.J. Gosling - 1961 - Phronesis 6 (1):41-45.
  40. added 2013-03-29
    Aristotle on Pleasure and Perfection.Francisco Gonzalez - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (2):141-159.