162 found
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  1.  95
    The Evolution of Modern Metaphysics: Making Sense of Things.A. W. Moore - 2011 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book is concerned with the history of metaphysics since Descartes. Taking as its definition of metaphysics 'the most general attempt to make sense of things', it charts the evolution of this enterprise through various competing conceptions of its possibility, scope, and limits. The book is divided into three parts, dealing respectively with the early modern period, the late modern period in the analytic tradition, and the late modern period in non-analytic traditions. In its unusually wide range, A. W. Moore's (...)
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  2.  76
    Kantian Humility: Our Ignorance of Things in Themselves.A. W. Moore - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):117.
    Kant once wrote, “Many historians of philosophy... let the philosophers speak mere nonsense.... They cannot see beyond what the philosophers actually said to what they really meant to say.’ Rae Langton begins her book with this quotation. She concludes it, after a final pithy summary of the position that she attributes to Kant, with the comment, “That, it seems to me, is what Kant said, and meant to say”. In between are some two hundred pages of admirably clear, tightly argued (...)
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  3.  45
    Points of View.A. W. Moore - 1997 - Oxford, GB: Clarendon Press.
    A. W. Moore argues in this bold and unusual book that it is possible to think about the world from no point of view. His argument involves discussion of a very wide range of fundamental philosophical issues, including the nature of persons, the subject-matter of mathematics, realism and anti-realism, value, the inexpressible, and God. The result is a powerful critique of our own finitude. 'imaginative, original, and ambitious' Robert Brandom, Times Literary Supplement.
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  4. The Infinite.A. W. MOORE - 1990 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 182 (3):355-357.
     
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  5.  30
    Language, World, and Limits: Essays in the Philosophy of Language and Metaphysics.A. W. Moore - 2019 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    A.W. Moore presents eighteen of his philosophical essays, written since 1986, on representing how things are. He sketches out the nature, scope, and limits of representation through language, and pays particular attention to linguistic representation, states of knowledge, the character of what is represented, and objective facts or truths.
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  6.  39
    The Infinite.Janet Folina & A. W. Moore - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):348.
    Anyone who has pondered the limitlessness of space and time, or the endlessness of numbers, or the perfection of God will recognize the special fascination of this question. Adrian Moore's historical study of the infinite covers all its aspects, from the mathematical to the mystical.
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  7.  44
    The View From Nowhere.A. W. Moore - 1987 - Philosophical Quarterly 37 (148):323-327.
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  8.  49
    Towards a New Philosophical Imaginary.A. W. Moore, Sabina Lovibond & Pamela Sue Anderson - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):8-22.
    The paper builds on the postulate of “myths we live by,” which shape our imaginative life (and hence our social expectations), but which are also open to reflective study and reinvention. It applies this principle, in particular, to the concepts of love and vulnerability. We are accustomed to think of the condition of vulnerability in an objectifying and distancing way, as something that affects the bearers of specific (disadvantaged) social identities. Against this picture, which can serve as a pretext for (...)
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  9. Points of View.A. W. Moore - 1999 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 189 (3):401-401.
     
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  10. Points of View.A. W. Moore - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (288):291-295.
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  11. Maxims and thick ethical concepts.A. W. Moore - 2006 - Ratio 19 (2):129–147.
    I begin with Kant's notion of a maxim and consider the role which this notion plays in Kant's formulations of the fundamental categorical imperative. This raises the question of what a maxim is, and why there is not the same requirement for resolutions of other kinds to be universalizable. Drawing on Bernard Williams' notion of a thick ethical concept, I proffer an answer to this question which is intended neither in a spirit of simple exegesis nor as a straightforward exercise (...)
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  12. Ineffability and nonsense.A. W. Moore - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):169–193.
    [A. W. Moore] Criteria of ineffability are presented which, it is claimed, preclude the possibility of truths that are ineffable, but not the possibility of other things that are ineffable—not even the possibility of other things that are non-trivially ineffable. Specifically, they do not preclude the possibility of states of understanding that are ineffable. This, it is argued, allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and those who adopt the new (...)
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  13.  43
    Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty: Themes and Variations in Kant's Moral and Religious Philosophy.A. W. Moore - 2003 - New York: Routledge.
    In this bold and innovative new work, A.W. Moore poses the question of whether it is possible for ethical thinking to be grounded in pure reason. In order to understand and answer this question, he takes a refreshing and challenging look at Kant’s moral and religious philosophy. Identifying three Kantian Themes – morality, freedom and religion – and presenting variations on each of these themes in turn, Moore concedes that there are difficulties with the Kantian view that morality can be (...)
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  14. Points of View.A. W. Moore - 2000 - Mind 109 (433):166-170.
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  15.  57
    Was the author of the Tractatus a transcendental idealist?A. W. Moore - 2013 - In Peter M. Sullivan & Michael D. Potter (eds.), Wittgenstein's Tractatus: history and interpretation. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 239.
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  16.  12
    The Infinite: Third Edition.A. W. Moore - 2018 - Routledge.
    This third edition of The Infinite includes a new part 'Infinity Superseded' which contains two new chapters refining Moore's ideas through a re-examination of the ideas of Spinoza, Hegel, and Nietzsche. Much of this is heavily influenced by the work of Deleuze. There is also a new technical appendix on still unresolved issues about different infinite sizes.
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  17. Transcendental idealism in Wittgenstein, and theories of meaning.A. W. Moore - 1985 - Philosophical Quarterly 35 (139):134-155.
    This essay involves exploration of certain repercussions of Bernard Williams’ view that there is, in Wittgenstein’s later work, a transcendental idealism akin to that found in the Tractatus—sharing with it the feature that it cannot be satisfactorily stated. It is argued that, if Williams is right, then Wittgenstein’s later work precludes a philosophically substantial theory of meaning; for such a theory would force us to try to state the idealism. In a postscript written for the reprint of the essay, reasons (...)
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  18.  16
    Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline.A. W. Moore (ed.) - 2006 - Princeton University Press.
    What can--and what can't--philosophy do? What are its ethical risks--and its possible rewards? How does it differ from science? In Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline, Bernard Williams addresses these questions and presents a striking vision of philosophy as fundamentally different from science in its aims and methods even though there is still in philosophy "something that counts as getting it right." Written with his distinctive combination of rigor, imagination, depth, and humanism, the book amply demonstrates why Williams was one of (...)
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  19.  23
    Replies.A. W. Moore - 2015 - Philosophical Topics 43 (1-2):329-383.
    I am enormously grateful to everyone who has contributed to this double issue of Philosophical Topics, to Manuel Dries and Joseph Schear for conceiving the issue and initiating the process of inviting contributions, and to Ed Minar and Jack Lyons, former editor and current editor of the journal respectively, for their excellent work in bringing the issue into existence. Each contribution displays a level of engagement with my book1 that would have been gratifying even if the contribution had been confined (...)
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  20. How significant is the use/mention distinction?A. W. Moore - 1986 - Analysis 46 (4):173-179.
    It is argued that the use/mention distinction, if it is to be a clear-cut one, cannot have the significance that it is usually thought to have. For that significance attaches to the distinction between employing an expression in order to draw attention to, or to talk about, some aspect of the world, as determined by the expression’s meaning, and employing it in order to draw attention to, or to talk about, the expression itself—and this distinction is not a clear-cut one. (...)
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  21. The possibility of absolute representations.A. W. Moore - 2023 - In James Conant & Jesse M. Mulder (eds.), Reading Rödl: on Self-consciousness and objectivity. New York, NY: Routledge.
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  22.  56
    Wittgenstein and transcendental idealism.A. W. Moore - 2007 - In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 174--199.
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  23.  4
    More on Williams on Ethical Knowledge and Reflection.A. W. Moore - 2024 - Topoi 43 (2):381-386.
    This essay is concerned with Bernard Williams’ contention in Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy that, in ethics, reflection can destroy knowledge. I attempt to defend this contention from the charge of incoherence. I do this by taking seriously the idea that ethical knowledge is knowledge from an ethical point of view. There nevertheless remains an issue about whether the contention is consistent with ideas elsewhere in Williams’ own work, in particular with what he says about knowledge in Descartes. In (...)
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  24.  91
    Aspects of the infinite in Kant.A. W. Moore - 1988 - Mind 97 (386):205-223.
  25. Apperception and the Unreality of Tense.A. W. Moore - 2001 - In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (eds.), Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. pp. 375-391.
    The aim of this essay is to characterize the issue whether tense is real. Roughly, this is the issue whether, given any tensed representation, its tense corresponds in some suitably direct way to some feature of reality. The task is to make this less rough. Eight characterizations of the issue are considered and rejected, before one is endorsed. On this characterization, the unreality of tense is equivalent to the unity of temporal reality. The issue whether tense is real, so characterized, (...)
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  26. Ineffability and religion.A. W. Moore - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (2):161–176.
    It is argued that, although there are no ineffable truths, the concept of ineffability nevertheless does have application—to certain states of knowledge. Towards the end of the essay this idea is related to religion: it is argued that the language that results from attempting (unsuccessfully) to put ineffable knowledge into words is very often of a religious kind. An example of this is given at the very end of the essay. This example concerns the Euthyphro question: whether what is right (...)
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  27. The transcendental doctrine of method.A. W. Moore - 2010 - In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Cambridge University Press.
  28.  72
    Arguing with Derrida.A. W. Moore - 2000 - Ratio 13 (4):355–386.
  29.  49
    Meaning and reference.A. W. Moore (ed.) - 1993 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents a selection of the most important writings in the debate on the nature of meaning and reference which started one hundred years ago with Frege's classic essay "On Sense and Reference." Contributors include Bertrand Russell, P.F. Strawson, W.V. Quine, Donald Davidson, John McDowell, Michael Dummett, Hilary Putnam, Saul Kripke, David Wiggins, and Gareth Evans. The aim of this series is to bring together important recent writings in major areas of philosophical inquiry, selected from a wide variety of (...)
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  30.  76
    A Problem for Intuitionism: The Apparent Possibility of Performing Infinitely Many Tasks in a Finite Time.A. W. Moore - 1990 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 90:17 - 34.
    A. W. Moore; II*—A Problem for Intuitionism: The Apparent Possibility of Performing Infinitely Many Tasks in a Finite Time, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Soci.
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  31. On Saying and Showing: A. W. Moore.A. W. Moore - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (242):473 - 497.
    This essay constitutes an attempt to probe the very idea of a saying/showing distinction of the kind that Wittgenstein advances in the Tractatus—to say what such a distinction consists in, to say what philosophical work it has to do, and to say how we might be justified in drawing such a distinction. Towards the end of the essay the discussion is related to Wittgenstein’s later work. It is argued that we can profitably see this work in such a way that (...)
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  32. What are these Familiar Words Doing Here?A. W. Moore - 2002 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 51:147-171.
    This essay is concerned with six linguistic moves that we commonly make, each of which is considered in turn. These are: stating rules of representation; representing things categorically; mentioning expressions; saying truly or falsely how things are; saying vaguely how things are; and stating rules of rules of representation. A common-sense view is defended of what is involved in our doing each of these six things against a much more sceptical view emanating from the idea that linguistic behavior is fundamentally (...)
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  33.  17
    Wittgenstein and Transcendental Idealism.A. W. Moore - 2007 - In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 174–199.
    This chapter contains section titled: Introduction1 Was the Early Wittgenstein a Transcendental Idealist? Was the Later Wittgenstein a Transcendental Idealist?
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  34. Vats, sets, and tits.A. W. Moore - 2011 - In Joel Smith & Peter Sullivan (eds.), Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. Oxford University Press. pp. 41--54.
     
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  35.  46
    Can reflection destroy knowledge?A. W. Moore - 1991 - Ratio 4 (2):97-106.
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  36.  8
    Introduction.A. W. Moore - 2006 - In Bernard Williams (ed.), Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
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  37. Solispsim and subjectivity.A. W. Moore - 1996 - European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):220-235.
    This essay is concerned with solipsism, understood as the extreme sceptical view that I have no knowledge except of my subjective state. A less rough formulation of the view is mooted, inspired by a Quinean combination of naturalism and empiricism. An objection to the resultant position is then considered, based on Putnam’s argument that we are not brains in vats. This objection is first outlined, then pitted against a series of counter-objections. Eventually it is endorsed, but only at the price (...)
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  38.  39
    The Bounds of Sense.A. W. Moore - 2023 - In Jens Pier (ed.), Limits of Intelligibility: Issues from Kant and Wittgenstein. London: Routledge.
    This is an updated version of an essay originally written for a special issue of Philosophical Topics on the links between Kant and analytic philosophy. It explores these links by focusing on: Wittgenstein’s Tractatus; the logical positivism endorsed by Ayer; and the (very different) variation on that theme endorsed by Quine. The claim defended is that in all three cases we see analytic philosophers trying to attain and express a general philosophical understanding of why the bounds of sense should be (...)
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  39. Wittgenstein and infinity.A. W. Moore - 2011 - In Marie McGinn & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. Oxford University Press.
     
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  40. One World.A. W. Moore - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):934-945.
    This essay appeared as a contribution to a special issue of European Journal of Philosophy to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of P. F. Strawson’s The Bounds of Sense. In that book Strawson asks whether we should agree with Kant's claim, in his Critique of Pure Reason, that there can be only one world. What Kant means by this claim is that the four-dimensional realm that we inhabit must constitute the whole of empirical reality. Strawson gives reasons for (...)
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  41.  35
    Frege's permutation argument.A. W. Moore & Andrew Rein - 1987 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 28 (1):51-54.
  42.  64
    Ineffability and Reflections: An Outline of the Concept of Knowledge.A. W. Moore - 1993 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):285-308.
  43.  4
    A Study in Realism.A. W. Moore - 1922 - International Journal of Ethics 32 (2):215-218.
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  44.  73
    Human finitude, ineffability, idealism, contingency.A. W. Moore - 1992 - Noûs 26 (4):427-446.
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  45.  74
    Kantian humility: Our ignorance of things in themselves.A. W. Moore - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):117-120.
    Kant once wrote, “Many historians of philosophy... let the philosophers speak mere nonsense.... They cannot see beyond what the philosophers actually said to what they really meant to say.’ Rae Langton begins her book with this quotation. She concludes it, after a final pithy summary of the position that she attributes to Kant, with the comment, “That, it seems to me, is what Kant said, and meant to say”. In between are some two hundred pages of admirably clear, tightly argued (...)
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  46. I—The Presidential Address: Being, Univocity, and Logical Syntax.A. W. Moore - 2015 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (1pt1):1-23.
    In this essay I focus on the idea of the univocity of being, championed by Duns Scotus and given prominence more recently by Deleuze. Although I am interested in how this idea can be established, my primary concern is with something more basic: how the idea can even be properly thought. In the course of exploring this issue, which I do partly by borrowing some ideas about logical syntax from Wittgenstein's Tractatus, I try to show how there can be dialogue (...)
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  47. The underdetermination/indeterminacy distinction and the analytic/synthetic distinction.A. W. Moore - 1997 - Erkenntnis 46 (1):5-32.
    Two of Quine's most familiar doctrines are: that there is a distinction between underdetermination and indeterminacy; and that there is no distinction between analytic and synthetic truths. An argument is given that these two doctrines are incompatible. In terms wholly acceptable to Quine and based on the underdetermination/indeterminacy distinction, an exhaustive and exclusive distinction is drawn between two kinds of true sentences, which, it is argued, corresponds to the traditional analytic/synthetic distinction. An appendix is used to develop one aspect of (...)
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  48. Reason, freedom and Kant: An exchange.Robert Hanna & A. W. Moore - 2007 - Kantian Review 12 (1):113-133.
    According to Kant, being purely rational or purely reasonable and being autonomously free are one and the same thing. But how can this be so? How can my innate capacity for pure reason ever motivate me to do anything, whether the right thing or the wrong thing? What I will suggest is that the fundamental connection between reason and freedom, both for Kant and in reality, is precisely our human biological life and spontaneity of the will, a conjunctive intrinsic structural (...)
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  49.  48
    Bergson and pragmatism.A. W. Moore - 1912 - Philosophical Review 21 (4):397-414.
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  50. Beauty in the transcendental idealism of Kant and Wittgenstein.A. W. Moore - 1987 - British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (2):129-137.
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