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  1.  60
    The Evolution of Modern Metaphysics: Making Sense of Things.A. W. Moore - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is concerned with the history of metaphysics since Descartes. Taking as its definition of metaphysics 'the most general attempt to make sense of things', it charts the evolution of this enterprise through various competing conceptions of its possibility, scope, and limits. The book is divided into three parts, dealing respectively with the early modern period, the late modern period in the analytic tradition, and the late modern period in non-analytic traditions. In its unusually wide range, A. W. Moore's (...)
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  2.  37
    Kantian Humility: Our Ignorance of Things in Themselves.A. W. Moore - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):117.
    Kant once wrote, “Many historians of philosophy... let the philosophers speak mere nonsense.... They cannot see beyond what the philosophers actually said to what they really meant to say.’ Rae Langton begins her book with this quotation. She concludes it, after a final pithy summary of the position that she attributes to Kant, with the comment, “That, it seems to me, is what Kant said, and meant to say”. In between are some two hundred pages of admirably clear, tightly argued (...)
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  3.  21
    The View From Nowhere.A. W. Moore - 1987 - Philosophical Quarterly 37 (148):323-327.
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  4.  11
    Towards a New Philosophical Imaginary.A. W. Moore, Sabina Lovibond & Pamela Sue Anderson - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (1-2):8-22.
    The paper builds on the postulate of “myths we live by,” which shape our imaginative life, but which are also open to reflective study and reinvention. It applies this principle, in particular, to the concepts of love and vulnerability. We are accustomed to think of the condition of vulnerability in an objectifying and distancing way, as something that affects the bearers of specific social identities. Against this picture, which can serve as a pretext for paternalist and controlling attitudes to the (...)
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  5.  17
    The Infinite.Janet Folina & A. W. Moore - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):348.
    Anyone who has pondered the limitlessness of space and time, or the endlessness of numbers, or the perfection of God will recognize the special fascination of this question. Adrian Moore's historical study of the infinite covers all its aspects, from the mathematical to the mystical.
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  6.  77
    Maxims and Thick Ethical Concepts.A. W. Moore - 2006 - Ratio 19 (2):129–147.
    I begin with Kant's notion of a maxim and consider the role which this notion plays in Kant's formulations of the fundamental categorical imperative. This raises the question of what a maxim is, and why there is not the same requirement for resolutions of other kinds to be universalizable. Drawing on Bernard Williams' notion of a thick ethical concept, I proffer an answer to this question which is intended neither in a spirit of simple exegesis nor as a straightforward exercise (...)
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  7.  32
    Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty: Themes and Variations in Kants Moral and Religious Philosophy.A. W. Moore - 2003 - Routledge.
    In this bold and innovative new work, Adrian Moore poses the question of whether it is possible for ethical thinking to be grounded in pure reason. In order to understand and answer this question, he takes a refreshing and challenging look at Kant’s moral and religious philosophy. Identifying three Kantian Themes – morality, freedom and religion – and presenting variations on each of these themes in turn, Moore concedes that there are difficulties with the Kantian view that morality can be (...)
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  8.  20
    Points of View.A. W. Moore - 1997 - Clarendon Press.
    A. W. Moore argues in this bold and unusual book that it is possible to think about the world from no point of view. His argument involves discussion of a very wide range of fundamental philosophical issues, including the nature of persons, the subject-matter of mathematics, realism and anti-realism, value, the inexpressible, and God. The result is a powerful critique of our own finitude. 'imaginative, original, and ambitious' Robert Brandom, Times Literary Supplement.
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  9. Ineffability and Nonsense.A. W. Moore - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):169–193.
    [A. W. Moore] There are criteria of ineffability whereby, even if the concept of ineffability can never serve to modify truth, it can sometimes serve to modify other things, specifically understanding. This allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus and those who adopt the new reading recently championed by Diamond, Conant, and others. By maintaining that what the nonsense in the Tractatus is supposed to convey is ineffable understanding, rather than (...)
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  10. Points of View.A. W. Moore - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (288):291-295.
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  11.  28
    Was the Author of the Tractatus a Transcendental Idealist?A. W. Moore - 2013 - In Peter Sullivan Michael Potter (ed.), Wittgenstein's Tractatus. History and Interpretation. Oxford University Press. pp. 239.
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  12. The Transcendental Doctrine of Method.A. W. Moore - 2010 - In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Cambridge University Press.
  13. Points of View.A. W. Moore - 2000 - Mind 109 (433):166-170.
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  14.  49
    Transcendental Idealism in Wittgenstein, and Theories of Meaning.A. W. Moore - 1985 - Philosophical Quarterly 35 (139):134-155.
  15.  30
    I—A. W. Moore.A. W. Moore - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):169-193.
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  16.  26
    Wittgenstein and Transcendental Idealism.A. W. Moore - 2007 - In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Blackwell. pp. 174--199.
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  17.  46
    A Problem for Intuitionism: The Apparent Possibility of Performing Infinitely Many Tasks in a Finite Time.A. W. Moore - 1990 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 90:17 - 34.
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  18.  13
    Replies.A. W. Moore - 2015 - Philosophical Topics 43 (1-2):329-383.
    I am enormously grateful to everyone who has contributed to this double issue of Philosophical Topics, to Manuel Dries and Joseph Schear for conceiving the issue and initiating the process of inviting contributions, and to Ed Minar and Jack Lyons, former editor and current editor of the journal respectively, for their excellent work in bringing the issue into existence. Each contribution displays a level of engagement with my book1 that would have been gratifying even if the contribution had been confined (...)
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  19.  51
    Ineffability and Religion.A. W. Moore - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (2):161–176.
  20. Meaning and Reference.A. W. Moore (ed.) - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents a selection of the most important writings in the debate on the nature of meaning and reference which started one hundred years ago with Frege's classic essay "On Sense and Reference." Contributors include Bertrand Russell, P.F. Strawson, W.V. Quine, Donald Davidson, John McDowell, Michael Dummett, Hilary Putnam, Saul Kripke, David Wiggins, and Gareth Evans. The aim of this series is to bring together important recent writings in major areas of philosophical inquiry, selected from a wide variety of (...)
     
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  21.  96
    How significant is the use/mention distinction?A. W. Moore - 1986 - Analysis 46 (4):173.
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  22.  47
    One World.A. W. Moore - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):934-945.
  23.  27
    Apperception and the Unreality of Tense.A. W. Moore - 2001 - In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack (eds.), Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. pp. 375-391.
    The aim of this essay is to characterize the issue whether tense is real. Roughly, this is the issue whether, given any tensed representation, its tense corresponds in some suitably direct way to some feature of reality. The task is to make this less rough. Eight characterizations of the issue are considered and rejected, before one is endorsed. On this characterization, the unreality of tense is equivalent to the unity of temporal reality. The issue whether tense is real, so characterized, (...)
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  24.  58
    I—The Presidential Address: Being, Univocity, and Logical Syntax.A. W. Moore - 2015 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (1pt1):1-23.
    In this essay I focus on the idea of the univocity of being, championed by Duns Scotus and given prominence more recently by Deleuze. Although I am interested in how this idea can be established, my primary concern is with something more basic: how the idea can even be properly thought. In the course of exploring this issue, which I do partly by borrowing some ideas about logical syntax from Wittgenstein's Tractatus, I try to show how there can be dialogue (...)
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  25.  57
    Aspects of the Infinite in Kant.A. W. Moore - 1988 - Mind 97 (386):205-223.
  26.  48
    What Are These Familiar Words Doing Here?: A. W. Moore.A. W. Moore - 2002 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 51:147-171.
    My title is a quotation from Davidson's essay ‘On Saying That’. And although my concerns are at some remove from his, they do connect at one significant point. We find ourselves under the continual pressure of theory to deny that ordinary familiar semantic features of ordinary familiar words equip them to serve certain ordinary familiar functions. One of Davidson's aims is to resist that pressure as far as the function of reporting indirect speech is concerned. In similar vein I want (...)
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  27.  67
    On the Right Track. [REVIEW]A. W. Moore - 2003 - Mind 112 (446):307-322.
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  28. Reason, Freedom and Kant: An Exchange.Robert Hanna & A. W. Moore - 2007 - Kantian Review 12 (1):113-133.
    According to Kant, being purely rational or purely reasonable and being autonomously free are one and the same thing. But how can this be so? How can my innate capacity for pure reason ever motivate me to do anything, whether the right thing or the wrong thing? What I will suggest is that the fundamental connection between reason and freedom, both for Kant and in reality, is precisely our human biological life and spontaneity of the will, a conjunctive intrinsic structural (...)
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  29.  42
    Thomas Nagel, "The View From Nowhere". [REVIEW]A. W. Moore - 1987 - Philosophical Quarterly 37 (48):323.
  30.  51
    Solispsim and Subjectivity.A. W. Moore - 1996 - European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):220-235.
  31.  56
    Human Finitude, Ineffability, Idealism, Contingency.A. W. Moore - 1992 - Noûs 26 (4):427-446.
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  32.  45
    Ineffability and Reflections: An Outline of the Concept of Knowledge.A. W. Moore - 1993 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):285-308.
  33.  45
    Kantian Humility: Our Ignorance of Things in Themselves.A. W. Moore - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):117-120.
    Kant once wrote, “Many historians of philosophy... let the philosophers speak mere nonsense.... They cannot see beyond what the philosophers actually said to what they really meant to say.’ Rae Langton begins her book with this quotation. She concludes it, after a final pithy summary of the position that she attributes to Kant, with the comment, “That, it seems to me, is what Kant said, and meant to say”. In between are some two hundred pages of admirably clear, tightly argued (...)
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  34.  41
    On Saying and Showing.A. W. Moore - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (242):473 - 497.
  35.  29
    Can Reflection Destroy Knowledge?A. W. Moore - 1991 - Ratio 4 (2):97-106.
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  36.  21
    Frege's Permutation Argument.A. W. Moore & Andrew Rein - 1987 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 28 (1):51-54.
  37.  91
    Quasi-Realism and Relativism. [REVIEW]A. W. Moore - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):150–156.
    1. If it is true that ‘an ethic is the propositional reflection of the dispositions and attitudes, policies and stances, of people,’ as Simon Blackburn says in summary of the quasi-realism that he champions in this excellent and wonderfully provocative book, then it seems to follow that different dispositions, attitudes, policies and stances—different conative states, for short—will issue in different ethics, each with an equal claim to truth; and this in turn seems to be one thing that could be reasonably (...)
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  38.  80
    Possible Worlds and Diagonalization.A. W. Moore - 1984 - Analysis 44 (1):21 - 22.
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  39.  91
    Beauty in the Transcendental Idealism of Kant and Wittgenstein.A. W. Moore - 1987 - British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (2):129-137.
  40.  32
    Solipsism and Subjectivity.A. W. Moore - unknown
  41.  27
    The Metaphysics of Perspective: Tense and Colour. [REVIEW]A. W. Moore - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (2):387–394.
    1. Is tense real? It is as difficult to know how to interpret this question as it is to know, on any reasonable interpretation, which side to take. But I am persuaded that there are reasonable interpretations, by which I mean interpretations whereby neither the view that tense is real nor the view that tense is unreal is crazy. On one such interpretation, to affirm that tense is real is to be committed to the following, and to affirm that tense (...)
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  42. Wittgenstein and Infinity.A. W. Moore - 2011 - In Marie McGinn & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. Oxford University Press.
     
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  43.  96
    Not to Be Taken at Face Value.A. W. Moore - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):116-125.
    It is a long time since I have admired a book as much as I admire this one. It is a long time since I have disagreed with a book as profoundly as I disagree with this one. I hope this combination of reactions on my part has more than whatever limited biographical interest it has. I hope it helps to signal the combination of excellence and provocation that mark Timothy Williamson's book, which is at once beautifully clear, forcefully argued, (...)
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  44. The Underdetermination/Indeterminacy Distinction and the Analytic/Synthetic Distinction.A. W. Moore - 1997 - Erkenntnis 46 (1):5-32.
    Two of W. V. Quine''s most familiar doctrines are his endorsement of the distinction between underdetermination and indeterminacy, and his rejection of the distinction between analytic and synthetic truths. The author argues that these two doctrines are incompatible. In terms wholly acceptable to Quine, and based on the underdetermination/indeterminacy distinction, the author draws an exhaustive and exclusive distinction between two kinds of true sentences, and then argues that this corresponds to the traditional analytic/synthetic distinction. In an appendix the author expands (...)
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  45.  62
    “Humanism”.A. W. Moore - 1904 - The Monist 14 (5):747-752.
  46.  37
    Quasi‐Realism and Relativism.A. W. Moore - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):150-156.
    1. If it is true that ‘an ethic is the propositional reflection of the dispositions and attitudes, policies and stances, of people,’ as Simon Blackburn says in summary of the quasi-realism that he champions in this excellent and wonderfully provocative book, then it seems to follow that different dispositions, attitudes, policies and stances—different conative states, for short—will issue in different ethics, each with an equal claim to truth; and this in turn seems to be one thing that could be reasonably (...)
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  47.  40
    On Saying and Showing: A. W. Moore.A. W. Moore - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (242):473-497.
    There is not, and may there never be, any treatise by me …onthese things, for the subject is not communicable in words, as othersciences are. Rather is it that, after long association in the business itself and a shared life, a light is lit in the soul, kindled, as it were, by a leaping flame, and thenceforward feeds itself.
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  48.  43
    A Note on Kant's First Antinomy.A. W. Moore - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (169):480-485.
  49.  1
    Things and Ideals.A. W. Moore - 1925 - International Journal of Ethics 35 (3):310-312.
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  50.  41
    Arguing with Derrida.A. W. Moore - 2000 - Ratio 13 (4):355–386.
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